Created By: StevenT on March 13, 2012 Last Edited By: DAN004 on February 14, 2016
Troped

Stopped Reading Too Soon

A message gets misinterpreted because the guy reading it reads it too quickly and misses vital info

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
DAN 004 wuz ere takin over ur druft

Index: Poor Communication Kills

Often, a written/typed message only makes sense if it is read all the way through. However, not everyone has the patience to finish reading. They'll fasten on the part of the message they saw first, and act upon it, not realizing that there is more important information in the rest. Often justified in fiction by the writer of the message using poor syntax, Wall of Text, or "burying the lead" so that the most important information is on the next page. May lead to Dramatic Irony (as the audience will often gets to see the rest of the info), Cue Card Pause, and Worse with Context (or Better With Context).

This can also apply to audio or video recordings, and communication transmissions (i.e over the phone, or with Voice with an Internet Connection).

Attention Deficit... Ooh, Shiny! characters are prone to this. See also Read the Fine Print and Read the Freaking Manual. Related to Out-of-Context Eavesdropping.

Compare and contrast Prophetic Fallacy, Lost In Transmission, Conveniently Interrupted Document, Plot-Based Photograph Obfuscation and Plot-Based Voice Cancellation for when it's not the fault of the reader/watcher/listener, but rather the document/transmitter itself.

Not to be confused with It Gets Better, when the audience stops following a story too soon.


Exampies:

Anime and Manga
  • In Love Hina Christmas Special: Silent Eve, Su and Sara find Naru's letter to Kintaro and only bother to read one word in the middle of the page (love) before jumping to conclusions, setting off the whole Idiot Plot.
  • In Bakuman。, both the protagonists stop reading only a few pages into the book Iwase gave Takagi, one because he doesn't like the genre she wrote in, and the other because it was too "deep" for him. Thus they both miss the message she inserted between pages about halfway through the book.
  • In Ranma , Genma read about "The Cat Fist Technique" and decided to teach it to Ranma. It required tying him up with fish sausage and locking him in a basement full of hungry cats. Genma didn't read the next page, which stated "Of course, anyone who does this is a complete lunatic who should have their head examined."

Comic Book
  • In Ghost World, Seymour discovers Enid's Significant Sketchbook at one point and feels crushed when he sees a portrait of himself showing him as depressing and alone. When confronting Enid, she points him to the later pages in her sketchbook which has many more portraits of Seymour in a completely different light, which he didn't see when initially skimming the pages. Seymour is visibly touched by this discovery.
  • In Scott Pilgrim, Matthew Patel sends Scott an email explaining the basic plot of the series. Scott skims it before declaring it boring and deletes it, thus Scott is completely blindsided when the first fight over Ramona starts.

Film
  • Hellboy: a variation; Abe Sapien reads off the description for the Hellhound from a book to Hellboy. Hellboy supposedly kills the hellhound before Abe finishes, after which he mentions the last few sentences about resurrection.
  • In Shrek, the title character accidentally eavesdrops on Fiona talking to Donkey, and hears the part about how "'princess' and 'ugly' don't go together." Thinking that she secretly hated him and was only pretending to like him, he promptly storms away, when her very next sentence would have clued him in that she was talking about her own shapeshifting curse.
  • Lampshaded in Dogma:
    Loki: "Cardinal Glick cuts ribbon on Catholicism, Wow! campaign." And?
    Bartleby (sighing): You have to keep reading.
  • Alvin from Alvin and the Chipmunks panics when he can't find his favorite baseball card. It gets worse when he sees the headline on that day's paper which says that a notorious cat burglar has struck again. He goes to sleep and has a Miami Vice inspired dream where he and Theodore track down the burglar. After he wakes up, he finds his missing baseball card and Simon shows him the full headline. Alvin missed the part saying the burglar was caught.

