Created By: thewriterFebruary 15, 2012 Last Edited By: thewriterAugust 31, 2015

The Ratio of Exposure vs Enjoyment

A character hates something, until they spend five hours exposed to nothing but that thing.

Name Space:
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Page Type:
Trope
Do We Have This One? Needs A Better Title, Needs More Examples.

Laconic: How much someone likes/dislikes something decreases proportionally to the length of time that person is exposed to that thing.

Most often occuring with a song despised by a person, the song becomes trapped on repeat and after awhile the person becomes to "love" it. The inverse might happen with a song the person likes, it becomes annoying or even maddening to them.

Characters may also build an immunity to people they dislike. Specifically at the start of a series when the main two leads are exact opposites, (One's a straight-laced lawyer with OCD, the other's a wild child, slob who can't hold down a job and they're stuck living together!). After a few adventures the two main characters may become best friends or at least develop an appreciation with the other.

Another variation is with someone who doesn't like babies. They're terrified of responsibility, of the possibility of somehow hurting one and then they spend a few hours forced to take care of an infant and they learn that it's not so bad. Someone may even tell them that one day they'll make a great parent.

Compare I Do Not Like Green Eggs And Ham.

Examples:

Film

  • Easy A had Natasha Beddingfield's "Pocketful Of Sunshine" from a music card at first being called awful by the main character, but after spending a weekend repeatedly listening to the song, she comes to love it and know all the words. She even has it as her ringtone in one scene.

  • Veggie Tales Lord of the Beans: "They took the "What Have We Learned Song"! "I thought you hated that song."...

Live Action Television

  • One episode of How I Met Your Mother had Ted and Marshall go on a road trip in which a cassette was stuck on one song and repeated it over and over again. The two go through this trope cyclically, loving the song, then hating it, then loving it again.

  • The baby examples happens several times over several seasons on Charmed. Specifically dealing with Prue not believing that she'd be a good parent, there are at least two episodes where she's stuck with a child uner her care. A season 4 episode has Leo and Piper taking care of a mechanic baby doll trying to prove to themselves that they are capable of bringing up children in a home that is constantly threatened by demons. (Subverted in that they fail and the doll is destroyed.)

  • In one episode of Community Britta and Troy, the Ship Tease couple for the season, have to hug for the school's promotional video. Unfortunately, the Dean, who's the director, forces them to do it over and over and over again, for hours, before they both break down, crying, and Troy almost throwing up.
Literature
  • After spending a few weeks locked in a small box, removed only to be beaten, Rand Al'thor (of The Wheel Of Time) develops a strong aversion to small spaces. Then he has to spend several hours locked in a confined space and comes out of it without his claustrophobia.

Webcomic
  • In PvP, Francis hates Star Trek TOS until Cole and Brent strap him to a chair and force him to watch all the Star Trek movies (except for Star Trek V).

Web Original

Real Life
  • In psychology, this is known as flooding and is a recognized method for dealing with a phobia. It's better done in a controlled manner, rather than the sensational and dick way that daytime tv shows sometimes does it.
Community Feedback Replies: 16
  • February 16, 2012
    surgoshan
    Stereotypical example for the description: People Hate Babies. The're terrified of responsibility, of the possibility of dropping it, and, come on, the soft spot? If it's not a terrifying doomsday device, why does it come with a self-destruct button? Then they spend a few hours forced to take care of an infant and they learn that it's not so bad. Sure, it's a wet, sticky, constantly-in-danger-of-dying crying machine, but it's essentially harmless.

    Literature
    • After spending a few weeks locked in a small box, removed only to be beaten, Rand Al'thor (of The Wheel Of Time) develops a strong aversion to small spaces. Then he has to spend several hours locked in a confined space and comes out of it without his claustrophobia.

