Created By: 69BookWorM69 on August 1, 2012 Last Edited By: 69BookWorM69 on August 25, 2013
Troped

The Villain Knows Where You Live CROWNERS UP

Villain produces proof he can find someone to carry out a threat against them.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
I found the title I Know Where You Live as a dead internal link (in other words the page already exists), and I consulted the instructions for handling such dead internal links. Since it said to "Click the edit button...", that's what I did. I came back to it later to find the page blank again, but it's not on the Cut List, so I'm a bit puzzled. I thought I was doing things correctly, but evidently not. <shrug> Hence, this YKTTW.

Anyway, I think we need this, as it isn't really covered by other tropes that I have found, though it does get mentioned elsewhere. Please note that I'm only used the working title for now because it has a page already. In other words, I know it sounds like dialogue and some tropers don't like that, but it'll do for now, and yes, I'll tag it for a title change. Honestly, though, I think the original title works quite well in conveying the point.

UPDATE: There are now two crowners for this YKTTW:

1) If you want to vote on the title of this trope, go here.

2) Yes or No: Should the locked page "I Know Where You Live" become a redirect for this trope?

I am aware that putting the locked page to this or any other use is at the admins' discretion, but some commenters below have expressed a preference for using it as the title. I offer the redirect suggestion in a spirit of compromise.


The Villain, having made a threat against The Hero and/or someone the Hero loves, produces proof he can actually find the intended victim(s) and carry it out. Recent photographs of the target(s) at home or in other familiar settings are probably the most popular form of evidence; the recipient(s) will recognize background items, clothing, hairstyle and other details as familiar and recent, and the very existence of the photos implies someone got physically close enough to take them. On the other hand, The Villain may simply say or write the home address, phone number, school name, or other recent identifying information ("Lovely blue leotard your daughter wore to her dance class today. It matches her eyes."). He may even produce some recognizable item belonging to the target(s), thereby proving he's been there once already and can return.

Since executing this trope involves inspiring feelings of fear and intimidation, it is most often performed by The Villain or at his command. If a heroic character does this, chances are that Hero already operates outside ordinary rules (think superhero), or is angry or desperate enough to act without the aid of law enforcement. When invoked against someone with a secret identity, the trope I Know You Know I Know will play a part in the threat. Implying or announcing that he knows such a secret is another means of making the threat hit close to home, and may even imply that the opponent has some way to deal with the target's special abilities (If he knows Clark Kent is really Superman, maybe he also knows about that kryptonite problem too).

While this may be done in conjunction with an Implied Death Threat, it usually appears with more direct threats (of the Shame If Something Happened variety) or explicit threats, so as to underline both the intent and the ability to follow through. If it is not given in person or via telephone, such proof will likely accompany an anonymous threatening letter.

There is often some overlap with Shame If Something Happened, as this trope can serve to bolster the threat and encourage the target's cooperation. In those cases, there's usually something the target can do or some price that can be paid to buy off the threat, if only for a short time. If this trope is used alone, often there is no price that can be paid; the threat is coming and the purpose is more to terrify beforehand rather than trying to get the target to do (or stop doing) something.

Compare and contrast The Call Knows Where You Live. Where this trope is about demonstrating the ability to strike (i.e. the baddies have done their homework and show their work to prove it), The Call Knows Where You Live is about going ahead and actually doing it (possibly without any warning). Either way, the situation demands some kind of response. It's also possible to do this trope first, then go ahead and pull the other one (by carrying out a threat). If the villain just wants to get the drop on the hero, he'll just act (TCKWYL); if the villain wants to play with the hero's head first, he'll do this first (or something like it).

Examples

Anime and Manga
  • In Mystery Of Mamo, Mameaux skips the threat and simply has Frenchy hit the gang's hideout with napalm to show them that he really means business when he sends hitmen after them for giving him a phony Philosopher's Stone.

Comics
  • Sin City: The district attorney finally gets Marv to confess to the murders actually committed by Kevin and Cardinal Roark (and their murders, which he was guilty of) by turning off the recorder and showing him a picture of his mother in the crosshairs of a sniper rifle. Marv breaks his arm in three places, but signs.