Literature
  • In The Incredible Journey a housekeeper finds only one page of a two-page note. This leads to confusion about who is going to be taking care of three pets for two weeks. This sets the plot in motion- the pets escape and have adventures before anyone realizes they're gone.
  • Goosebumps, "How to Kill a Monster", the two main characters are trapped inside their grandparent's house with a monster inside. They find a letter from their grandparents telling them they left and warns them about the monster inside. After killing the monster and escaping from the house and into the swamp at night, they continue reading the letter explaining their grandparents lock them inside for their protection and to prevent them from leaving the house because there are more monsters in the swamp and they come out at night. After they finish reading, the kids have no idea what they are going to do next.
  • Parodied twice in A Series of Unfortunate Events. Once, in-universe, a vital note is hidden behind chapters and chapters about somebody picking a snack. On another occasion, the author actually buries us in boring information before writing a note to his sister.
  • Science Made Stupid by Tom Weller, a parody of grade school science textbooks, includes a page on how to build a backyard nuclear reactor. It gives directions for materials and assembly; then only after assembling the fuel elements does it tell you that the control rods must be inserted first.

Live-Action TV
  • There's the Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode "Fear Itself" where Giles reads the information on Gachnar but doesn't read the inscription with its 'actual size' caption. Buffy also fails to let him finish reading later on before she breaks the seal and summons Gachnar on accident.
  • Almost happens in Blackadder Goes Forth, when Lieutenant George is defending Blackadder at his courtmartial. George reads a prepared speech that concludes with "...Captain Blackadder is guilty!" then, after a pause, realises something's amiss, turns the page over and continues: "...of nothing..."
  • In The Twilight Zone episode "To Serve Man", the translator stops translating the titular book after figuring out the title. Then she does the rest. Cue the Wham Line: " It's a cookbook!"
  • Kaamelott: Arthur goes to Merlin to ask for an energizing potion because he's feeling down lately. Merlin looks for the potion and tells him to drink it. Arthur asks if he's sure, Merlin replies that yes, it says "one" on the label for "in one go". The as Arthur downs it, Merlin reads the word after that, which is "drop". Arthur spends the rest of the episode superexcited until the prospect of bedding his wife comes up, which cures him completely.

Radio
  • In one episode of The Navy Lark Povey's scheme to drum the HMS Troutbridge crew out of the navy falls apart because he only read the front of the orders sheet, there was information on how they could get out of it on the back. Even worse The Admiral admits that he makes the same mistake constantly, and only noticed some important stuff when he turned some paper over to use as a drink's coaster.

Video Game

Web Video
  • Unskippable: The episode for Death By Degrees plays this straight during the discussion of an upcoming spy mission.
    Character: ...execute a video recon...
    Paul: Execute! Got it!
    Graham: No, no, no! Execute reconnaissance, not just execute! Stop... stop killing people!