    Real Life
    • In psychology, this is known as flooding and is a recognized method for dealing with a phobia. It's better done in a controlled manner, rather than the sensational and dick way that daytime tv shows sometimes does it.
  • February 16, 2012
    foxley
    In PvP, Francis hates Star Trek TOS until Cole and Brent strap him to a chair and force him to watch all the Star Trek movies (except for Star Trek V).
  • February 16, 2012
    wesnprogamat
    Here's an Idea for a title: "It Grows On You".

    If you want this one: Film
    • Veggie Tales Lord of the Beans: "They took the "What Have We Learned Song"! "I thought you hated that song."...
  • February 20, 2012
    Stratadrake
  • February 21, 2012
    GuesssWho
    This is proportional, not inverse.
  • February 22, 2012
    Medinoc
    Incessant Music Madness may be a subtrope, since the music in question is often very hated by the character.

    Cold Turkeys Are Everywhere might be related too despite the undesirability being situational.
  • February 22, 2012
    HiddenFacedMatt
    ^^ This.
  • February 22, 2012
    Madcapunlimited
    Soo... relationship w/Ear Worm? Can this get some more examples that aren't music?

    Illyria playing Video Games in season 5 of Angel could probably qualify.
  • April 21, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
    Web Original
  • April 21, 2012
    reub2000
    No, I do not think exposure therapy is an example of this trope.
  • April 21, 2012
    Damr1990
    • Parodied on Yu Gi Oh The Abridged Series movie, where Gary Stu was the only kid who didn't liked card games, cue him getting traped watching a duel for five hourse, at the end of wich he finally snaped and started liking them as well and procaliming he will spend all of his money ont the cards while a caption that says "this is precisely the reaction the makers of this movie expected from the general public..." appears
  • August 25, 2015
    randomsurfer
    Exploited Invoked by Amy on The Big Bang Theory. She worms her way into Penny's life, and as Penny continues to be exposed to her Penny warms up and eventually considers her one of her best friends.
    Penny: [talking about Emily] You can't force somebody to like you.
    Amy: What if you just hang around and act like her friend until you wear her down? I mean, next thing you know, you're in her house, you're eating her food and drinking her wine.
    Penny: No, that won't work.
    Amy: You're right. Cheers. [drinks some of Penny's wine]
    Bernadette: Oh, I know. Why don't you use your sales training to go back down there and sell yourself?
    Penny: What?
    Bernadette: Yeah. But instead of selling a drug, you'd be selling Penny. It's cute.
    Penny: It's stupid.
    Bernadette: Well, maybe people would like you more if you didn't crap all over their ideas.
    Amy: I'm gonna go with Penny on this one. Then again, why wouldn't I? I mean, we go way back.
  • August 25, 2015
    eroock
    ^ If Amy did this intentionally, it's technically invoked. Exploited is when the abuse of the trope happens without having it arranged in the first place.
  • August 25, 2015
    randomsurfer
    ^Right, right. Changing it. My thinking at the time I wrote that was that Amy exploited this bit of psychology, i.e. she did it on purpose, but on TV Tropes the proper word for that is invoked.

    • In this commercial for the 2012 VW Passat two guys on a road trip only have a Learn Spanish CD, no music. 13 hours later they're both fluent in Spanish, but still arguing about the CD.
  • August 28, 2015
    MetaFour
    Web Original:
    • Nathan Rabin, writing for AV Club, listened to two songs ten time in a row each and recorded his reactions. Listening to Celine Dion's "A New Day Has Come", he gains a newfound appreciation for the song. On the other hand, re-listening to Nickelback's "How You Remind Me" just makes him hate Nickelback even more.
    • Steve Delahoyde recorded himself over the course of a 5-hour road trip, during which he listened to ABBA's "Dancing Queen" on endless repeat.
      Steve: I find myself really longing for the section when the song ends, and when it starts again. There's like a ten-second gap where there's no sound. Then there's that piano part that comes in, ruins everything again.
  • August 31, 2015
    acrobox
    This has a name. It's Mere Exposure Effect

    EDIT: Which is currently a redirect to a YMMV Song Association page??

    We should fix that to be its own trope. Mere exposure works for things besides songs. And can work for songs in-universe.

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