Created By: SonicLover on January 7, 2012 Last Edited By: QuestionMarker on December 28, 2014
Troped

Trivia/Demand Overload

Content is so popular that the servers it\'s hosted on can\'t handle the resulting traffic.

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(Grabbed by Question Marker since this trope has hats and yet no sponsor for two years.)


When the latest update to an online something-or-other is released, sometimes so many people crowd in to view it that the website crashes. That, ladies and gentlemen, is an example of a Demand Overload: an update or issue so awesome it's directly responsible for crashing the host website.

A Demand Overload can happen due to a number of reasons. It may be due to popularity caused by positive word-of-mouth or a good marketing campaign. But, especially in the age of social media, another common way to cause one is when a famous personality gives a Colbert Bump to a site that cannot handle the sudden and large increase in traffic the new publicity brings with it. A popular website like Reddit posting a link to a smaller, relatively unknown site can also cause a similar effect, known as the Slashdot effect.

This trope also applies to other forms of media; for example, a product selling out so quickly it can't be kept on the shelves. The technical term for when demands hugely overwhelms supply is backordered.

Contrast Acclaimed Flop. Depending on how you look at it, can be a subtrope of Gone Horribly Right.

Examples

    Crashed due to popularity 

Live Action TV... on the internet
  • While most promotions had problems when Internet pay per view became the hot new thing, few had as many as Ring of Honor in 2012, where several pay per views froze, lost audio synch, slowed down or crashed because too many people were viewing them at once. After prompting Sinclair for more money (so they could settle the issue), Sinclair decided to shoot a show just prove it could now handle the traffic, unfortunately they gave away this show for free, which lead to an even larger number of viewers and another crash.
  • This happened to STV (The Scottish version of ITV, the UK's main commercial television network) when it failed to anticipate the demand for the livestream of a debate about the upcoming referendum on Scottish independence after ITV itself decided not to show it outside Scotland itself. The servers couldn't cope with the demand from English, Welsh and Northern Irish viewers who understandably wished to see a debate that could help decide whether Scotland leaves the UK. STV were heavily criticised for failing to anticipate the demand and criticism intensified after it was learned both the BBC (the UK's public service broadcaster) and Sky (the UK's largest satellite/cable broadcaster) had offered to simulcast the debate so everyone else in the UK could see it only to be turned down by STV who wished to retain exclusive broadcast rights. Some wags suggested the failure of STV to manage the situation well was an harbinger of how Scotland would fare if it left the UK.

Video Games
  • Diablo IIIís disastrous launch was a particularly infamous example of this, because even people who just wanted to play the single player campaign could not play because of the required internet connection.
  • Broswer game Flight Rising launched expecting a small userbase, and was immediately flooded with thousands of new users upon the site being opened to the public. This proved to be far too much for the servers to bear, and the site would frequently crash during any high-traffic period following the site opening, particularly after content updates.
  • Katawa Shoujo's download server went down within seconds of release. Fortunately, the developers thought ahead and prepared torrent files.
  • The 2013 SimCity is best known for its server crash at release that prevented the game from being played. Although in this case it was because of poor server design. It's gone down in history as a massive failure of a publisher to anticipate user needs, rather than an unexpected rush on established bandwidth service.
  • When crowdsourcing opened for Star Citizen in October 2012, the custom-built website collapsed under the server load, costing Chris Roberts' project the early momentum. After they got the site working again a couple days later, they added a Kickstarter to make up for lost time.
  • Fanmade tributes to Super Smash Bros. are particularly prone to this, as the servers are usually managed out of pocket and are not built to handle a large amount of demand.
    • The Project M 3.0 update release kept suffering server crashes due to not only impatient fans, but large amounts of passionately casual Super Smash Bros. Brawl players attempting to purposely DDoS the release. Said server crashes interrupted and cancelled the upload multiple times. The initial download eventually had to be mirrored to file hosting site Mediafire so it could have a chance to be released at all until the initial hype relaxed enough to get the site stabilized.
    • Super Smash Flash 2 has suffered from this on numerous occasions on every major demo release stretching back to at least v0.7. The fact that it's prone to Schedule Slip anyway doesn't help.
  • The launch of Worldof Warcraftís fifth expansion, Warlords of Draenor, was plagued by unstable servers, latency issues and massive login queues. There were several causes for this, but the primary one was the huge numbers of people trying to log in at the same time and bottlenecking in the same zone. In the words of a Community Manager:
    We obviously expected an increase in logins, and prepared for well above what we were expecting. The actual amount is far above even that.