Film
  • In the film Ice Cream Man about a Humanitarian evil ice cream man the eponymous man uses the exact line: "You little turds are gonna have to realize you can't run from the ice cream man! I know where you live! If you tell anyone, I'll get your mom and dad!"
  • In Grosse Pointe Blank the assassin protagonist tries to convince his psychiatrist to continue seeing him (the psychiatrist freaked out when his patient revealed his profession). The protagonist mentions doctor-patient confidentiality as a reason why their continued visits wouldn't be a problem and then adds, "And besides, I know where you live". Given the protagonist's admitted profession and the fact that he would know the psychiatrist by name, that's not so hard to believe.
  • Subtly done in Layer Cake. The protagonist is going to meet his girlfriend at a hotel rendezvous when he gets abducted by a Diabolical Mastermind gangster, and at the end of their "interview", he's casually dropped off at his home, which the other guy wouldn't know unless he'd been keeping close tabs on him.

Literature
  • Early in Aunt Dimity and the Deep Blue Sea, Bill shows Lori a printout of a threatening email he received earlier that morning, the latest in a series. The note came with recent photos of the cottage, Lori, their nanny Annelise and the twins on their ponies. The text reads:

    You came like a thief in the night to cast me into the abyss. You chained me in darkness, but no earthly chains can hold me anymore. I have risen.
    Behold, I am coming soon to repay you for what you have done. All that you love will perish. I will strike your children dead and give your wife a like measure of torment and mourning. I have the keys to Death and Hades, and I will blot your name from the book of life forever.
    Your nightmare has begun. There is no waking.
    Abaddon

  • Villains in Discworld tend to try this on Sam Vimes. Always a terrible idea, since he's a Papa Wolf and that acts as a Berserk Button for him.
    • In Night Watch Carcer tells Vimes: "I can see your house from here"
    • Happens several times in Thud!:
      • The dwarves send a suicide squad to assassinate his family... causing him to pursue their sorry asses all the way into Koom Valley, and filling him with so much primal vengeful rage, he ''almost'' murders them.
      • Two troll enforcers for The Breccia attempt to intimidate Vimes by saying this... right in the middle of the Watch house while surrounded by officers.
      • The Low King of the Dwarves almost pulls this on Vimes in a moment of anger before catching himself and mentioning diplomatically how nice it would be to meet his family. Vimes isn't fooled, but lets it slide.
    • In Guards! Guards! it's implied that Lord Vetinari got the Thieves' Guild leaders to agree to his plan by quietly suggesting that he knew where their loved ones lived.
  • Late in Lynn Shepherd's 2012 novel The Solitary House, protagonist and investigator Charles Maddox finds his housemaid vomiting in the kitchen, and he learns from another servant that she had been accosted while buying provisions at the markets and a package was added to her basket. The package proves to contain the little finger from Charles' right hand, which had been forcibly amputated in an attack on him several days previously. Charles recognizes the contents ("A second, closer look eradicates all doubt."), and the threat:
    The package left in Molly's basket carried more than one message, and the loudest and clearest of them all is that his unseen adversary is closing in. Closing in on Charles, and closing in, now, on all those around him. He could have killed Molly today, if he chose, just as he could have killed Charles on the City Road.

Live-Action TV
  • A subtle one in the Remington Steele episode "Elegy in Steele": Major Descoine comes to the agency's office, promises Laura and Steele he'll kill them both by noon that day, and leads them on a chase around the city. One surreal stop is a richly-furnished Victorian-looking apartment in an otherwise abandoned building. On looking around, the detectives notice that the framed photographs scattered about the living room show them at work on recent cases (in clearly recognizable stills from previous episodes), and the penny drops:

    Steele: He's been FOLLOWING us! The bloody bugger's been SPYING on us!
    Laura: It gives me the creeps.
    The Minor: (Enters carrying a loaded tea tray) Oh, "cream," did you say? (Stops as Steele and Laura turn on her, Steel pointing his gun at her) It's right here on the tray.