Western Animation
  • On American Dad! a guy stopped reading Carrie, literally in the middle of a sentence. Thus, he dropped pigs from the ceiling onto Stan at the prom instead of pigs' blood.
  • The Simpsons
    • In the episode "Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment", a 200-year-old law banning alcohol is discovered in the Springfield Charter. It took until the very end of the episode to discover that it was repealed 199 years ago.
    • In the episode "Blood Feud", Homer writes an angry letter to Mr. Burns, which starts out as a fake thank you note. Mr. Burns at first reads the thank you part, and is deeply touched, until he later discovers the following sentences.
    Dear Mr. Burns... I'm so glad you enjoyed my son's blood and your card was just great. In case you can't tell, I'm being sarcastic. You stink! You are a senile, buck-toothed old mummy with bony girl-arms, and you smell like an elephant's butt.
  • One ploy that Wile Coyote uses on the Road Runner in the Looney Tunes cartoon is to leave a pile of bird seed laced with Acme Earthquake Pills. The target ingests the entire bait, then departs unaffected. The coyote disgustedly eats the remaining pills, about half the bottle. A moment later, his eye catches the fine print at the bottom of the label: "Caution: Not effective on road runners." Cue the coyote's leg quivering ominously.
  • A telegram delivered to Tom Cat in the Tom and Jerry cartoon "Million Dollar Cat" states that Tom has been bequeathed one million dollars. This news leaves Tom overjoyed, and he flings roses around the room and kisses a goldfish. Jerry Mouse reads the telegram in its entirety, and smugly points out the last line: "Payment stops if the cat brings harm to any living thing, even a mouse." Jerry goes into complete Jerk Ass mode, confident that he can torment Tom with impunity.
  • In Mike Tyson Mysteries, "Is Magic Real?", Mike receives a message from an old Wizard asking if magic is real. When Mike finds the Old Wizard working in a parking garage, he assumes it must be magic if he was able to find him by chance until the Old Wizard points out that he told Mike where to meet him in his message. When Mike correctly guesses the Old Wizard's backstory, he also assumes it must be magic until the Old Wizard points out again that he included his backstory, in comic form, in his message.
Community Feedback Replies: 92
  • March 13, 2012
    SKJAM
    In Bakuman, both the protagonists stop reading only a few pages into the book Iwase gave Takagi, one because he doesn't like the genre she wrote in, and the other because it was too "deep" for him. Thus they both miss the message she inserted between pages about halfway through the book.
  • March 13, 2012
    KZN02
    • Hellboy: a variation; Abe Sapien reads off the description for the Hellhound from a book to Hellboy. Hellboy supposedly kills the hellhound before Abe finishes, after which he mentions the last few sentences about resurrection.
  • March 13, 2012
    lebrel
    "In Love Hina Christmas Special: Silent Eve, this is what sets off the whole Idiot Plot."

    Just a tip: This is not a good way of writing an example; it doesn't tell you anything about how the trope was used. What was the character reading, what was the actual message, and what did they misinterpret it as?

    For instance (making this up because I haven't read Love Hina): "Bob receives a message from Alice telling him to meet her behind the gym at noon, and gets so excited thinking it's a confession of love he rushes off to buy roses and neglects to read the back of the page, where she rebukes him for his behavior towards Carol and challenges him to a water-pistol duel." Hilarity Ensues."
  • March 13, 2012
    Met
    In The Incredible Journey a housekeeper finds only one page of a two-page note. This leads to confusion about who is going to be taking care of three pets for two weeks. This sets the plot in motion- the pets escape and have adventures before anyone realizes they're gone.
  • March 13, 2012
    chicagomel
    There's the Buffy The Vampire Slayer episode 'Fear Itself' where Giles reads the information on Gachnar but doesn't read the inscription with its 'actual size' caption. Buffy also fails to let him finish reading later on before she breaks the seal and summons Gachnar on accident.
  • March 14, 2012
    HaggisMcCrablice
    A character in American Dad quit reading Carrie, literally in the middle of a sentence. Thus, he dropped pigs from the ceiling onto Stan at the prom instead of pigs' blood.
  • March 14, 2012
    PsiPaula4
    Add to the description-

    Attention Deficit Ooh Shiny characters are prone to this.
  • March 14, 2012
    Koveras
    Not to be confused with It Gets Better, when the audience stops following a story too soon.
  • March 14, 2012
    HiddenFacedMatt
    This seems familiar, but I'm not quite sure from where...
  • March 14, 2012
    Alvin
    I could get more detailed, but in an episode of MASH an unexploded bomb lands in the 4077th compound and Hawkeye and Trapper John have to defuse it from step-by-step instructions read to them by Col. Blake. Due to Blake reading it a step at a time, and the way the manual is written, they do something and then Henry reads "But first..." Also maybe this coincides some with Lost In Transmission ?
  • March 14, 2012
    OmarKarindu
    The Hellboy example is from the film, not the comics.
  • March 14, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    In the Polish comedy Nic Smiesznego ("nothing funny") this is how the protagonist gets fired from one of the movies he worked with. He was sent to find a scenery that matched the script and then spent several hours driving the director to show him a forest. What he didn't notice was that the sentence continued on the next page: ...of crosses.
  • March 14, 2012
    TBeholder

    Also, Seen It A Million Times as a part of the gag where a Lethal Chef fails to read the whole recipe before trying to follow it - and, of course, does terribly wrong something that becomes obvious upon reading the next line.
  • March 14, 2012
    SKJAM
    Hmm, expanded description perhaps...

