Created By: LavonPapillon1 on August 2, 2017 Last Edited By: LavonPapillon1 on August 19, 2017
Nuked

Addiction Replacement

An addict trades their addiction with an equally - if not more - destructive addiction.

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This character is an alcoholic or other addict. They try to get on the wagon, but the wagon hits a pothole and they fall right back into their disgusting habits.

In many ways when one becomes addicted to a drug, they end up developing a natural resistance to it, needing more and more of it until they lose that high entirely and have to rely on even unhealthier alternatives.

In many circumstances, those who suffer from this have either been introduced to their destructive habits and end up in a slippery slope, like starting on a gateway drug. In other circumstances, this just means they have a naturally addictive personality. The addiction does not even have to be another drug. It can be something as simple as an obnoxious enthusiasm for religion, gambling on blackjack, sex addiction or even the euphoria of murder.

Compare with Addiction Displacement, where the replaced addiction is significantly less harmful.

See also Descent into Addiction for a taste of what it does to a healthy person.

Examples

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    Films - Live-Action 
  • Hilariously parodied in The Onion Movie. Bryce Brand spends six month in drug rehab and takes to the "high on life" saying literally. He huffs flowers and his tea and behaves as though he is high when experiencing life "little pleasures" (watching the sunset, walking along the beach, etc.). It gets so bad - magazines referring to it as a "Nightmarish addiction to life" - that his agent has him hooked back onto regular drugs with public support.

    Western Animation 
  • In the Family Guy episode "Peter's Two Dads", Peter decides to give up drinking after he inadvertently kills his father, only to start doing crack shortly after. Brian points out how much of a poor substitute it is.
  • * In Hey Arnold!, one episode deals with Arnold trying to help Chocolate Boy quit eating chocolate. By the end he succeeds, only for Chocolate Boy to immediately become addicted to radishes instead. While this seems to be a positive replacement, it soon becomes just as bad of a problem.

Community Feedback Replies: 3
  • August 12, 2017
    IniuriaTalis
    • In Hey Arnold, one episode deals with Arnold trying to help Chocolate Boy quit eating chocolate. By the end he succeeds, only for Chocolate Boy to immediately become addicted to radishes instead.

    I think this counts, because although they are healthier the episode ends with the radishes being treated as another concerning problem instead of a successful alternative.
  • August 12, 2017
    zarpaulus
    Addiction Displacement doesn't specify that it be less harmful. I think that aspect of the trope you're describing is covered.

    You might have something about developing resistance, though that could possibly be covered by Never Gets Drunk and Immune To Drugs.
  • August 14, 2017
    Folamh3
    ^ Seconded, I think this is already covered by Addiction Displacement.
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