Created By: Tannhaeuser on July 28, 2010 Last Edited By: Tannhaeuser on July 28, 2010
Troped

Through A Face Full Of Fur

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"How can he blush through a face full of fur?"
--Charlie Brown, on Snoopy's Color Change in Peanuts

Most beasts are covered in fur, most birds in feathers. Thus, if the blood rushes to their skin as a result of effort, anger, embarrassment, or pain, it should covered from view, though if an animal has light-colored, thin fur/feathers, something of the skin tone may still be visible. Some creatures are inorganic, and have no blood to blush with. However, a remarkable phenomenon takes place in the world of Animated beings. There, if a wolf drops a hammer on its paw, or a duck is bilked of a million-dollar prize, or a griffon is caught in the shower without a towel on -- or even if factory whistle is just blowing too strenuously -- the creature will turn bright red, flesh, fur, feathers, or whatever. This phenomenon is usually restricted to the face, but will on some occasions spread over the whole body (in which case it may cause any adjacent water to boil, snow to melt, or eggs to fry).

A variant reaction may take place when a character is frightened, in which case it may turn yellow or white; or freezing, when it may turn blue; or sick, when it may turn green or yellow, or, in extreme cases, plaid.

Though this is primarily an Animation Trope, it will occasionally show up in other media as well.

Anime And Manga
  • Tails in Sonic X blushes at one point when he carries Cosmo up to the ceiling by way of his helicopter tails in order to decorate a room for a party.

Eastern Animation
  • The wolf in Nu, Pogodi! attempts to karate-chop a log, and smashes his hand. It turns crimson, and he has to run a faucet over it to cool it off.

Literature
  • Several times in Winnie The Pooh Piglet (who is presumably made of cloth) is described as "turning pink."
  • The Redwall critters are constantly turning red from rage, green from seasickness, white with fury or fright, and pink with pleasure.

Live-Action Television
  • In one episode of Green Acres, Arnold the pig blushes, with the help of special lighting.

Newspaper Comics
  • In Peanuts, Snoopy is often shown blushing. In one strip, Charlie Brown wonders how anyone can blush through a face full of fur.

Western Animation
  • Flower in Disney's Bambi turns red when being kissed for the first time, the blush travelling from his nose all the way to the tip of his tail.
  • Donald Duck, in his animated shorts, has been seen turning red with anger (obviously!).
  • Professor Fritz Owl loses his temper in Tex Avery's Merrie Melodies short, "I Love to Singa," and his feathered face turns bright scarlet.
  • Jenny from My Life as a Teenage Robot blushes.
  • Blushing is used as a visual device for robots in Transformers Generation One. A simple example would be Seaspray's humanoid love interest noticing him blushing at her in "Sea Change."
    • In Zobovor's epic fanfic, "Children of Cybertron," following Bumblebee blushing, this is Handwaved as energon (the Transformer proxy for blood) rushing to the robot's face. He goes on that to explain it as something Transformers have always done, and were quite surprised to find in common with organic creatures.
  • Sylvester the Cat in "Claws For Alarm," when he sees a "ghost" (actually a number of murderous mice under a bed-sheet), turns white with fear.
  • Spike the Bulldog turns white (including his derby and sweater) from fear of Sylvester (he thinks!) in "Tree for Two."
  • In one episode of '"Tom and Jerry Tales'', Tom and Jerry go through a carnival funhouse and come out so scared their fur is permanently bleached white. They then end up getting a job at the carnival as an albino cat and mouse.
  • Bugs Bunny turns multiple colors from fear and vertigo in "Falling Hare".
  • Claude the Cat psychosomatically turns colors which are suggested by Hubie and Bert in "The Hypo-Cat-Riac."
  • In "Cheese Chasers" Hubie and Bert themselves turn green from indigestion through eating too much cheese.
  • In "Drip-A-Long Daffy" Daffy and Porky, among other reactions, turn green, as a result of the drink forced on them by Nasty Canasta.