    Often, a written message only makes sense if it is read all the way through. However, not everyone has the patience to finish reading. They'll fasten on the part of the message they saw first, and act upon it, not realizing that there is more important information in the rest. Often justified in fiction by the writer of the message using poor syntax, or "burying the lead" so that the most important information is on the next page.

    ---

    • In Ranma One Half, Genma trains Ranma in the Cat Fist from a manual, not noticing that the manual continues on the next page with a dire warning not to use this training method.

    • At least one Glurge story involves an impoverished young person being given The Bible or other inspirational work by a relative who claims "there is all the treasure you need within". The recipient gets no further than reading the title before shelving the book. Years later, it's discovered there's money tucked between the pages.
  • March 14, 2012
    jbrecken
    In Raiders of the Lost Ark, the Staff of Ra the bad guys used was the wrong length because they only got to read the message on one side of the headpiece instead of both.
  • June 28, 2012
    TBeholder
    seems good enough to launch. is it abandoned?
  • June 28, 2012
    Ryusui
    The Raiders example isn't this - the Nazis didn't have the other half of the message, having made their duplicate headpiece from the burns on their agent's hand.
  • June 28, 2012
    sliz225
    Parodied twice in A Series of Unfortunate Events. Once, in-universe, a vital note is hidden behind chapters and chapters about somebody picking a snack. On another occasion, the author actually buries us in boring information before writing a note to his sister.
  • June 29, 2012
    randomsurfer
    An allegedly Real Life Secret Test Of Character utilizes this: The instructions are to read the entire test before starting to answer. What follows is a series of crazy questions with multiple choice answers, and/or instructions like "stand on one leg and recite the pledge of allegiance." The last line is "put your name on the the top line, then don't answer any other questions."
  • June 29, 2012
    Alvin
    I've had one like that pulled that on me, and my dad was once a vice-principal so I think I've seen a copy of one of those floating around somewhere.
  • June 30, 2012
    Lumpenprole
    In one Road Runner skit, the Coyote sets out some birdseed bait spiked with "Earthquake Pills". But the Road Runner eats the bait with no effect. Disgusted, the Coyote swallows the entire jar of Earthquake Pills only to notice too late the fine print on the label: "Does not work on roadrunners".
  • July 2, 2012
    surgoshan
    Related to Read The Fine Print.
  • July 2, 2012
    NimmerStill
    The Colbert Report and The Daily Show lampoon Real Life journalists for only reading page 1 of the Supreme Court's decision on the Affordable Care act ("Obamacare") and thus thinking incorrectly that the latter is declared unconstitutional. Colbert parodies it by reading comically inadequate amounts from A Tale Of Two Cities (just "it was the best of times") and War And Peace (just "war" from the title).
  • July 2, 2012
    NimmerStill
    Lampshaded in Dogma:
    Loki: "Cardinal Glick cuts ribbon on Catholicism, Wow! campaign." And?
    Bartleby (sighing): You have to keep reading.
  • July 2, 2012
    Rognik
    The Bakuman example is more of a subversion of this trope. Normally, this trope is when the message is in the actual text, and results from a person not fully reading the message. In that case, though, neither character read far enough in the book to find the loose slip of paper (which is later found by the book being knocked off the shelf).

