Created By: mzywiol on May 19, 2013 Last Edited By: Arivne on May 25, 2013

Biblical Event Reinterpreted

When a work of fiction (usually science-fiction) contains some alternative explaination of a well known biblical event.

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Some works of fiction (usually SF, set in the future) contain discoveries or revelations that may shed some light on events described in the Bible, that they might have looked differently than described, or actually contained some Applied Phlebotinum and had just beed interpreted as miracles by archaic people.

Because of the nature of the trope, the following examples contain unmarked spoilers.

Examples

Film
  • Prometheus implies that there has been some connection between The Engineers and the events on Earth from 2000 years earlier. Underlined additionally by the events taking place around Christmas.

Literature
  • In Dan Simmons' Hyperion the religiously heavy "Priest's Tale" chapter introduces a quasi-alien race that "lives the way of the crossshape" and when one of them dies, he is resurrected after three days.

Video Games
  • "The Truth" in Assassin's Creed II gives us an interpretation of who Adam and Eve were and what Eden and the Apple from the Tree of Knowledge actually were.

Community Feedback Replies: 21
  • May 19, 2013
    AgProv
    Not sure if I can do this, please delete or advise me to delete if this goes against tvtropes convention. But...

    Fan Works. The Good Omens fanfic I shall endure to the end spends three chapters on the issue of the Great Flood as seen by Noah, his family, and two mysterious extra crewmen on the Ark (the demon Crowley and the angel Aziraphile) who set about deconstructing the Biblical account with a vengeance.
  • May 19, 2013
    Astaroth
    In the first Assassins Creed game Al Mualim claims that several biblical miracles, including Moses turning his stave into a snake, the parting of the Red Sea, and Jesus turning water into wine, were illusions created using 'Pieces of Eden'.
  • May 19, 2013
    MorningStar1337
    I think that "Reimagined" should be at the front.
  • May 19, 2013
    SharleeD
  • May 19, 2013
    Tuckerscreator
    • The Halo 'verse implies that the parasites and Installation 00 are the flood and the Ark respectively. There does not seem to be a figure for Noah, however. The Librarian also mentions residing in "Eden", right by Mount Kilimanjaro.
  • May 19, 2013
    WeAreAllKosh
    Live-Action TV

    • Given that it was revealed in Babylon 5 that Vorlons could appear to different races as their versions of angelic beings ("The Fall of Night", "War Without End Part II"), there's an implication that whenever angels appeared to humans (including in scripture), it was really Vorlons "shepherding" our younger race for their purposes.
  • May 20, 2013
    Arivne
    Literature
    • Arthur C Clarke's short story "The Star". An interstellar expedition discovers that the star that led the Wise Men from the East to Bethlehem was a supernova that wiped out the alien civilization on one of the planets orbiting the star.
    • In his book Worlds in Collision, Immanuel Velikovsky proposed that some events in the Old Testament of The Bible were caused by the planets Venus and Mars passing close to the Earth.
  • May 20, 2013
    Tuomas
    No Such Thing As Wizard Jesus is another related trope.

    Film
    • The premise of The Man From Earth is that the protagonist is an immortal man, who has lived for the last 14 thousand years. He reveals this to a group of friends, and later on tells them the real story of Jesus, which is drastically different from what it says in the Bible. One of the friends is a devout Christian, who refuses to accept the story, as it would totally undermine Christianity as a religion.
  • May 20, 2013
    TrueShadow1
    • Played For Laughs in Saint Young Men. In this series, Jesus is deathly afraid of water so he used his divine powers to walk on water instead of swimming. And the sky splitting when he was baptized by John the Baptist was actually God checking up on him since He knew about Jesus' fear of water. In the present day, when he tried swimming in a pool, he split the pool ala Moses.
  • May 21, 2013
    Koveras
    • This is all over the Old World Of Darkness, but especially in Demon The Fallen: Cain was cursed to become the first vampire for killing Abel; the Creation took place in five days, not seven; Lucifer loved humanity even more than God did and rebelled against Him for their sake; the Nephilim killed Grigori (who were Lucifer's agents) and thus ruined the Rebellion's last chance of success; the Flood was aimed at Cain and his vampire spawn, the Antediluvians, but it failed to kill them, etc.
  • May 21, 2013
    Tuomas
    Comic Books
    • In The Unwritten, Pullman is revealed to be Cain, but the reason he killed Abel is different than in the Bible, and there was no god involved in the event.
  • May 21, 2013
    Tuomas
    Literature
    • Erich von Däniken, the writer who popularized the Ancient Astronauts theory, has written several texts where he claims Old Testament visions of God and angels are actually descriptions of spaceships and aliens.
  • May 21, 2013
    Koveras
    ^ You can use &a uml; (without space) to generate ä that works in YKTTW.
  • May 21, 2013
    Tuomas
    Thanks!
  • May 21, 2013
    Duncan
    Not biblical, but in Pastwatch The Redemption Of Christopher Columbus a time traveler shows up in a Zapotec Indian God Guise.

    Also related to Beethoven Was An Alien Spy.
  • May 23, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Accoring to one possible Origin Story of DC Comics' The Phantom Stranger, he is The Wandering Jew.
  • May 23, 2013
    Tuomas
    The Wandering Jew is a Medieval legend though, not a biblical story.
  • May 23, 2013
    Topazan
    ^Which may make it an example in of itself.

    There are Real Life academics who try to explain mythological events from a scientific perspective. Velikovsky is a well-known example.

    Is this trope just about the Bible, or should it be expanded to other myths?
  • May 24, 2013
    IlGreven
    Would Pieta Plagiarism be a subtrope?
  • May 25, 2013
    Koveras
    ^ Nah, Pieta Plagiarism is a Shout Out to or a pastiche of a biblical story via the roundabout way of Michelangelo's statue. This is about incorporating actual biblical events into your backstory with a twist.
  • May 25, 2013
    IsaacSapphire
    The example listed above for Pastwatch The Redemption Of Christopher Columbus doesn't seem to be an example, but that book does have an example of this in passing (discovering it is the initial cause of one character's renown) of discovering the actual basis of Noah's Flood.
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