I think this is just about ready to launch. Any final comments?
Community Feedback Replies: 29
  • April 1, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    Ummm...this was nowhere near ready to launch. My apologies to those whose examples and opinions were flouted. Please contribute your ideas as to a new description, title, etc.
  • April 1, 2010
    macroscopic
    From the launched page:

    • In Peanuts, Snoopy is often shown blushing. In one strip, Charlie Brown wonders how anyone can blush through a face full of fur.
    • In Light on Quest Mountain, one of the main character's friends is a sort of lizard man who blushes murky brown (red + green) when he is doted over by his mother.
  • April 1, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    Thanks, Macroscopic. I have saved a copy of the page as launched, so I have all the examples from it -- silly of me not to have put them in the re-launch. I'll get right on that.

    Does this need splitting, do you think, for the various colors? If not, "blushing" is obviously the wrong word to use for changing blue or yellow. Can anyone think of a more comprehensive term?

    Should I weed out some of the tenuously related tropes?

    Should I perhaps list the "blushing" by color? E.g. --

    Turning White:
    • Sylvester the Cat in the Looney Tunes short, "Claws For Alarm'', when he sees a "ghost" (actually a number of murderous mice under a bed-sheet), turns white with fear.

    Turning Multiple Colors:
    • Happens to Bugs Bunny in "Falling Hare".
    • Claude the Cat in "The Hypo-Cat-Riac."
  • April 5, 2010
    Evalana
    • In the Disney Fairies books, mention is sometimes made of a fairy's "glow" changing from default yellow to another color to reflect the fairy's mood.
  • April 9, 2010
    Stratadrake
    Since this trope is not restricted to blushing alone, it could be up for a better name. Amazing Technicolor Emotions?
  • April 9, 2010
    dotchan
    • Dragon Ball - So what color does Piccolo blush? Fanon says purple, but off the top of my head I don't remember if he does blush in the anime or not.
  • April 9, 2010
    Surenity
    • Tails in Sonic X blushes at one point when he carries Cosmo up to the ceiling by way of his helicopter tails in order to decorate a room for a party.
    • Under the Turning White subtrope, one episode of '"Tom And Jerry Tales'' has Tom and Jerry go through a carnival funhouse and come out so scared their fur is permanently bleached white. They then end up getting a job at the carnival as an albino cat and mouse.
  • April 10, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    I kind of like Amazing Technicolor Emotions, except that it doesn't quite indicate the idea that the beings changing color are ones that don't normally do so. It's possible that the trope needs to be split. A name is difficult. Kaleidoscope Fur? (For some reason I am now hearing the Beatles singing, "The bear with kaleidoscope fur....") Living Kaleidoscope? Even Its Fur Turned Blue? Bleah...

    Very unwieldy trope. The page quote may not fit any more, now that the trope has expanded to take in other color changes besides blushing.
  • April 10, 2010
    Deboss
  • April 15, 2010
    the grene kni3t
    (This may or may not be worth noting, but) The idea of an animal going white with fear was parodied in one episode of Danger Mouse: Danger Mouse realizes that he and Penfold have gone back in time, and starts stammering and looking shocked. "Chief," exclaims Penfold, "you look quite white!" DM gets hold of himself and replies, "Penfold, I am quite white."

    EDIT: Danger Mouse also plays this straight, with Danger Mouse blushing bright red on a few occasions.
  • April 15, 2010
    amazinglyenough
    Not sure if this counts because he isn't an animal, but in Kings Quest IV, Edgar, the green-skinned son of Lolotte the evil fairy, turns bright red when Lolotte decrees that he and Rosella will be married.
  • April 16, 2010
    Medinoc
    Just a reminder: The show's name is Looney Tunes (think of Merrie Melodies). Looney Toons is a TV Tropes contributor.
  • April 16, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    All right, I really don't think the Disney fairies, Piccolo, or Kings Quest examples really demonstrate the trope I had in mind -- which is yet another reason that Non Human Blushing is a really sucky name. The idea was supposed to be that the creature changing colors was one without visible skin -- i.e., it was covered with fur or feathers, or else made of some inorganic substance. (I'm not quite certain, come to think of it, about the Arnold the Pig or the Lizard-man examples -- do pigs have exposed skin? Do lizards? I thought that pigs were hairy all over, but I am not so sure now.