  • Buffy: One of the first things Angel does when he turns evil is to go into Buffy's room while she's sleeping, draw a detailed picture of her, and leave it for her to find in the morning.

Indexes on launch: The Index Is Watching You, Fear Tropes, I Have Your Index
Community Feedback Replies: 64
  • August 1, 2012
    JonnyB
    In Spider-Man, The Green Goblin discovers Spiderman's secret identity. He crashes through the wall of Parker's house, terrorizing Aunt May, and shortly afterward kidnaps Mary Jane Watson.
  • August 1, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Um, not quite. This is more about the bad guy showing that he can carry out a threat before actually terrorizing/torturing/kidnapping/killing the target.
  • August 1, 2012
    Avurai
    The scene in the reboot, The Amazing Spider-Man, where Peter asks Dr. Curtis Connors about what could overpower a lizard, both seeming to know who the other really is, is slightly more appropriate. ""There's a rumor of a new species in New York. It can be aggressive if threatened."

    It's unique in that it's the inverse. Instead of the villain knowing the truth about the superhero's secret identity, it's their normal selves letting each other in on the fact that they're aware of each other's super-identities.
  • August 1, 2012
    abk0100
    Buffy: One of the first things Angel does when he turns evil is to go into Buffy's room while she's sleeping, draw a detailed picture of her, and leave it for her to find in the morning.
  • August 1, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    In Discworld, the inscription on the statue of general Tacticus sais: " I can see your home from here". Also, I know we had this. What could have happened to it? And the title describes the trope so well,m it should be allowed despite being dialogue... (hate the new rules)
  • August 1, 2012
    tryourbreast
    I think there are Real Life examples on this. On internet occasions are people trying to find one person's personal information whom they don't like, and after it's been found out, they use it to threaten that person. Listing specific examples can be risky, but I think just talking about it macroscopically is fine
  • August 1, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    Thanks for the replies.

    @ Avurai That's a bit more like it. I have yet to see the reboot; I'll borrow it from my local public library when they add it to their collection. Sounds like I'll need to add a sentence or two about mask-wearers.

    @ abk0100 Definitely! Will add it.

    @ Mozgwsloiku Please tell me more, as I haven't read any part of Discworld (Yeah, I have some odd lacunae in my education, but mine aren't intentional like Sherlock Holmes'). Is Tacitus trying to intimidate people (like Big Brother in 1984)?

    Oh, and I also think the rule is problematic, and this is a concrete example of why. The name as it stands is very effective at conveying the creepiness of the behaviour, and the behaviour involves providing intimate and recent/time-sensitive information to make the point (That's why photos are so often the method of choice for pulling one of these; the threat recipient can recognize the background/clothing/hairdo/other details in the picture to know where and when the photo was taken.)

    @ tryourbreast I'm sure there are, and I'll add an overall mention of the real world phenomenon at the bottom of the examples list. I'm thinking it's appeared in some ripped from the headlines/based on a true story show, but I can't come up with specifics. If you do, please share them.
  • August 1, 2012
    randomsurfer
    In the film Ice Cream Man about a Humanitarian evil ice cream man the eponymous man uses the exact line. "You little turds are gonna have to realize you can't run from the ice cream man! I know where you live! If you tell anyone, I'll get your mom and dad!"
  • August 2, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    69BookWorM69 - Most probably, since in another book, the villain Carcer used the same line on Vimes during a rooftop confrontation.
  • August 2, 2012
    FastEddie
    No dialog-like names for tropes, please.

    Stalker Revelation could work.
  • August 2, 2012
    Avurai
    Not-So-Secret Identity (Threat)?
  • August 2, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    Stalker Revelation is flat and way too general. A revelation of what? The stalker's identity? Not this trope. Finding said stalker in the bushes? Nope.

    Not-So-Secret Identity (Threat) might only apply to superhero examples like the Spiderman reboot one given above. This is more generally applicable than that.