Web Comics
  • Girl Genius did it to themselves, and it takes a bit of explaining. Basically, it started off as a print comic. When the Foglios turned it into a webcomic, they had two different archives updating at the same time: the "101 archive" where they digitized the original print run, and the "advanced class archive", where they continued the story where the print run left off. In July 2007, the 101 archive caught up with the beginning of the advanced class archive. The volume of readers archive binging the advanced archive was enough to crash the comic's server.
  • Homestuck has "brought down the house" on several occasions, particularly with its Flash updates.
    • [S] Cascade, the finale of Act 5, is the definite record-holder so far. It was hosted on Newgrounds of all websites— and the traffic crashed the site about three minutes after!
  • The Order of the Stick used to slow to a halt whenever a new comic was posted, though this was mostly because of all the people hitting the forums.
  • The first page of Jeph Jacques' new comic killed the servers for his original comic, Questionable Content, and the new one.
  • The last page of Pascalle Lepas' webcomic Zap! killed the servers for it.

Web Original
  • The Brewing Network had a huge influx of downloads the last time Lunch Meet was uploaded, disrupting download of the shows that make money, to the amazement of Justin. the BN in general has download limits, with Justin pointing out that the daily limit is greater than 24 hours of content so people hitting 'download all' should calm down.
  • This happened when Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog came out.
  • This has happened a lot in the past to Dragon Cave during new releases and/or holidays.
  • iTunes servers crashed on Christmas and Boxing Day the year the iTunes gift cards were introduced due to so many getting them as gifts and trying to use them immediately. People were calling their ISPs trying to figure out why they couldn't get to this one site in particular, thinking it was their internet service.
  • When Mark started watching Buffy the Vampire Slayer on his Mark Watches site, the onslaught of Buffy fans broke the server multiple times before Mark had to get a new one to accommodate for them.
  • Netflix still has bandwidth problems due to the popularity of their streaming service.
  • The Simpsonize Me website (is that even still up?) that was launched in co-occurence with the Big Damn Simpsons Movie saw so much traffic during its early life on the internet that it frequently saw downtime. The fact that the site also utilized high-quality animated graphics didn't help either.
  • Mozilla's servers went down due to the volume of people downloading Firefox 3 when it came out.
  • This happened when German gaming blog gameone.de did a walkthrough of Deadly Premonition. After approximately 10 parts had been uploaded, the walkthrough became so popular that every new uploaded part made the site unresponsive for hours.
  • TV Tropes nearly ran into this during The Situation.

    Crashed due to a Colbert Bump / the Slashdot effect 
  • Anything Notch tweets. Seriously, that man is a walking DDOS waiting to happen. He tends to tweet about upcoming indie games, I think the count of sites he's brought down just by mentioning them is in the triple digits at this point.
  • On some parts of Twitter it's called #neilwebfail, because it'll happen to any site Neil Gaiman says you should look at. Stephen Fry can have the same effect.
    • Indeed, Stephen Fry said in an interview that he warns people when they ask him to push their website, as most such sites are unable to handle the traffic his mentioning would bring.
  • Back in the fall of 2010, before Minecraft was as massively popular as it is now, Penny Arcade made a two-part strip about Gabe playing the game, and linked to the game's website in the news post. Thousands of readers proceeded to bombard the site. Even after traffic died down a bit, the authorization servers were completely nuked, so Notch declared it a free weekend just to avoid processing so many logins.

    Physical copy ran out of stock 
  • Toy example: When The BBC began re-running Thunderbirds in 1992 (after it had been off the air for several years) stores quickly sold out of Tracy Island toys. As a compromise, Blue Peter came up with a build-it-yourself version.
  • Woodstock was provisioned for less than 50,000 but they sold 100,000 tickets. Then another 400,000 people showed up. The promoters begged the locals to make sandwiches so the concertgoers wouldn't starve and the US National Guard airlifted food in.
  • The type of toy popularity as seen in Jingle All the Way is based on toys like Cabbage Patch Dolls and Tickle Me Elmo becoming the hot toy in demand. Toy companies seek reactions like this.