    Is dividing by color needlessly complicating this?

    Thanks for the reminder, Medinoc -- it's a slip easy to make in a moment of thoughtlessness.
  • April 16, 2010
    the grene kni3t
    I'd say dividing by color isn't really necessary, especially since works that include one kind of color change are likely to include others anyway.
  • April 16, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    On reflection, I think you are quite right, The Grene Kni3t (by the way, I just caught that the 3 is a "yogh"). I think it would be best to bundle the other color changes into the description, and just mention them under each example as they come up.

    I almost think the Charlie Brown thing needs to be the page quote, if we can track down the exact words.

    I think we need to lose the word "blush" entirely, Deboss, as many of the color changes aren't about "blushing" as such. Heh, I thought of Rainbow Complexion, but though that covers the changing colors, it doesn't cover the fact that it's not the skin that's doing it. (Really, these are two different, though very closely related tropes: 1) turning unnatural colors (Elmer Fudd turning emerald green) and 2) things changing colors that naturally don't (Bugs Bunny turning pink). The latter was really more what I was going for, originally.)
  • July 14, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    How about Furface Changes? Furface Complexion? Furfect Complexion?

    By the way, is there a trope about the tendency of a Mary Sue to be a Furry character? Because the perfect trope name for that would be Sue Fur Facial.
  • July 14, 2010
    randomsurfer
    Several times in Winnie The Pooh Piglet is described as "turning pink."
  • July 15, 2010
    Stratadrake
    @Tannhauser: The Furry Fandom has too many fur-based puns of its own already, we don't need them.

    And "furface" is too close for comfort to "furfag"....
  • July 15, 2010
    TJ
    • The Redwall critters are constantly turning red from rage, green from seasickness, white with fury or fright, and pink with pleasure.
  • July 17, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    Stratadrake, I can honestly say I had never heard of that term before in all my born days. Crap. I really thought I had found a title we could use, but I certainly do not want to insult or offend anyone gratuitously.

    Any other suggestions, folks? I want to lose "Blush," which really doesn't suit all the changes. How about Through A Face Full Of Fur?

    Actually, now that I think of it, it would be better to lose "fur," too, if possible -- because sometimes feathers change, and sometimes completely non-organic "skin." Aaaaaarrrrgggghhh, the frustration!
  • July 17, 2010
    TJ
    Right Through The Fur? Damn it, that sounds wrong... Why Is That Blush Visible? Even though blushing isn't the only color change, just say so right at the top of the description and it's still a good word for the title.
  • July 24, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    Illogicolor? Skinpossible? Compliplexions? Kiiiilllll Meeeeee!
  • July 24, 2010
    Aesi
    Emotional Fur Pigmentation? Mood Furring?
  • July 24, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    Furmentation? Aw, crap...
  • July 25, 2010
    LillyS
    My two cents: the title must give people an idea of what the trope is about. That is more important than covering everything. For instance, compare these two:

    Blushing Through Fur

    and

    "Blushing, whitening and other color changes, inexplicably visible through fur, feathers, or completely non-organic skin."

    I know it's not always blushing and it's not always fur, but people can get the meaning and it is better than to have something long and unintelligible. Personally I vote for Through A Face Full Of Fur.
  • July 25, 2010
    the grene kni3t
    I like Blushing Through Fur--it's clear and self-explanatory, even though the trope is broader than that.
  • July 25, 2010
    LillyS
    Yes, Blushing Through Fur might be even better. I was between the two.
  • July 25, 2010
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    I'd suggest: Color Cues -- since they're particularly for the viewer's benefit.

    • Roger Rabbit turns different colors when given alcohol.
    • Daffy Duck also turns different colors when given various substances in his cartoons.

  • July 25, 2010
    Tannhaeuser
    I prerfer Through A Face Full Of Fur to Blushing Through Fur, only because it's more interesting -- and as neither of them are perfectly accurate, I'd rather go with the more interesting one.
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