Created By: AlvaSeptember 16, 2012
Nuked

Chelseaed

A character's bonds with someone is severed.

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Trope
Named for the Twilightian character/Volturi member who could cut personal bonds. When someone is Chelseaed they can no longer relate to the person they were Chelseaed from, as they would feel like complete strangers to them. Not necessarily so for the other person.
Community Feedback Replies: 10
  • September 16, 2012
    aurora369
    I don't know this character.
  • September 16, 2012
    Rognik
    1. Needs a better write-up or an example of this trope
    2. Needs a better name. I can't even attempt to say this one.
  • September 16, 2012
    norsicnumber2nd
    I got the name was meant to be "Chelsea'd" after a while, but 'to Chelsea' isn't a verb, and without the description telling me it was a reference to Breaking Dawn, the best I could think of was the football club down South as to the relevance of the name. Much like with 'Allireaed' (which, frankly, I have no idea), not enough people will get the reference, even with the explanation. Many characters also do this, like Lily in How I Met Your Mother, and without supernatural powers.

    From your description it also doesn't seem like you're saying when char. A's bond with char. B was broken by char. C, just the bond has been broken. Broken Bond or Cut The Cord or something like that might be a better name.
  • September 16, 2012
    MorganWick
    Personally, I had a lot more trouble trying to figure out how to pronounce Allireaed (seriously?) than this. Still, Bad Trope Namer.
  • September 16, 2012
    abloke
    I thought it was something to do with the football club.

    So, is this about people being made to forget their ties with someone?
  • September 16, 2012
    norsicnumber2nd
    Yeh, I thought it was about Chelsea FC, too, after I'd decrypted the name. My suggestions from before, though not awfully good, could be replacements until a great inventive name is discovered.
  • September 16, 2012
    norsicnumber2nd
    Also, what's the point of this one? I don't know, it just says "When someone is Chelseaed they can no longer relate to the person they were Chelseaed from ". Is there a reason this person's bond has been broken? Yes, there are usually many so is this just for any reason?
  • September 16, 2012
    Alva
    Let's call it Broken Bond.

    It made enough of an impression that interpersonal bonds can be broken (in fiction, anyway) that it deserves analysis. While certain there are examples elsewhere, the ones I can think of right now are Twilightian: Edward tried to break his bond with Bella in New Moon, (and opinions vary on whether he partially succeeded given the nature and front cover of Eclipse); and Chelsea does it with every new guard member of the Volturi, so they will feel attached and loyal to their new coven and indifferent to former family members, friends and allies.

    In practically every vampire novel I've read, this is what happens to a person when they are turned into a vampire; if it doesn't happen of its own accord, the person will try to sever the bonds themselves out of concern for the still-humans' safety. That could make for an: A) It happens naturally as a consequence of something; B) Someone does it directly, because that is how their superpowers work, with or without consent; and C) An individual tries to cut their own bonds with someone, for whatever reason.

    As for Alirea, (which post doesn't show up in a search so I suppose it's deleted), she reminded me of the Soulless Men from The Wheel of Time series; they can escape notice because, in that universe, apparently the soul is what makes someone register as a person in your mind. Simply, one can't notice them because the brain rules them out as irrelevant, even while they kill you. We could call it "What Kind of Lame Power is Irrelevancy Anyway?" if you prefer.

    (PS. You can pronounce it "aliray-ad". I agree that it is a bad Trope Name, though.)
  • September 16, 2012
    Alva
    Real Life example (type A): someone who suffers from retrograde amnesia will no longer perceive people they have known all their lives prior to becoming amnesiac, as people they know at all. One example of this is √ėyvind Aamot, who saw his own mother as a stranger after getting retrograde amnesia.
  • October 7, 2012
    norsicnumber2nd
    If you're insistent on the powers thing (though, as I pointed out, Lily in How I Met Your Mother has the startling ability to make people not care about each other) then you should want to make it more specific. As vampires, too, are the only example I can think of, you should change the name to Broken Bond - or perhaps Vampiric Bond Broken, give it a beautiful re-write and shove it in the Vampire Tropes.

    I suggest it be about where "a vampire or vampires break the bonds between themselves or another vampire with someone else (living or undead) for one of three reasons, or a mixture of all: a) they believe that they are putting the other person in danger, as they are a vampire b) they believe that interacting too close with the other person could lead to exposure or 3) they want the other person to have undying loyalty towards them or their 'team', so they have to break and tie off all residual bonds to previous groups they were part of. Vampires have the ability to do this through vampiric power (e.g. Chelsea of Breaking Dawn) and through will power coupled with the fact that they are, indeed, a vampire and so it should not take that much effort to get a human off their back."

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