    In-Universe Examples 
Comic Books
  • When Spider-Man publicly revealed his secret identity, the internet broke down because too many people were trying to do a name search on "Peter Parker" simultaneously.

Fan Fiction
  • From An Entry with a Bang: Five minutes after the pirates' departure, the video of their jump was on YouTube. Less than an hour later, YouTube crashed due to the sheer number of users trying to accessing this one video on the website.

Film
  • The Social Network establishes that the early incarnation of Facebook was a basic "Attractiveness Rating" web site piggybacking on Harvard servers, which was so unexpectedly popular it crashed the servers.
  • Toy Story 2 mentions that, when the Buzz Lightyear action figures originally came out, "short-sighted retailers" underestimated just how big the demand would be, and the initial run completely sold out in a few days. By the present, stores like Al's Toy Barn have caught up with demand by devoting an entire aisle to Buzz Lightyear.

Live-Action Television
  • The Big Bang Theory: Penny starts a small business making hair barrettes called "Penny Blossoms." The guys set up a website for her and an order comes in for 1,000, rush overnight delivery. The guys help her out making them all night. Then after they're done they find that the orignal order has been doubled.
  • In the penultimate episode (technically the Grand Finale) of Drake & Josh, Drake's song was set to be put into a Super Bowl commercial but due to a contract mistake was horribly altered electronically. Josh managed to switch the tapes that were going to be mixed into the commercial, and they were set to be sued for the illegal action. But the CEO said the original song was a massive hit, breaking their servers and ended up firing the Producer who tried to manipulate a hit song.
Community Feedback Replies: 96
  • January 7, 2012
    peccantis
    What next, Print Breaker for books that are out of print?
  • January 7, 2012
    SonicLover
    ^ ...Is that supposed to mean you're not in support of this trope?
  • January 7, 2012
    Generality
    Actually, we could expand this to products which were so unexpectedly popular that they quickly exhausted the systems of production, whatever they were. Although I have an inkling that such a page already exists.
  • January 8, 2012
    SonicLover
    ^ I can see the argument for this expansion, as this trope is a little slim otherwise. But that'd invalidate the name, and Bandwidth Breaker is sorta catchy.
  • January 8, 2012
    Noaqiyeum
    It doesn't even have three examples yet, so it's not tropable. The expanded version would be.
  • January 8, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    Netflix still has bandwidth problems due to the popularity of their streaming service.

    TV Tropes nearly ran into this during The Situation.
  • January 8, 2012
    dalek955
    Add the redirect Sold Out to cover physical media.
  • January 8, 2012
    Treblain
    This happened when Dr Horribles Sing Along Blog came out, IIRC.
  • January 8, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^ No, that would be a Super Trope.
  • January 9, 2012
    razorrozar7
    I'm in favor of the expansion, though Sold Out has... other connotations which make it less than desirable as a name. What about Flew Off The Shelves?
  • January 9, 2012
    Chabal2
    If going with the expanded version, Toy Story mentions that Buzz Lightyear action figures completely sold out in a few days, completely surprising the makers.

  • January 9, 2012
    SonicLover
    I'll expand it. I'll add all the examples at launch day.
  • January 9, 2012
    KTera
    Does this include things like the Slashdot Effect, where a site can break others by linking to them?
  • January 9, 2012
    Omeganian
    From An Entry With A Bang:

    Five minutes after the pirates' departure, the video of their jump was on You Tube. Less than an hour later, You Tube crashed due to the sheer number of users trying to accessing this one video on the website.
  • January 9, 2012
    kjnoren
    ^^ Reads exactly like the Slashdot effect, though nowadays I think other blogs have overtaken it. Fireballing is quite common.
  • January 9, 2012
    whizzerd
    When Mark started watching Buffy on his Mark Watches site, the onslaught of Buffy fans broke the server multiple times before Mark had to get a new one to accommodate for them.
  • January 9, 2012
    tustin2121
    ......Anything Notch tweets. Seriously, that man is a walking DDOS waiting to happen. I think the count of sites he's brought down just by mentioning them is in the triple digits at this point. ...He tends to tweet about upcoming indie games, if that helps fit the trope.
  • January 9, 2012
    randomsurfer
    The Big Bang Theory: Penny starts a small business making hair barrettes called "Penny Blossoms." The guys set up a website for her and an order comes in for 1,000, rush overnight delivery. The guys help her out making them all night. Then after they're done they find that the orignal order has been doubled.
  • January 9, 2012
    Dawnwing
    • This has happened a lot in the past to Dragon Cave during new releases and/or holidays.
  • January 10, 2012
    LeeM
    • Toy example: When The BBC began re-running Thunderbirds in 1992 (after it had been off the air for several years) stores quickly sold out of Tracy Island toys. As a compromise, Blue Peter came up with a build-it-yourself version.
  • January 10, 2012
    peccantis
    I'll have to ask: which part of popularity is a trope? This sounds like a form of Gushing About Shows You Like.
  • January 10, 2012
    LeeM
    ^ Not if it's about the effect of popularity (defined here in terms of traffic generated).
  • January 10, 2012
    DaibhidC
    On some parts of Twitter it's called #neilwebfail, because it'll happen to any site Neil Gaiman says you should look at. Stephen Fry can have the same effect.
  • January 10, 2012
    Generality
    Indeed, Stephen Fry said in an interview that he warns people when they ask him to push their website, as most such sites are unable to handle the traffic his mentioning would bring.
  • January 11, 2012
    SonicLover
    I think I'll put this Up For Grabs. I don't have the mental stamina to carry it anymore.
  • January 11, 2012
    Hadashi
    "As a compromise, Blue Peter came up with a build-it-yourself version."

    It's also said that they did this for children who's parents were too poor to afford the actual toys - which were very expensive. The idea was that you could get the Thunderbirds and build the island yourself.

    If this is Up For Grabs, I'll take it if nobody else feels like stepping in.
  • January 14, 2012
    SonicLover
    ^ I think it's yours.
  • January 17, 2012
    Kinswaous
    When Spider Man publicly revealed his secret identity, the internet broke down because too many people were trying to do a name search on "Peter Parker" simultaneoulsy.
  • January 17, 2012
    MorganWick
    The Order Of The Stick used to slow to a halt whenever a new comic was posted, though this was mostly because of all the people hitting the forums.
  • January 19, 2012
    KJMackley
    Back Ordered is the technical term for when demands hugely overwhelms supply, and obviously there is quite a mixture of fictional and real life examples, so that distinction should probably be made. Two fictional examples:
    • In the penultimate episode (technically the Grand Finale) of Drake And Josh, Drake's song was set to be put into a Super Bowl commercial but due to a contract mistake was horribly altered electronically. Josh managed to switch the tapes that were going to be mixed into the commercial, and they were set to be sued for the illegal action. But the CEO said the original song was a massive hit, breaking their servers and ended up firing the Producer who tried to manipulate a hit song.
    • The Social Network establishes that the early incarnation of Facebook was a basic "Attractiveness Rating" web site piggybacking on Harvard servers, which was so unexpectedly popular it crashed the servers.
  • February 18, 2012
    Westrim
    There are probably a few lists floating around the internet of Real Life server crashing events.
  • February 18, 2012
    reub2000
    I think the original description should point out that this is less common now-a-days than in the past. In the late 90s and early 00s slashdot could effectively take many websites offline. It occasionally happens today, but not as often. Computing power and bandwidth has increased exponentially. Virtual machines are more common and can be cloned onto more physical servers if need be. These are hosted by companies like Amazon which has a large reserve of computing power should a website need it in a crunch. Big files like the release of a new linux distro or patches for a game are spread via bittorent or other p2p filesharing programs.
  • February 18, 2012
    nman
    • Back in the fall of 2010, before Minecraft was as massively popular as it is now, Penny Arcade made a two-part strip about Gabe playing the game, and linked to the game's website in the news post. Thousands of readers proceeded to bombard the site. Even after traffic died down a bit, the authorization servers were completely nuked, so Notch declared it a free weekend just to avoid processing so many logins.
  • March 6, 2012
    Westrim
    This looks like the examples need to be incorporated and the page launched.
  • March 6, 2012
    KyleJacobs
    Katawa Shoujo's download server went down within seconds of release. Fortunately, the developers thought ahead and prepared torrent files.
  • March 21, 2012
    Westrim
    bump
  • February 3, 2013
    Westrim
    Reviving. There seems to have been conversation about expanding to other media. Should that be the case of should it just stick to web content? Certainly there have been concerts that were popular beyond capacity and media releases that sold out immediately upon release, but should they be associated with this?
  • February 3, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    This can happen to websites associated with non-web stuff as well, I think.
  • February 3, 2013
    StarSword
    I think we need to try and find a few more In Universe examples before I consider this a trope and not trivia.
    • When crowdsourcing opened for Star Citizen in October 2012, the custom-built website collapsed under the server load, costing Chris Roberts' project the early momentum. After they got the site working again a couple days later, they added a Kickstarter to make up for lost time.
  • February 3, 2013
    Tiiba
    I think either Wii or Xbox 360 (forgot) was really hard to find for a few months.
  • February 4, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    ^^Technically, it's an Audience Reaction, although with an implicit citation.
  • August 13, 2014
    Westrim
    bump
  • August 14, 2014
    BaffleBlend
    ^x6: I think so. After all, Tropes Are Flexible.

