Comically Sized
A person whose dwarfism who is not noted specifically and is played for laughs.


(permanent link) added: 2011-09-09 00:22:36 sponsor: EdnaWalker (last reply: 2012-01-17 10:22:09)

Add Tag:
Rolling Updates. Needs a Better Description.

A dwarf (a person with dwarfism) is a person with an adult height of 147 cm (58 in) or shorter. There are two kinds of dwarfism, disproportionate dwarfism (like achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism) and proportionate dwarfism (like growth-hormone deficiency).

In many cartoons, videogames, and other animated works, and comics, there are people who are dwarfs (that is, 58 in or shorter) without being noted as such at all and are Played for Laughs. Sometimes there are a few or some Comically Sized persons in the work, other times, many or most of the people in the work are Comically Sized.

This trope is about the tendency for most cartoons and many comics to feature a disproportionate large number of dwarfs in a general population. That is, more dwarfs in a general population than in Real Life.

Also, cartoons exagerate. If a charater is quite short - say 5 foot, they will appear 4 in a cartoon.

This trope is also about people whose dwarf status isn't noted, but is Played for Laughs.

Related to Fun Size, Pint-Sized Kid, Teens Are Short, Cartoonish Companions, and Miniature Senior Citizens.


Examples:

Anime and Manga

Comic Books
  • The Astérix series has the title character himself, as well as his fellow-villager Geriatrix.

Film
  • Carl Fredrickson and many of the other adult characters save for Charles Muntz from Up are this.
  • Skinner from Ratatouille
  • Edna Mode in The Incredibles.
  • Le Fou from Beauty and the Beast
  • Professor Flitwick in the Harry Potter films is an odd example. There's some discussion of it here. Basically, Rowling just described him as a short guy and in the film, there was a character played by (actual dwarf actor Warwick Davis) who was at some point identified as Flitwick. initially, Davis' character looked very goblin-like, but this was toned down over time. Shrug of God eventually decided that Flitwick was part goblin, part human.
  • Dark Helmet in Spaceballs. The reason for his small stature is making his Darth Vader parody more hilarious (the real Darth Vader was very tall). He's even tinier, halfling-sized, in the animated adaptation.
  • Lord Farquat from Shrek is a perfect example; they pointed out he was short several times, made jokes about it, but never called him a dwarf.

Literature
  • In The Woman in White, Walter describes Professor Pesca in this way:
    Without being actually a dwarf--for he was perfectly well proportioned from head to foot--Pesca was, I think, the smallest human being I ever saw out of a show-room.
  • The Oompa-Loompas in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and its adaptations, a race of jolly chocolate-enamoured singers which were blatantly based on Pygmies. In the book they were changed from dark-skinned Africans to light-skinned and blond people from a mystical land, in order to curb any obvious tones of racism, and the 1971 film made them orange for the same reason, but all versions kept the small size. The 2005 film used Deep Roy as a template, and so reverted to a more realistic Pygmy-like appearance, but kept the comical and musical nature.

Video Games
  • Played straight with Mario, Wario, and (even) Luigi from the Super Mario Bros. game series, but averted with Waluigi.

Web Comics

Western Animation
replies: 31

TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy