Created By: pcw2727 on July 8, 2012 Last Edited By: pcw2727 on August 16, 2012
Troped

TMI Lie

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One of the best types of lies are ones which make people want to stop asking questions all together. A good way to accomplish this is for the lie to be about something You Don't Want to Know.

TMI lies are great not only because they cause the person questioning them to lose interest but they are a good cover up for suspicious behavior. Bob might be suspicious if Alice claims she snuck off in the middle of the night without telling anyone to get ice cream, if she claims she did so to replenish her tampon supply on the other hand there's at least a 9/10 chance that Bob will leave it at that.

"Womens problems" in fact are a very common TMI Liei. There is even an example of this happening in Biblical scripture, making this trope Older Then Feudalism. For men explosive diarrhea is a much more popular choice.

Compare Bread, Eggs, Milk, Squick.

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]

In an episode of Breaking Bad Walter lies about having explosive diarrhea as an excuse for not helping Hank investigate his meth distributing boss.

  • In a Murphy Brown episode, Murphy helps a fellow employee, Hillary, who she recognizes has a drinking problem. After Hillary realizes she needs help after screwing up an assignment, Murphy suggests using food poisoning as a cover story, as nobody wants to know the details.

[[folder:Film]]

In The Amazing Spiderman Gwen Stacy gets rid of her dad while Peter is in her bed room by claiming she has "cramps" and further implying they are menstrual in nature.

Ruthless People: Judge Reinhold's character has kidnapped a woman. Some cops come in to question him, and he excuses himself saying he has a touch of stomach flu. They hear moans and groans from the back room and assume he's having serious diarrhea but he's really trying to sneak out a back window. Meanwhile the cops have received a call implicating the husband, so they just leave.

[[folder:Real Life]]

This was a factor in the Lizzie Borden murder trial. She said that bloody cloths that a witness had seen had been menstrual cloths (they didn't have disposable feminine products back then) and everybody involved with the trial all got squicked out over this discussion of menstruation and decided to just accept that explanation and move on so they wouldn't have to hear about it anymore.

[[folder:Religion]]

In The Bible, Jacob and Rachel flee from Rachel's father Laban, stealing some of his household idols as they go. Laban catches up to them and demands to search their tents for the idols. Rachel sits on top of them and when Laban gets to her tent and tells her to move, she claims that "the manner of women" is upon her, so she can't get up. Laban believes her and leaves.

[[folder:Webcomic]

The webcomic Menage a 3 lampshades this trope, when giving Gary an excuse not to go into work one day, by giving a very descriptive yet squick explanation. He gets caught by the end of the story arc, though.

  • In one Order Of The Stick strip, Haley has a huge sack, and claims she didn't find any treasure. When Roy asks what's in the sack, she replies "Feminine products". Roy decides to leave it there.
Community Feedback Replies: 30
  • July 15, 2012
    Astaroth
    Real Life: Charlie Brooker once wrote a newspaper column in which he suggested telling your boss you soiled yourself in order to get a day off work.
  • July 15, 2012
    LordCirce
    I know explosive diarrhea is one of the most common of these. This sounds like a variant of You Don't Want To Know, or Bread Eggs Milk Squick. I would suggest the name Squick Herring.
  • July 15, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Ruthless People: Judge Reinhold's character has kidnapped a woman. Some cops come in to question him, and he excuses himself saying he has a touch of stomach flu. They hear moans and groans from the back room and assume he's having serious diarrhea but he's really trying to sneak out a back window. Meanwhile the cops have received a call implicating the husband, so they just leave.
  • July 15, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    • In a Murphy Brown episode, Murphy helps a fellow employee, Hillary, who she recognizes has a drinking problem. After Hillary realizes she needs help after screwing up an assignment, Murphy suggests using food poisoning as a cover story, as nobody wants to know the details.
  • July 15, 2012
    reub2000
    In the The Simpsons episode "How I Spent My Strummer Vacation", Homer really did get violent diarrhea.
  • July 16, 2012
    WannabeDamselErrant
    I thought of Too Much Info Alibi for a name for this, but I think Squick Herring's best, to be honest.
  • July 16, 2012
    ceen
    TMI Alibi does have a nice ring to it.
  • July 16, 2012
    LordCirce
    I change my vote to TMI Alibi. Maybe we can have and AKA and redirect using squick herring.
  • July 16, 2012
    Arivne
    The name Squick Herring only makes sense if you know it's referring to Red Herring (and not, say, With This Herring). That makes it a Bad Snowclone.