    If, as I suspect, the pronoun is the problem, it could be called Villain Knows Where You Live, with the I Know Where You Live page as a redirect. I think it loses a lot of the creepy impact that way, though.

    @ Avurai Looking at the Spiderman example again, it occurs to me that there's also an element of I Know You Know I Know to it. Do you agree? I ask because for this to be effective directly against a superhero target (as opposed to threatening a Love Interest or parent or some such), the person issuing the threat has make it clear the the Mask is no protection, or so I believe.
  • August 2, 2012
    zarpaulus
    Discworld also implied this was how Lord Vetinari got the Thieves Guild's leaders to play by his rules.
  • August 2, 2012
    nitrokitty
    Stalker Revelation is a terrible name and is completely misleading. Villain Knows Where You Live is better, but still loses a lot of the impact. I'm inclined to agree with bookworm, I Know Where You Live, even as dialog, is still the best name out there.
  • August 3, 2012
    Arivne
    ^ It doesn't matter if it's the best trope title ever created. If it sounds like something someone might say it's illegal, period. If launched with that title, Fast Eddie will Cut List it instantly. He has also been known to discard tropes with such titles from YKTTW, especially after he's given a warning, so the name needs to be changed now, even if what it's changed to isn't very good.

    Villain Knowledge Threat would be somewhat clunky, but would give some idea of what the trope was about. Surely someone can come up with something better.
  • August 3, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ I'll change it, but under protest. I have half a notion to hold a title crowner in hopes that the original title wins, especially since the bloody thing already has a page. Nothing's wrong with I Know You Know I Know either.
  • August 3, 2012
    randomsurfer
    It only "has a page" because it's locked so nobody can recreate it.
  • August 3, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ The lock must be recent, since it let me put content into once, albeit briefly.

    Anyway, the more I think about it, the more I prefer the pronoun, since it allows for heroic characters doing it. I was primarily thinking of villains when I drafted it originally, but of course the Spiderman reboot example does suggest a heroic character might do it, given the right circumstances.

    @ Avurai Do you happen to know whose line you quoted (the doctor's or Peter's)? If it was Dr. Connor's, do you know exactly what Peter's line was? If they're both pulling it on each other, I'd like to be able to show that clearly in the dialogue.
  • August 3, 2012
    TheHandle
    • Villains in Discworld tend to try this on Sam Vimes. Always a terrible idea, since he's a Papa Wolf and that acts as a Berserk Button for him.
      • In Night Watch Carcer tells Vimes: "I can see your house from here"
      • In Thud, the dwarves send a suicide squad to assassinate his family... causing him to pursue their sorry asses all the way into Uberwald, and filling him with so much primal vengeful rage, he almost murders them.
  • August 4, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Thanks. Examples added.

    Am wondering if any pronoun would have the dialogue taint. In other words, would the title They Know Where You Live also be busted? I still like the pronoun idea, so that it's as widely applicable to the behaviour (i.e. villains primarily, but others can do it too) and retains the creepiness as well as the concision.
  • August 4, 2012
    nitrokitty
    Another example from Discworld:
  • August 4, 2012
    captainsandwich
    Is this a snowclone of The Call Knows Where You Live, also the tropes are kind of similar
  • August 5, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ I did not intend this to be a bad snowclone. I think the two are related, or in some circs could be. This one is about demonstrating the ability to strike (i.e. the baddies have done their homework and show their work to prove it), and TCKWYL is about going ahead and actually doing it. Either way, the situation is Serious Business and demands some kind of response. I'd say it's also possible to do this trope first, then go ahead and pull the other one (by carrying out a threat). If the villain just wants to get the drop on the hero, he'll just act (TCKWYL); if the villain wants to play with the hero's head first, he'll do this first (or something like it).

    More generally, homes/hometowns and the people associated with them are familiar and safe, so when a bad guy either threatens to go there or actually does, it's a very intimate sort of threat (Up To Eleven, really). They both spoil the tranquillity (or the illusion of tranquillity) associated with the home space and the private life.