    I can't think of any other examples off hand, but I support this as a trope.
  • July 4, 2012
    abk0100
    The The Twilight Zone episode that named the To Serve Man trope: the protagonist is wary about trusting the aliens that recently arrived, but once an alien book's title is translated as "To Serve Man," he's convinced enough to get onto their spaceships and take a trip to their home planet. The rest of the book is translated seconds too late to stop him.
  • July 15, 2013
    XFllo
  • July 15, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • One ploy that Wile Coyote uses on the Road Runner in the Looney Tunes cartoon is to leave a pile of bird seed laced with Acme Earthquake Pills. The target ingests the entire bait, then departs unaffected. The coyote disgustedly eats the remaining pills, about half the bottle. A moment later, his eye catches the fine print at the bottom of the label: "Caution: Not effective on road runners." Cue the coyote's leg quivering ominously.
  • July 15, 2013
    TheTitan99
    In the episode of The Simpsons "Blood Feud", Homer writes an angry letter to Mr. Burns, which starts out as a fake thank you note. Mr. Burns at first reads the thank you part, and is deeply touched, until he later discovers the following sentences.

    Dear Mr. Burns... I'm so glad you enjoyed my son's blood and your card was just great. In case you can't tell, I'm being sarcastic. You stink! You are a senile, buck-toothed old mummy with bony girl-arms, and you smell like an elephant's butt.
  • July 16, 2013
    DAN004
    I wonder why this trope isn't called Too Long Didnt Read instead.

    EDIT: Oops, it's already there?
  • July 16, 2013
    Stratadrake
    No, that's currently a redirect for Wall Of Text (though why, I have no idea).

    ^^^ I don't think that counts. That's Strangled By The Fine Print or something.

    • In one episode of My Little Pony Friendship Is Magic, Twilight Sparkle is visited by a post-apocalyptic future version or herself trying to deliver an important message, but the time-travel spell pulls her back before she can complete it ("Whatever happens, don't -- !"). Naturally, Twilight assumes the worst about this future, when the real message is "don't worry about the future"; future Twilight's post-apocalyptic appearance is actually just the result of several zany (but otherwise mundane) mishaps that occur as a direct result of Twilight's crazy speculation about this assumed future.
  • July 16, 2013
    Lophotrochozoa
  • July 16, 2013
    DAN004
    Personally I wanted to remove the Too Long Didnt Read redirect and use it for this trope. It may be really hard, though.
  • July 16, 2013
    Omeganian
    Related to Prophetic Fallacy.
  • July 17, 2013
    notShemp
    • Goosebumps, "How to Kill a Monster", the two main characters are trapped inside their grandparent's house with a monster inside. They find a letter from their grandparents telling them they left and warns them about the monster inside. After killing the monster and escaping from the house and into the swamp at night, they continue reading the letter explaining their grandparents lock them inside for their protection and to prevent them from leaving the house because there are more monsters in the swamp and they come out at night. After they finish reading, the kids have no idea what they are going to do next.
  • July 20, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Film

    • Crimson Tide had a variation of this: the U.S.S. Alabama receives a coded order to launch nuclear missiles at a Russian nuclear installation controlled by military units loyal to a rogue ultranationalist leader. A second message comes shortly after, but due to an attack by a Russian sub loyal to the rogue leader, the radio is damaged and decoding the second message is impossible beyond a partial exerpt. The XO believes this message could likely have been a retraction of the previous orders due to the Russian government retaking control of the installation, while the Captain believes the original orders should be followed since the second message is unknown--which becomes the central conflict in the film.

