Created By: Bonsai Forest on January 26, 2008
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CriticProof

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There are those movies, books, games and so on that no matter how BAD they are, people will see them anyway. The reason is often because the reviewer dislikes it for reasons separate from why fans like it.

For instance, TV Guide had a review trashing a Goosebumps special (which incidentally is shown on FOX, TV Guide's sister company). Kids watched it anyway. Do kids really care what TV Guide thinks about their favorite horror book series and a show based on it?

Another example is Left Behind. The books are said to be really badly written, and I read a blog entry that gave specific examples of stupid the characters act. But their target audience strongly believes the books' message and doesn't care how much bad dialog, unrealistic plot devices and so on get in the way of what's important to them.

Anyway, this is Critic-Proof, when no critic can stop a work's popularity.

Any examples? Do we have an article like this? (NOT Preaching to the Choir, which is when you make a work aimed at those who already agree with it)
Community Feedback Replies: 20
  • January 26, 2008
    TragicTheDragon
    Film Example - The fact that those guys who do all those "Scary Movie" movies are still cranking them out.
  • January 26, 2008
    Seanette
    IMO, Rambo and Rocky could both go here.
  • January 26, 2008
    Narvi
    Hey, Rocky doesn't count. Critics liked Rocky. They just didn't like some of the sequels.

    The Transformers movie.

    The Star Wars prequels might count.

    Pirates Of The Caribbean is still a well-loved franchise despite critics complaining about all three movies.
  • January 26, 2008
    Insanity Prelude
    Everything Disney Channel makes these days.
  • January 26, 2008
    HeartBurnKid
    Protection From Editors is related, I think.
  • January 27, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    Michael Bay films are like this. Most reviewers seem to think shots more than three seconds is some kind of sacred cow.
  • January 27, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    Actually, the first Pirates got good reviews. But otherwise it's a great example, considering many of its fans are the kind of folks who would normally be with the critics on slamming stuff like Michael Bay and Eddie Murphy movies.

    Usually a sequel or anything adapted from another medium is bound to be critic-proof, as it has a built in audience already.
  • January 27, 2008
    Ununnilium
    Something that's Preaching To The Choir is often this as well, though; Left Behind is a good example of both.
  • January 27, 2008
    Unknown Troper
    Well, I thought the first Rambo was liked by critics too... at least it is now, especially when compared to its (rather ridiculous) sequels.
  • July 21, 2009
    Jack Butler
    Battlefield Earth and the rest of L. Ron Hubbard's bibliography. Not because its popular, but because every once in a while, the Church of Scientology sends people out to buy up as many copies of his books as possible, just to put him back on the best seller list.
  • July 21, 2009
    marjojo
    The Twilight movies The Pokemon movies The Narnia movies The movies from Dan Brown books

    Basically, anything with an established fandom.
  • July 21, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    In music, just about any re-united band. A band that broke up 20 years ago and are now making a new album? It'll sell huge. Reunion tour? Sold out. No matter how poorly the members have aged, no matter how different their new music is, it'll all make a ton of money.
  • July 21, 2009
    BrainSewage
    300
  • July 21, 2009
    Recon5
    @Jack Butler: He was a pretty popular writer before Happyology, though. That's how he managed to get so many followers.

    Yes, I do know the name is Scientology but Happyology sounds funnier.
  • July 22, 2009
    EricDVH
    What's the exact difference from Guilty Pleasure? Is it that the consumers of Critic Proof stuff don't feel the slightest bit of shame for enjoying it, while the consumers of a Guilty Pleasure do?
  • July 22, 2009
    castaghast
    The Simpsons. At this point it's basically the same show that premiered in '89 in name only, however you just can't convince anyone in the US that the writing has gotten worse, the characters have gotten flat, and the comedy went south long ago.
  • July 22, 2009
    Jack Butler
    Basically, yeah.
  • July 22, 2009
    Duncan
    The Star Wars Prequels are an interesting case, since due to all the product tie-ins and merchandising, the movies had recouped their investment before even opening. So, not only critic-proof, but audience-proof as well.
  • July 22, 2009
    I Like Crows
    For video games, would the newer Sonic The Hedgehog games count?
  • July 22, 2009
    castaghast
    @Eric DVH: I would think that the difference would be in the level of popularity, and who likes it. Guilty Pleasure seems to imply that a sizable enough audience likes a work that it doesn't merely fade out of existence, despite active dislike by most other consumers. Complaints may be valid, and most people may listen, it's just that one group who doesn't care. With Critic Proof, the comments and criticism are irrelevant, the audience likes it anyway. Unlike Guilty Pleasure, where most people acknowledge that show X is bad, nobody listens or cares that show X is bad with Critic Proof. The critic may be just as, if not more correct in their assessment of a CP show than a GP one, however due to being CP, no one cares.
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