    I guess that makes the two siblings, or candidates for a compare/contrast sentence.
  • August 5, 2012
    zarpaulus
    Yet another Discworld example

    • In Guards Guards it's implied that Lord Vetinari got the Thieves Guild leaders to agree to his plan by quietly suggesting that he knew where their loved ones lived.
  • August 5, 2012
    Avuai
    @Bookworm: Dr. Connors says it to Peter, as an implied threat to back down before he has to hurt him. Peter suspects that something not-quite-right is afoot and since Dr. Connors' profession makes his ability to bioengineer an intergral part of his capabilities, addled with a lessening mental stability, Peter becomes suspicious and concerned. Seeing as they both worked together to develop the technique and syrum to enable cell reproduction (which would allow Dr. Connors to grow his arm back), and the audience knows is actually the cause of the metamorphosis, Connors appears to be the most likely candidate and Peter appears to be sympathetic to him and genuinely worried... Connors seems to believe he won't be able to control himself and is warning Peter not to try and do anything that could get him hurt once Connor's loses control of himself, but with a tinge of malicious intent from his more animalistic side seeping through. Their respect for each other is an essential part of understanding the situation.
  • August 5, 2012
    nitrokitty
    I cleaned up the Discworld examples a little. Hope you don't mind.
  • August 5, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Thank you. As I said, I am unfamiliar with the works, so I'm in no position to be specific about them. I couldn't even tell you if they are listed in the order of occurence. Besides, aren't wikis team efforts by nature?

    ^^ So they're both wearing masks. Is Dr. Connors any supervillain I'd recognise? He doesn't sound like DocOc.
  • August 5, 2012
    randomsurfer
    ^Connors is The Lizard, the Big Bad of the recent Amazing Spider-Man film. Not having seen it myself either - in the comics he doesn't wear a mask, it's a complete change of physical appearance, personality, and mental ability (kinda-sorta like The Hulk in that regard).
  • August 6, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Thanks for that. Any idea what Parker's relevant line is? I'd like the example to be quite clear, especially since we have so few as yet.

    I know I've seen this a lot, but nothing else is coming to mind just now. Typical.
  • September 4, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    Bump.
  • September 20, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    New Literary example:
    • Late in Lynn Shepherd's 2012 novel The Solitary House, protagonist and investigator Charles Maddox finds his housemaid vomiting in the kitchen, and he learns from another servant that she had been accosted while buying provisions at the markets and a package was added to her basket. The package proves to contain the little finger from Charles' right hand, which had been forcibly amputated in an attack on him several days previously. Charles recognizes the contents ("A second, closer look eradicates all doubt."), and the threat:
      The package left in Molly's basket carried more than one message, and the loudest and clearest of them all is that his unseen adversary is closing in. Closing in on Charles, and closing in, now, on all those around him. He could have killed Molly today, if he chose, just as he could have killed Charles on the City Road.
  • October 3, 2012
    zarpaulus
    Any chance of this thing going up?
  • October 3, 2012
    morenohijazo
    Why was the former page cut instead of renamed? Damn, it seems to me too drastical to directly remove the page.
  • October 3, 2012
    captainsandwich
    I never said it was a bad Snow Clone, I just said it was a Snow Clone.
  • January 25, 2013
    Talvieno
    I was looking for a trope such as "I know where you live", which is what I expected this one to be called. "I know where you live" is a stock phrase I see with relative frequency, and the villain producing proof he can get ahold of the character in question, but not killing them (doing it to scare them) happens even more frequently than that. I usually see it in horror flicks - particularly bad ones. Unfortunately, those aren't really the kind of movie I watch much, so I can't provide any specific examples.
  • January 25, 2013
    Talvieno
    Here's a list of stuff - just the results of a quick google search.