    (Note: this example fits the laconic of a message being "cut short", although the description seems to suggest the trope is about willful or ADD-like focusing on only a part of a given message. I assume both situations thus apply here?)
  • July 20, 2013
    DAN004
    Related to Read The Fine Print or (sometimes) Read The Freaking Manual.
  • July 20, 2013
    RandomSurfer
    Some of the items in Cue Card Pause might fit better here (Buffy as was mentioned in the OP, MASH, etc.)
  • December 22, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    • Kimi Ni Todoke: Episode 4 in the anime. The honest shy heroine with loner background is stopped by her classmate in the school corridor, and asked questions about circulation of rumors. The talk shifts to her relationship with a duo of semi-delinquent girls who recently befriended her, just as the duo comes by from a distance, managing to overhear that the heroine doesn't like them. Incidentally, a teacher drags them away to lend a hand, and the impact on the relationship is complemented by them later finding out that the heroine was basically saying she didn't just like them, she liked them very-very much.
    Probably overlaps with Out Of Context Eavesdropping here.
  • December 22, 2014
    Daefaroth
    Comic Books:
    • In Scott Pilgrim, Matthew Patel sends Scott an email explaining the basic plot of the series. Scott skims it before declaring it boring and deletes it, thus Scott is completely blindsided when the first fight over Ramona starts.
  • December 22, 2014
    CrypticMirror
    In one episode of The Navy Lark Povey's scheme to drum the HMS Troutbridge crew out of the navy falls apart because he only read the front of the orders sheet, there was information on how they could get out of it on the back. Even worse The Admiral admits that he makes the same mistake constantly, and only noticed some important stuff when he turned some paper over to use as a drink's coaster.
  • December 22, 2014
    Duncan
    In The Last Starfighter, a transmitted message gets cut off, and Xur jumps to conclusions...
    Lord Kril: The last Starfighter...
    Xur: Is dead! The last Starfighter is dead! Nothing can stop us now! Ahead full to Rylos!
  • December 22, 2014
    Chabal2
    Kaamelott: Arthur goes to Merlin to ask for an energizing potion because he's feeling down lately. Merlin looks for the potion and tells him to drink it. Arthur asks if he's sure, Merlin replies that yes, it says "one" on the label for "in one go". The as Arthur downs it, Merlin reads the word after that, which is "drop". Arthur spends the rest of the episode superexcited until the prospect of bedding his wife comes up, which cures him completely.
  • December 22, 2014
    HeroGal2347
    In The Twilight Zone episode "To Serve Man", the translator stops translating the titular book after figuring out the title. Then she does the rest. Cue the Wham Line: " It's a cookbook!"
  • December 22, 2014
    dalek955
    • In Shrek, the title character accidentally eavesdrops on Fiona talking to Donkey, and hears the part about how "'princess' and 'ugly' don't go together." Thinking that she secretly hated him and was only pretending to like him, he promptly storms away, when her very next sentence would have clued him in that she was talking about her own shapeshifting curse.
  • December 22, 2014
    eroock
    Compare Invisible Ink (once it gets launched)

    This trope can be caused by a Wall Of Text.
  • December 22, 2014
    Folamh3
    Already have, I think. Conveniently Interrupted Document covers case where a document is damaged or a character is interrupted whilst reading it.
  • December 22, 2014
    troacctid
    The Buffy episode in question has its own page that can be potholed: Buffy The Vampire Slayer S 4 E 4 Fear Itself
  • December 24, 2014
    bwburke94
    "To Serve Man" is well-known enough to not need to be spoiler-tagged.
  • December 25, 2014
    randomsurfer
    ISTR that they didn't stop translating after "To Serve Man," it was just that as of when they announced that that was the name of the book, that's all they had managed to translate. At the end of the episode when they discover that it's a cookbook it's because the translators had continued to work on it offscreen.
  • March 8, 2015
    DAN004
    May lead to Worse With Context.
  • March 8, 2015
    gallium
  • March 8, 2015
    TonyG
    Related to Cue Card Pause.
  • March 8, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^^^^^^ This may be the Super Trope to Conveniently Interrupted Document.