    • Fanmade tributes to Super Smash Bros are particularly prone to this, as the servers are usually managed out of pocket and are not built to handle a large amount of demand.
      • The Project M 3.0 update release kept suffering server crashes due to not only impatient fans, but large amounts of passionately casual Super Smash Bros Brawl players attempting to purposely DDoS the release. Said server crashes interrupted and cancelled the upload multiple times. The initial download eventually had to be mirrored to file hosting site Mediafire so it could have a chance to be released at all until the initial hype relaxed enough to get the site stabilized.
      • Super Smash Flash 2 has suffered from this on numerous occasions on every major demo release stretching back to at least v0.7. The fact that it's prone to Schedule Slip anyway doesn't help.
  • August 14, 2014
    randomsurfer
    Woodstock was provisioned for less than 50,000 but they sold 100,000 tickets. Then another 400,000 people showed up. The promoters begged the locals to make sandwiches so the concertgoers wouldn't starve and the US National Guard airlifted food in.
  • August 14, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    The Simpsonize Me website (is that even still up?) that was launched in co-occurence with the Big Damn Simpsons Movie saw so much traffic during its early life on the internet that it frequently saw downtime. The fact that the site also utilized high-quality animated graphics didn't help either.
  • August 14, 2014
    SpiderRider3
    Mozilla's servers went down due to the volume of people downloading Firefox 3 when it came out.
  • August 14, 2014
    IndirectActiveTransport
    Misuse. Your Mileage May Vary is for audience reactions. This is the effect caused by an audience reaction, making it Trivia at best and easily a candidate for a trope page if it is simply limited to story telling.

    For Trivia.

    • While most promotions had problems when Internet pay per view became the hot new thing, few had as many as Ring Of Honor in 2012, where several pay per views froze, lost audio synch, slowed down or crashed because too many people were viewing them at once. After prompting Sinclair for more money (so they could settle the issue), Sinclair decided to shoot a show just prove it could now handle the traffic, unfortunately they gave away this show for free, which lead to an even larger number of viewers and another crash.
  • August 14, 2014
    Chabal2
    Diablo III (and any always-online game, really) is a particularly infamous example of this, since it's supposed to be single-player games.
  • August 16, 2014
    MetaFour
    Girl Genius did it to themselves, and it takes a bit of explaining. Basically, it started off as a print comic. When the Foglios turned it into a webcomic, they had two different archives updating at the same time: the "101" archive where they digitized the original print run, and the "advanced class" archive, where they continued the story where the print run left off. In July 2007, the 101 archive caught up with the beginning of the advanced class archive. The volume of readers archive binging the advanced archive was enough to crash the comic's server.
  • August 25, 2014
    Exxolon
    This recently happened to STV (The Scottish version of ITV, the UK's main commercial television network) recently when it failed to anticipate the demand for the livestream of a debate about the upcoming referendum on Scottish independence after ITV itself decided not to show it outside Scotland itself. The servers couldn't cope with the demand from English, Welsh and Northern Irish viewers who understandably wished to see a debate that could help decide whether Scotland leaves the UK. STV were heavily criticised for failing to anticipate the demand and criticism intensified after it was learned both the BBC (the UK's public service broadcaster) and Sky (the UK's largest satellite/cable broadcaster) had offered to simulcast the debate so everyone else in the UK could see it only to be turned down by STV who wished to retain exclusive broadcast rights. Some wags suggested the failure of STV to manage the situation well was an harbinger of how Scotland would fare if it left the UK.
  • August 26, 2014
    StarSword
    This is Not A Trope. It's Trivia.
  • August 26, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    I just noticed that this originated way back in 2012, and the OP doesn't seem to have updated this thing since then.