    • In the 1995 film "Tommy Boy", a character named Michelle says "I know where you live and I've seen where you sleep."
    • In the 1939 film "The Saint Strikes Back", Simon Templar says "Well, I wouldn't run away, Miss Travers, because I know where you live."
    • In the film "Happy Feet", the Leapord Seal says, "Remember dumplings, I know where you live."
    • In the live action television series "Law & Order", one of the characters (Jessica Sheets) says, "Ah, but Jack... I know where you live"
    • In the 1997 film "Grosse Pointe Blank", Martin Q. Blank says "I know where you live."
    • In the 1960 film "The Apartment", C.C. Baxter says, "I know where you live and that you had chicken pox when you were 8."
    • In the 1986 film "Blue Velvet", Dorothy says, "[...] I know where you live and I know ways to get you and I know ways to kill you."
    • (Dale Gribble says "You don't know who I am, but I know where you live" twice in a King of the Hill episode (animated series).

    That's pretty often, I think, especially for a quick Google search. If "I know where you live" isn't the best title, perhaps "X knows where Y lives" or something along that line would suffice... or perhaps a similar quote from a movie. The trouble with this is - if anyone uses it, they almost always include the stock phrase "I know where you live".
  • July 11, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    @ zarpaulus I hope so, since I started it, and I usually just help out with others' YKTT Ws. For the record, I didn't go off in a snit: Real Life intervened (mother's four hospital stays, another death in the family, computer problems...).

    @ Talvieno I was doing the same thing, found the blank page, added content, returned later and found the content had disappeared (after which the page was locked), and learned of the "no dialogue titles" rule being effectively etched in stone. I hoped the use of "they" would be sufficient to avoid the rule and preserve the sense of menace in the title itself (as well as encompassing Bad Ass heroes who do this), but I don't know.

    To all and sundry: I wonder if I should make it clear how this differs from Shame If Something Happened? In that trope, there's usually something the target can do or some price that can be paid to buy off the threat, if only for a short time. In this one, often there is no price that can be paid; the threat is coming and the purpose is more to terrify beforehand rather than trying to get the target to do (or stop doing) something. What do you lot think?
  • July 11, 2013
    OlafMerchant
    Not to be a nitpicker, but the entry about Discworld's examples has one minute error in it. The suicide squad of dwarves bit, Mr. Vimes chased them into Koom Valley, not Uberwald.
  • July 11, 2013
    ryanasaurus0077
    Anime and Manga
    • In Mystery Of Mamo, Mameaux skips the threat and simply has Frenchy hit the gang's hideout with napalm to show them that he really means business when he sends hitmen after them for giving him a phony Philosopher's Stone.
  • July 12, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^^Thanks. I've fixed it.

    ^ Example added. TYVM

    Hats, anyone?
  • July 15, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    I finally dug up some of the dialoue from the 2012 Spiderman reboot. If I understand the suggestion correctly. Peter Parker is supposed to be performing this trope in his question, with Dr. Connors warning him off. Is this a subtle example or not?

    Dr. Curt Connors: Shouldn't you be at school?
    Peter Parker: No, I got a...I got a free track. I wanted...I wanted to ask you a question. How would a predator track a reptile?
    Dr. Curt Connors:: Oh, they don't. Most reptiles are at the top of their respective food chain, kings of their domain.
    Peter Parker: But they gotta have vulnerabilities, right?
    Dr. Curt Connors: Why the sudden interest in the cold blooded?
    Peter Parker: Just asking a question. I got...I got...I got school stuff, biology profiles to do. So, because of the cold blood, would they react to sudden changes in temperature?
    Dr. Curt Connors: You'd have to catch one first.
    ...
    Dr. Curt Connors: Did you know there's a rumor of a new species in New York? Beautiful and quite large.
    Peter Parker: What do you know about it? Have you seen it?
    Dr. Curt Connors: Well, it's not yet classified. But it can be aggressive, if threatened.
  • July 15, 2013
    Hodor
    There's a subtle example in Layer Cake. The protagonist gets abducted by a Diabolical Mastermind gangster, and at the end of their "interview", he's casually dropped off at his home, which the other guy wouldn't know unless he'd been keeping close tabs on him.