  • August 4, 2012
    pcw2727
    I kind of like the name Squick Herring. Could ad a note "derived from the term Red Herring not related to With This Herring"

    Hmm TMI Alibi is also good cause it rhymes
  • August 4, 2012
    IsaacSapphire
    I don't much like Squick Herring, if only because I find actual herrings kind of squicky. And the rhyming is a definite bonus with TMI Alibi.

    Real Life: This was a factor in the Lizzie Borden murder trial. She said that bloody cloths that a witness had seen had been menstrual cloths (they didn't have disposable feminine products back then) and everybody involved with the trial all got squicked out over this discussion of menstruation and decided to just accept that explanation and move on so they wouldn't have to hear about it anymore.
  • August 4, 2012
    randomsurfer
    The Simpsons: Principal Skinner counters the charge that he and Mrs. Krabappel were having sex in the janitor's closet [[hottip:*:they really weren't, they were just making out]] by telling everyone he's a virgin.
    Superintendent Chalmers: Well, it's clear you've been falsely accused. Because no one, anywhere, ever, would pretend to be a 44-year-old virgin.
  • August 4, 2012
    Rognik
    The webcomic Menage a 3 lampshades this trope, when giving Gary an excuse not to go into work one day, by giving a very descriptive yet squick explanation. He gets caught by the end of the story arc, though.
  • August 5, 2012
    pcw2727
    ^^ That's not an example because it was actually true.
  • August 6, 2012
    randomsurfer
    ^I'm not convinced it was "actually true." Although it is true to his character, we don't know that for a fact; if nothing else, the 20ish years Skinner spent as Armin Tamzarian left him plenty of time for making whoopie with easy girls before he became Seymour Skinner. Also, after everyone leaves Skinner & Mrs. K give each other a "can you believe they fell for that??" look.
  • August 6, 2012
    LordCirce
    I totally support the name TMI Alibi. It is much better than my idea of Squick Herring.
  • August 6, 2012
    spideydude
    In The Bible, Jacob and Rachel flee from Rachel's father Laban, stealing some of his household idols as they go. Laban catches up to them and demands to search their tents for the idols. Rachel sits on top of them and when Laban gets to her tent and tells her to move, she claims that "the manner of women" is upon her, so she can't get up. Laban believes her and leaves.
  • August 7, 2012
    DaibhidC
    • In one Order Of The Stick strip, Haley has a huge sack, and claims she didn't find any treasure. When Roy asks what's in the sack, she replies "Feminine products". Roy decides to leave it there.
  • August 9, 2012
    CrankyStorming
    I don't get the title. As someone looking at this page after it's launched, all it does is remind me of a Saturday morning childrens block from a few years ago, which I am not familiar with and assume does not provide an example, else it would have been listed.
  • August 9, 2012
    Rognik
    ^TMI is common internet lingo for "Too Much Information". In other words, a person gives far too much information, generally of a personal nature. I think the old title was "Squick Alibi", if that gives you a better sense of it.
  • August 9, 2012
    malonkey1
    You know, if it dates back to Jacob and Rachel The Bible, it would qualify for Older Than Dirt.
  • August 9, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    ^^ TMI is not "internet lingo" tho
  • August 10, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    Let's also include examples where the alibi is actually a real one, not just a cover story. An alibi does not mean a lie (*cough*pcw2727*cough*), it means are place or reason, that puts you other than the scene of the crime. Also, I doubt it's tropeable if we only stick to examples that aren't true. Which means it probably needs a new description.

    This happens all the time in Castle.
  • August 10, 2012
    Tiiba
    This Internet lingo is not common enough for me to have ever heard it. And there's nothing wrong with the old name, "squick alibi".
  • August 10, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    Someone not having heard of it doesn't make it bad, and TMI Alibi sounds better than that does.
  • August 11, 2012
    pcw2727
    ^^^^ It's clearly quite tropable when only lies are considered since we have quite a few already. By your definition most of these aren't actually alibis they're just lies to cover things up. How about just TMI Lie?
  • August 11, 2012
    captainsandwich
    I think the formatting needs work before we launch it.
  • August 12, 2012
    pcw2727
    If anyone wants to jump in and format it be my guest. I'm not up on all my text codes and such.
  • August 15, 2012
    pcw2727
    mother f-
  • August 16, 2012
    lu127
    You shouldn't have launched this. It's full of bad formatting, spelling errors and there's disagreement over the name.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=oyqeeu7eft76tymnc6diq7uo