Created By: unclerupee on August 9, 2011

Ant And Dec Ordering

The names of a famous double act are always said in the same order, never the other way round.

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Trope
In a famous double-act, the names are ALWAYS said in a certain order, to a point where it would sound very odd the other way round. This can apply to other things that come in twos, like Egg and Cress. Who has a Cress and Egg sandwich?

Named for the two popular British presenters, who have stated that they even stand on stage/set in the same order EVERY TIME to stop people from mixing them up!

Examples

  • Ant and Dec, obviously
  • Bill and Ted
  • Cane and Able
Community Feedback Replies: 30
  • August 9, 2011
    ChocolateChip
    Abbot and Costello
  • August 9, 2011
    randomsurfer
  • August 9, 2011
    foxley
    Traditionally comedy duos were listed with the straight man first: Laurel And Hardy, Abbott And Costello, etc.
  • August 9, 2011
    BFisch
    Averted in Red Vs Blue - "Blue vs. red; nobody says red vs. blue. It sounds silly when you say it backwards."

    Don't know that this quite fits your description.
  • August 9, 2011
    Heatherly
    • Simon and Garfunkel.
  • August 9, 2011
    Psychobabble6
    Yeah, I agree with randomsurfer. Seems more like a human need to arrange things than a trope. Also, not that this matters, but it's Cain and Abel.
  • August 9, 2011
    Aielyn
    It is People Sit On Chairs right now. There may be room for an actual trope, though.

    What are particularly common ways to sort such duos? For instance, both "Abbott and Costello" and "Simon and Garfunkel" are shorter followed by longer. Can you think of cases of it being the other way around? That is, where a noticeably longer name comes first? I suspect that it's particularly common to put the longer name second. Note, though, that this gets inverted when it's appended to another word, like Bacon and Egg McMuffin, probably because it keeps the lengths from getting too far apart.

    In short, while simply having a "preferred" order for a duo is PSOC, having it occur for a specific reason would probably be a valid trope. Of course, having multiple tropes for various identifiable patterns would be absurd, so they would be types of pattern within the trope, instead.
  • August 10, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    Levinson And Link breaks your short-then-long rule.
  • August 10, 2011
    robybang
    Maybe if the trope was about characters fighting for a certain billing order, it would be more tropable. For example, in Dudley Do Right, the characters accidentally get picked up by an agent as a comedy act and each character that gets in only agrees to if they get top billing.
  • August 10, 2011
    JonnyB
    • Hope and Crosby
    • Martin and Lewis
    • Amos and Andy

  • August 10, 2011
    Aielyn
    Bookworm - there'll always be the occasional exception. And the fact that it's a scriptwriting duo makes the point, since it's neither a work name nor a pair of comedians/actors/presenters.
  • August 11, 2011
    foxley
    Morecambe And Wise also breaks the short-then-long rule.
  • August 11, 2011
    KamenZero
    hmmm, i dunno. "short then long" doesnt seem that much more tropable than "the names are always this order".
  • August 11, 2011
    Aielyn
    On its own, I agree, KamenZero... but if it's about (and I don't suggest naming the trope for this, as it would be a Bad Snowclone) sorting algorithms of member names in a duo in general, it might just eke its way into being a trope.

    I chose the Short-and-long example as one that is easy to think of. There are, naturally, exceptions... but they almost always end up following other patterns. For instance, I notice that both inversions mentioned so far are in alphabetical order. So is Abercrombie and Fitch, another example that breaks the pattern I mentioned. An exception that isn't in alphabetical order is Standard and Poors, the rating agency... but in that case, "Standard" wasn't a person, and the name came about as a merger between "Standard Statistics Bureau" and "HV and HW Poor Co.", thus explaining the order.
  • August 11, 2011
    smashingmelons
  • August 11, 2011
    peccantis
    Who and whatnow ordering??
  • August 11, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    I wonder if it isn't alphabetical order, but more of sound thing. The second names in Levinson And Link and Abercrombie and Fitch are single-syllable and provide a sort of audible close to the duo name. Kinda like those baby naming conventions, such as three-syllable first name with short last name or one syllable middle name and two syllable last name.

    That said, I'm not sure there's a trope here either, given the many patterns posited.
  • August 11, 2011
    ajmint
    • Richard and Judy
    • Paul and Barry (Chuckle)
    • Jake and Amir
    • Mitchell and Webb
    • Armstrong and Miller
    • Vic and Bob

    ...and just about any double act ever. Hell, I even know two pairs of identical twins, and their names are always said in the same order!
  • August 11, 2011
    JonnyB
  • August 11, 2011
    SunnyV
    It's spelled Cain and Abel, by the way.
  • August 11, 2011
    jaytee
    Needs A Better Title, stat. No idea who Ant and Dec are.

    Also, I'm not convinced this is a trope to begin with. The people calling PSOC are right on target.
  • August 11, 2011
    JonnyB
    ^ I will agree with jaytee on his first point. Definitely needs a better title.

    Not exactly sure if it's a trope, per se, but it is definitely a phenomenon.

    @foxley: Your list failed to support your thesis; Stan Laurel was the stooge of the pair.
  • August 12, 2011
    foxley
    @Jonny B: Stan's primary role was to set up situations for Ollie's reactions.
  • August 12, 2011
    callsignecho
    Maybe if this was about how weird it is when the order is reversed...that might be tropeable. But right now I agree with those who say People Sit On Chairs.
  • August 12, 2011
    azul120
    Hall and Oates
  • August 13, 2011
    unclerupee
    I now come to agree with the People Sit On Chairs view. Maybe someone could just edit the "comedy duo" trope's description to add this insight?
  • August 13, 2011
    CommanderPanda
    Jay and Silent Bob

    Penn and Teller

    Roger and Ebert

  • August 13, 2011
    JonnyB
    ^ Strangely, Siskel and Ebert, I've also heard as Ebert and Siskel.
  • August 13, 2011
    Bruxist
    Simon and Garfunkel
  • August 13, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Siskel and Ebert is one of the few non-Chairs examples. When their first show Sneak Previews started, they flipped a coin for top billing; the plan was to reverse the billing after four years, but by then "Siskel and Ebert" just sounded right by dint of repetition. (To all but a few.) Some of their later shows were technically called Ebert and Siskel but they were always Siskel & Ebert to the general public.

    Also Roger Ebert is an actual film historian, buff, and all-around know-it-all. (In the best possible sense of that phrase.) While to Gene Siskel reviewing films was just another newspaper assignment until such time as he became well known for it.

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