    Up For Grabs?
  • August 26, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Yeah.

    I'm not gonna grab this though.
  • August 26, 2014
    DracMonster
    It would be a trope when used in a work. But if the work's publication/dispersal caused it, then it's trivia.
  • August 26, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ this was meant to be trivia, I think.
  • September 10, 2014
    Westrim
    There are certainly plenty of works that reference servers crashing for a popular item or site on the web.

    Exo, part of the Jumper series by Steven Gould, has several different breaks happen, most notably the launch of a site for insertion and extraction of satellites and space debris that goes through a couple rounds of crashes and upgrades before it's finally able to handle the traffic.
  • September 10, 2014
    alaman
    This happened when German gaming blog gameone.de did a walkthrough of Deadly Premonition. After approximately 10 parts had been uploaded, the walkthrough became so popular that every new uploaded part made the site unresponsive for hours.
  • September 26, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Someone needs to grab this.
  • September 26, 2014
    bwburke94
    The 2013 Sim City is best known for its server crash at release that prevented the game from being played.
  • September 26, 2014
    DAN004
    Someone needs to change the title.
  • September 26, 2014
    Generality
    ^^ Although in this case it was because of poor server design. It's gone down in history as a massive failure of a publisher to anticipate user needs, rather than an unexpected rush on established bandwidth service.
  • September 26, 2014
    SvartiKotturinn
    Didn't the online registration for Obamacare have the same problem?
  • September 30, 2014
    QuestionMarker
    Colbert Bump is a related trope, as it often causes a large and unexpected increase in taffic to a website.
  • September 30, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Someone grab this please.
  • September 30, 2014
    Chernoskill
    Didn't the famous Academy Awards selfie by ellen Degeneres, Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence etc. somehow "bring down" Twitter? I recall reading a comment along those lines by Degeneres.
  • September 30, 2014
    Skylite
    So maybe instead of Bandwidth Breaker we want to call it Explosive Popularity?

    The proper name is "Affordable Care Act" and "Healthcare Marketplace". Obamacare is a derogatory nickname given it by detractors.

    Webcomics
    • The first page of Jeph Jacques' new comic killed the servers for his original comic, Questionable Content, and the new one.
    • The last page of Pascalle Lepas' webcomic Zap killed the servers for it.

    Real Life
    • The type of toy popularity as seen in Jingle All The Way is based on toys like Cabbage Patch Dolls and Tickle Me Elmo becoming the hot toy in demand. Toy companies seek reactions like this.
  • September 30, 2014
    SeptimusHeap
    Worth noting that Obamacare has been adapted by its supporters later on. Also, I don't agree with Explosive Popularity, as it completely changes the focus of the trope. Related to that, that Real Life entry in ^ needs to explain how it applies.
  • September 30, 2014
    DAN004
    Contrast Acclaimed Flop
  • October 3, 2014
    QuestionMarker
    If no one has any objections, I'm going to grab this. Seeing as it already has four hats and abunch of examples, this is definitely tropable. I do think the page should become a trivia one, with examples sorted by media type (blogs, games, etc). Then if we find in-universe examples we can always add those in a separate folder.

    EDIT: busy consolidating the examples right now and it seems that there are four subtropes(?) to this one:
    • Physical copy running out of stock.
    • Popularity causes a bandwidth breaker.
    • A Colbert Bump or the Slashdot effect causes a bandwidth breaker. Specifically, the slashdot effect refers to a popular site linking to a small site causing a massive increase in traffic, while a Colbert Bump is caused by a famous personality. I'm not sure if these are different enough to split up.

    How about we sort the examples by these types, and add a fourth folder for in-universe examples? Then we can sort the examples by media under each type.