    Also, to elaborate on the Grosse Pointe Blank example, the protagonist, an assassin, is trying to convince his psychiatrist not to stop seeing him (the psychiatrist was freaked out when his patient told him his profession). The protagonist mentions doctor patient confidentiality as a reason why their continued visits wouldn't be a problem and then adds, "And besides, I know where you live".
  • July 16, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ I gather the Layer Cake abduction was from somewhere other than the protag's home or its environs, yes?
  • July 16, 2013
    Hodor
    Yes- iirc he was meeting his girlfriend to have sex at a hotel- he got kidnapped from there when he answered the door for what he thought would be room service.
  • July 17, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ OK I've added those two films, but can you clarify: does the assassin in Grosse Pointe Blank offer any specific evidence of his knowledge (say, rattling off the address, for example)? I've never seen this movie, so I don't know. I've revised the example as if he didn't (though he wouldn't necessarily need to, given their prior relationship) but I'd like to be sure.
  • July 17, 2013
    zizoloziz
    In Dangan Ronpa, Monobear produces videos of the corpses of the characters' family and friends and the ruins of their homes to encourage the students to murder each other.
  • July 21, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ If the families are already dead, that would be The Call Knows Where You Live. Did Moonbear threaten with evidence of personal knowledge before killing the families? If so, that would be this trope.
  • July 21, 2013
    DAN004
    So this trope's relation with TCKWYL would be Show Dont Tell? (in this case "Do, Don't Tell")
  • July 21, 2013
    Chabal2
    • Sin City: The district attorney finally gets Marv to confess to the murders actually committed by Kevin and Cardinal Roark (and their murders, which he was guilty of) by turning off the recorder and showing him a picture of his mother in the crosshairs of a sniper rifle. Marv breaks his arm in three places, but signs.
    • Similarly, one Spiderman story had the main villain coerce the Sandman by threatening to kill his mother.
  • July 21, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Do you have more specifics on that second example? Do you recall what the villain told the Sandman (or showed him) to prove the threat could be serious?

    ^^ Something like that. If TCKWYL is Luke's aunt and uncle being incinerated by stormtroopers (as in the film), this trope would be if Luke got a message from Vader or Tarkin, like a video file of them at home showing them still alive. Does that help?

    it sounds like this should go on the Canonical List Of Subtle Trope Distinctions after launch.
  • July 21, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Sounds good enough. :D
  • July 21, 2013
    nitrokitty
  • July 22, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    I'm still troubled by the title. Would They Know Where You Live (which is general enough to include heroic characters doing this) cause it to be cut? Should i have a title crowner?
  • July 22, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Crowner plz.
  • July 24, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Have two:

    1) If you want to vote on the title of this trope, go here.

    2) Yes or No: Should the locked page "I Know Where You Live" become a redirect for this trope?
  • July 28, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Bump.

  • July 28, 2013
    DAN004
    Launch plz.
  • August 2, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ I'd like more votes on the crowners first. It looks like only two or three people have responded.
  • August 9, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Bump for crowners. Please vote.
  • August 12, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Title crowner: "They Know Where You Live" is ahead, but only 5 votes so far.

    Single Proposition crowner: Unanimous support for using the locked 'I Know Where You Live" page as a redirect, but only 4 votes so far.
  • August 24, 2013
    Momochi
    Excuse me, but I don't think The Call Knows Where You Live is a sister trope. Actually carrying out this threat is not necessarily a call; the villain can visit the hero's house in the middle of the story (which is what I was looking for when I found this page).
  • August 25, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Uhm, I never called it a sister trope: I wrote a compare and contrast paragraph to distinguish the two (and I plan to put it on the Canonical List Of Subtle Trope Distinctions).
  • August 25, 2013
    FastEddie
    Listen, the no new dialog-like names things is not up for debate. See Administrivia.No New Stock Phrases, and Administrivia.Naming A Trope
  • August 25, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    @ Talvieno, DAN004, et. al. Moderator FastEddie has ruled both crowners ineligible, so the title stays as it is.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=mk80v40ii4d4ujup13dup3bf