  • March 8, 2015
    TonyG
    On The Simpsons episode "Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment", a 200-year-old law banning alcohol is discovered in the Springfield Charter. It took until the very end of the episode to discover that it was repealed 199 years ago.
  • March 8, 2015
    DAN004
    Laconic sounds like it's Conveniently Interrupted Document.
  • March 9, 2015
    eroock
    Film:
    • In Ghost World, Seymour discovers Enid's Significant Sketchbook at one point and is crushed when he sees a portrait of himself showing him as depressing and alone. When confronting Enid, she points him to the later pages in her sketchbook which has many more portraits of Seymour in a completely different light, which he didn't see when initially skimming the pages. Seymour is visibly touched by this discovery.
  • March 9, 2015
    SteveMB
    I'm not sure how this differs from a combination of Read The Freaking Manual (for cases where the character quits reading before getting to a critical item of information) and Conveniently Interrupted Document (for cases where the document before getting to a critical item of information).

  • March 9, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ This is their Super Trope.
  • March 10, 2015
    eroock
    I think there are two slightly different narrative purposes at work.
    • Conveniently Interrupted Document interrupts/conceals parts of the document in order not to reveal crucial plot points too early.
    • In "Stopped Reading Too Soon" the missing information increases drama for the characters. The audience might be well aware of the information withheld.
    The other distinction is that the former trope is brought on by outside forces while the latter is a stupidity by the character itself. Can all this still be covered in one trope?
  • March 10, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ I think CID is when the document is physically interrupted, such as it being unfinished, or parts of it being burned, or (for video or audio recording) it frequently buzzes or it cuts off in the middle.

    This trope is simply characters stopped reading and then jumping into assumptions.
  • March 10, 2015
    robinjohnson
    • Almost happens in Blackadder Goes Forth, when Lieutenant George is defending Blackadder at his courtmartial. George reads a prepared speech that concludes with "...Captain Blackadder is guilty!" then, after a pause, realises something's amiss, turns the page over and continues: "...of nothing..."
  • March 10, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    ^^ So it's technically interrupted, but "incomplete" would be more accurate.
  • March 11, 2015
    LadyEvil
    • In Ranma One Half, Genma read about "The Cat Fist Technique" and decided to teach it to Ranma. It required tying him up with fish sausage and locking him in a basement full of hungry cats. Genma didn't read the next page, which stated "Of course, anyone who does this is a complete lunatic who should have their head examined."
  • March 11, 2015
    DAN004
    Who's managing this?
  • March 11, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    Hasn't been edited ins July 2013, so I think we can call this Up For Grabs.
  • March 11, 2015
    DAN004
    Grabbing this unless someone beats me to it
  • April 22, 2015
    MetaFour
    • Mystery Science Theater 3000 The Movie: Cal Meachem receives a dozen crates, containing the parts to assemble an interociter. There's a quick cut to just after the unpacking: parts are strewn across the floor, and Cal is reading the instruction manual. Tom Servo then quips (speaking in Cal's voice), "'But before unpacking...' D'oh!"
  • April 22, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ What happens after that?
  • April 22, 2015
    NESBoy
    Nothing really happens. Cal just tells his colleague Joe how many parts the interociter is made up of (2,486, to be precise), after which Crow pretends that Joe keeps crushing some of the parts with his feet. Here's a clip of the scene in question.
  • April 23, 2015
    wrm5
    Web Video:

    • Unskippable: The episode for Death By Degrees plays this straight during the discussion of an upcoming spy mission.
      Character: ...execute a video recon...
      Paul: Execute! Got it!
      Graham: No, no, no! Execute reconnaissance, not just execute! Stop... stop killing people!
  • April 23, 2015
    muddycurve424
    I don't think tl;dr quite fits. Something doesnt have to be too long for a person to not read it all the way through. They could be interrupted, or the part that they did read shocked them so much they didnt read the rest, etc
  • April 23, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ you have a point.
  • April 23, 2015
    Candi
    "Missed the Whole Message" could work as a title, and could apply to tape recordings and such as well as written and printed text.
  • April 23, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ With some forced thinking I can see that the "whole" in the title makes sure that the message is actually whole, instead of being not whole in some way (from the whole slew of the "compare" tropes up there).

    Just in case though, I wanna hear other ppl's opinions.
  • April 23, 2015
    Folamh3
    Pardon me, but I think we might already have this.