    EDIT 2: posted a significantly edited version of the description to reflect the above proposed structure. Feedback please.
  • October 3, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Yes, thank you, this thread desperately needed to be grabbed!
  • October 5, 2014
    JujuP
    See also Slashdot effect.

    Web Original
    • Reddit users have been known to crash entire website due to the enhanced traffic caused by them posting links.
  • October 5, 2014
    surgoshan
    Colbert Bump

    • The boys of Penny Arcade learned a long time ago to be cautious about recommending or praising anything, because doing so tended to destroy the server of whoever they happened to like. God forbid they criticize something.
  • October 5, 2014
    SpiderRider3
    This is what a mass call event is in telephony— too many people attempting to call people at once, with not enough circuits to go around.
  • October 7, 2014
    mew4ever23
    At the launch of Worldof Warcraft's Burning Crusade expansion, many servers melted from having their entire population march on The Dark Portal.

    Happened several times over the course of semi-open beta of Toontown Rewritten, a Toontown Online fan server.
  • October 7, 2014
    DAN004
  • October 7, 2014
    nlpnt
    It's called the Reddit Hug of Death on that site.
  • October 8, 2014
    SeptimusHeap
    ^^That strikes me as fairly ambiguous.
  • October 8, 2014
    peas_and_corn
    The Brewing Network had a huge influx of downloads the last time Lunch Meet was uploaded, disrupting download of the shows that make money, to the amazement of Justin. the BN in general has download limits, with Justin pointing out that the daily limit is greater than 24 hours of content so people hitting 'download all' should calm down.
  • October 8, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^ that was my guess, anyway. But still, isn't this essentially about a demand for a work that is so high that the creator can't provide it to everyone - thus, too much demand?

    Maybe we should try a Trope Namer for this one? Not sure if everyone would be familiar with Slashdot Effect, though.

  • October 8, 2014
    FuzzyBoots
    Ed Carter famously lost a house due to a higher than expected number of backers on Kickstarter for his boardgame project.
  • October 9, 2014
    Skylite
    • REAL LIFE: iTunes servers crashed on Christmas and Boxing Day the year the iTunes gift cards were introduced due to so many getting them as gifts and trying to use them immediately. People were calling their ISPs trying to figure out why they couldn't get to this one site in particular, thinking it was their internet service.
  • October 10, 2014
    MetaFour
    I went and sorted the examples under the Unsorted examples header.
  • November 18, 2014
    DAN004
    What about simply calling this Back Ordered?
  • November 20, 2014
    SeptimusHeap
    No idea what that means.
  • November 20, 2014
    DAN004
    " The technical term for when demands hugely overwhelms supply is backordered."
  • November 20, 2014
    jormis29
    How about Demand Overload
  • November 21, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Yay.
  • November 21, 2014
    CompletelyDifferent
    • This has happened multiple times on the Mark Does Stuff blogs when Mark began to review particularly popular shows or books.
  • December 8, 2014
    DAN004
    Bump for now, cuz I'm not sure who's in charge of this thing
  • December 10, 2014
    QuestionMarker
    Looking for more yays for Demand Overload before I change the name, but I personally think it's a better name than Bandwidth Breaker. Other suggestions also welcome.
  • December 10, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ yay yay yay yay yay yay?
  • December 23, 2014
    DAN004
    Bump yay.
  • December 23, 2014
    Prfnoff
    In case it wasn't clear, the Trivia/ namespace is only for work subpages.
  • December 23, 2014
    randomsurfer
    Magazines: Invoked by the magazine Paper in 2014 when they published some authorized nude photos of Kim Kardashian. The Cover Blurb to that issue is "Break the internet Kim Kardashain."
  • December 23, 2014
    Darksilverhawk
    • Broswer game Flight Rising launched expecting a small userbase, and was immediately flooded with thousands of new users upon the site being opened to the public. This proved to be far too much for the servers to bear, and the site would frequently crash during any high-traffic period following the site opening, particularly after content updates.
  • December 28, 2014
    QuestionMarker
    ^^^ Good point, hadn't noticed. Does it say anywhere how to mark a main page as trivia?

    Changed the title. Launching soon.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=q15kdqpuk1aldfq9pztc24b6