No Flash, All Substance


(permanent link) added: 2010-10-03 10:56:01 sponsor: neoYTPism (last reply: 2013-08-16 15:28:25)

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Laconic: Minimalist art, not-so-minimalist content

Also, I'm open to title suggestions.

This is for works that really don't bother with the technical quality, (audio, video, etc.) or whatever it is that's relevant to their respective medium; however, they clearly do show quality in their stories, or their characters, or perhaps even in their style aside from the most obviously superficial aspects of it. In certain cases, this can allow for a Cast of Snowflakes. The Internet in general specializes in this, mainly because there's no budget fueling the creative process, even though there are mainstream works that do this as well.

It's worth noting that this is pretty subjective, especially in regards to older works for who's art is considered outdated by contemporary standards.

Related to Stylistic Suck for when emphasizing the content over the art is intentional. See Stick Figure Comic for when the art in question uses stick figure drawings.

Examples

Comic Books
  • Knights of the Dinner Table. Minimalist art, usually with characters in stock poses and no movement. The interplay between the characters so accurately depicts the Real Life interaction between RPG gamers that many readers have written in and said "You must have been listening in at our last gaming session!"

Web Comics

Web Original
  • Three of The Escapist's regular columns, Zero Punctuation, Escape To The Movies and Extra Credits, are nothing more then slide-shows based on Google search images and the occasional minimalistic art. And it actually helps the viewer pay attention to what's otherwise some guy talking about video games (or in Yahtzee's case, reviewing them).
    • Moviebob's Game Overthinker series does the same thing as well.

Web Animation

Western Animation
  • South Park started off using paper cutout style animation similar to that used in Monty Python's Flying Circus in the two original shorts and the pilot episode. Since then, it's been all computer based but it still kept the same art and animation style, which has made producing the shots less of a hassle.
  • Home Movies, though it makes sense since it's a dialogue-driven series.
  • This is pretty much the signature style of all UPA cartoons, mainly as an alternative to replicating cinematic realism in animation. The fact that the Limited Animation style pioneered by them was horrendously abused didn't exactly help.
  • Word of God suggests that the character designs for Phineas and Ferb are simple on purpose to make kids be able to draw them, too.
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