    Conveniently Interrupted Document covers cases in which a document is interrupted by the reader failing to read the entire thing. However it might be worthwhile to split it into two tropes.

    EDIT: Never mind, I noticed I already commented on this awhile ago.
  • April 23, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ those cases shall fall here.
  • April 23, 2015
    wrm5
    Reading Conveniently Interrupted Document, there's very, VERY little actual overlap there.
  • April 24, 2015
    muddycurve424
    Possible title: Should've Read the Whole Thing or Should've Kept Reading

    Edit: If we're debating names, shouldn't we change the tag to Better Name?
  • April 24, 2015
    captainmarkle
    I tried to fix some formatting as best I could, but with the Simpsons quote I don't think I actually made a difference.
  • April 24, 2015
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • A telegram delivered to Tom Cat in the Tom And Jerry cartoon "Million Dollar Cat" states that Tom has been bequeathed one million dollars. This news leaves Tom overjoyed, and he flings roses around the room and kisses a goldfish. Jerry Mouse reads the telegram in its entirety, and smugly points out the last line: "Payment stops if the cat brings harm to any living thing, even a mouse." Jerry goes into complete Jerk Ass mode, confident that he can torment Tom with impunity.
  • April 25, 2015
    Arivne
    Corrected improper Example Indentation in The Simpsons example.
  • June 23, 2015
    eroock
    Bump
  • June 23, 2015
    DragonQuestZ
    Should this have real life examples? I'm not sure, as it could lead to accusations of Quote Mining... which I admittedly might do (to people who take only the first part of a certain director's quote to claim he hates a franchise, when the full line shows the opposite).
  • June 24, 2015
    notShemp
    • In Mike Tyson Mysteries, "Is Magic Real?", Mike receives a message from an old Wizard asking if magic is real. When Mike finds the Old Wizard working in a parking garage, he assumes it must be magic if he was able to find him by chance until the Old Wizard points out that he told Mike where to meet him in his message. When Mike correctly guesses the Old Wizard's backstory, he also assumes it must be magic until the Old Wizard points out again that he included his backstory, in comic form, in his message.
  • February 6, 2016
    notShemp
    Bump.
  • February 6, 2016
    DAN004
    I'd like indices.
  • February 6, 2016
    BKelly95
    Western Animation
    • Alvin from Alvin And The Chipmunks panics when he can't find his favorite baseball card. It gets worse when he sees the headline on that day's paper which says that a notorious cat burglar has struck again. He goes to sleep and has a Miami Vice inspired dream where he and Theodore track down the burglar. After he wakes up, he finds his missing baseball card and Simon shows him the full headline. Alvin missed the part saying the burglar was caught.
  • February 7, 2016
    Lumpenprole
    Literature: Science Made Stupid by Tom Weller, a parody of grade school science textbooks, includes a page on how to build a backyard nuclear reactor. It gives directions for materials and assembly; then only after assembling the fuel elements does it tell you that the control rods must be inserted first.
  • February 7, 2016
    Chabal2
    Inverted in a season 1 episode of Blackadder, when two knights overhear only the last part of King Richard's conversation with his suddenly hard-of-hearing wife about their son Edmund's success as Archbishop of Canterbury, and how happy he is that he'll never have to say "WHO WILL RID ME OF THIS TURBULENT PRIEST!?!". The knights instantly head off to kill Edmund.
  • February 7, 2016
    DAN004
  • February 14, 2016
    Kartoonkid95
    My Little Pony Friendship Is Magic: In "hearts and Hooves Day", the Cutie Mark Crusaders find a storybook about a prince and princess who fell in love with each other thanks to a love potion, and decide to use it on Big Macintosh and Cheerilee. It's only afterward that they read on and find out that the prince and princess were so in love with each other, that their respective kingdoms fell into ruin because they literally couldn't stop looking at each other.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=m7b8tgz7isr2wwj9atm2ka8q