Give Me A Sword


(permanent link) added: 2009-12-14 17:51:29 sponsor: Goldfritha (last reply: 2009-12-14 17:51:29)

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An unarmed character faces a fight. Another character must give him a sword or other weapon.

Wrecked Weapon may lead to this, or having a sword jam in the wound so the character can't pull it free.

It is often a tribute to the fighting skill of the unarmed man or Fire Forged Friendship of the one who gives it -- especially if he does not use the Stock Phrase but the other characters do so anyway, or someone else says "Give him your sword." Location may also be significant -- throwing a sword to a man who is toe-to-toe with the monster is only prudent (and avoids Throwing Your Sword Always Works). Of course, failure to do that get the inverse effect, which may shade into The Dog Bites Back, if a Mook refuses to give the Big Bad something without which he is powerless and helpless.

Unlike It Was a Gift, this is temporary, especially for the Cool Sword and other weapons not easily replaced. Expect the character to return the weapon after the fight, with thanks. If he is then told to keep the weapon, it transformed into It Was a Gift as well; it is a particularly strong tribute, particularly with the Cool Sword or other unusual weapons.

Will certainly occur if needed for Combat by Champion. May occur for Duel to the Death, though other character may defuse that one.

Examples

Anime and Manga
  • In Zero no Tsukaima, Saito's first combat experience is a duel with a student mage (and noble) who forges him a sword on the spot.

Film
  • In Gladiator, Maximum disarms Commodus in the arena, and Commodus immediately starts demanding one of the surrounding royal guards to give him a sword. If he hadn't recently and publically dishonored his own royal guards, they might have given him one
  • The Golden Voyage of Sinbad. Occurs twice at the beginning of the fight with the statue of the Hindu goddess Kali. First Sinbad throws Prince Koura a sword so Sinbad can duel him, then Koura throws the sword to Kali. After Kali snatches it out of the air she "grows" another sword in each of her other five hands. Watch it here.
  • A particularly awesome example in the Baz Luhrmann Romeo Juliet, which ironically features a gun rather than a sword, despite this line:
    "Fetch me my longsword."

Literature
  • In The King Must Die, when Theseus is fighting a duel, his spear breaks, and his men throw their spears about him so he can pick one from the ground. His foe did not get such treatment when his weapon broke.
  • In Piers Anthony's Centaur Aisle, the king demands a sword to fight his Evil Uncle; this is shot down because on one hand, the sword is magical giving him an unfair advantage, and on the other hand, if the magic is not used, the king is wounded and so his uncle has an unfair advantage.
  • In James Swallow's Warhammer 40,000 Blood Angels novel Deus Sanguinius, when Mephiston let Rafen act as the Blood Angels' champion, he ordered a sergeant to give Rafen his sword. Later, he orders that Rafen be given a jump pack so he can pursue his foe.
    • In Red Fury, when Rafen has his back to the Tomb of Sanguinius, and has pierced one heart of the Blood Fiend trying to desecrate it, Mephiston throws him his Cool Sword so that Rafen can get its other heart.
  • Happens with Cohen the Barbarian and Twoflower the tourist at the end of Terry Pratchett's Interesting Times. Twoflower has no chance to win against the Big Bad of the story either way of course, but Cohen gives him a sword anyway as a sign that he takes his wish to fight him seriously.
  • In Dan Abnett's Warhammer 40,000 Gaunt's Ghosts novel Blood Pact, Wes Maggs asks this, repeatedly. Unfortunately, while delirious he had attacked the prisoner they were protecting and Gaunt's not sure he can trust him. He ends up taking a gun from a downed foe, and Gaunt does not object.
  • In Dune, when Paul challenges Feyd Harkonnen, the emperor offers his own sword to the latter, who readily accepts.

Live-Action TV
  • In Firefly, Malcolm Reynolds accidentally challenges a nobleman to a duel and has to be provided with a sword... and a crash course in using it.

Mythology
  • In some versions of the Arthurian legend, the reason Arthur pulls the sword out of the Stone is that Kay had forgotten his and had sent him to fetch one.

Theater
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