Created By: troacctid on July 26, 2012 Last Edited By: troacctid on December 17, 2012
Troped

All Stories Are Real Somewhere

All works of fiction ever written are real in an alternate universe somewhere.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
From Trope Repair Shop thread.

Needs Examples. Rolling Updates.
The idea that all fictional universes really exist somewhere out there in the Multiverse: for any given ficton, there is an alternate universe in which it happened for real (giving a whole new meaning to the Fiction Identity Postulate).

This setting, by its nature, is used almost exclusively in Crossovers, although you'll sometimes see it restricted to Shows Within Shows instead.

A Massive Multiplayer Crossover tends to imply this, as does a Refugee from TV Land or Trapped in TV Land plot--usually they'll take it for granted without fully exploring the ramifications of supposedly-fictional universes coexisting with the real one. Two universes may be Mutually Fictional. Not to be confused with All Myths Are True, which applies to just one universe.


Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Fanfiction]]
  • The basic premise of the fanfic My Little Denarians: After it turns out that the Outside can be used to access fictional universes, Harry Dresden must travel to Equestria, to stop the Denarians from bringing Discord to Earth.
  • This is the premise behind the Back to the Future fan fiction Interactive BTTF Story #2. In a twist, Doc and Marty arrive in time periods where the movies are still in production, and interfering with said production in some way alters their own reality. It also implies King Kong, Jaws, and Ghostbusters are all in the same continuity.
  • The Star Trek fanfics "Visit To A Strange Planet" and "Visit to a Strange Planet Revisited" have the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise and the actors in the Star Trek: The Original Series show meeting each other.
  • Discussed in the collaborative fanfic Becoming Ponies - after Discord comes to Earth and a number of people are transformed into ponies (with a corresponding pony's mind stuck in their heads alongside their own) a pair of fanfic authors turned into Pinkie Pie and Fluttershy discuss the concept; namely, whether all worlds exist somewhere in the multiverse or whether they really bring worlds into being by writing. They find the second idea too horrible to accept.
  • The basis of Protectors of the Plot Continuum is that all works have their own reality, and writing fanfiction disrupts them, especially fanfics with Mary Sues. Thus, the eponymous organization sends agents disguised as background extras to set things right.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Film]]
  • In Last Action Hero, characters cross between movies and the real world. The villain's evil plan is to assemble an army of movie monsters and villains and bring them into reality to Take Over the World.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
  • Robert A. Heinlein used this trope in several of his works starting with The Number of the Beast, coining the term "The World As Myth" to describe it.
  • In Inkheart, every book is apparently its own world, and characters can read themselves in or out of them.
  • The very premise of The Neverending Story is that every single story, setting, or character a person in our world imagines becomes reality within Fantastica (which is a single world but it is effectively an endless patchworks of smaller "worlds"). When a "real" character enters Fantastica and discovers any story he tells comes true, he gains delayed Power of Creation, experiencing guilt over inadvertently creating monsters or making things too hard for heroes.
  • Jasper Fforde runs with this idea in the Thursday Next series, where Thursday is part of the literature police, policing the events in the literary continuum.
  • Discworld: In Pyramids, our narrator notes that in an infinite universe, everything that can be imagined exists somewhere.
  • Used in the Illuminatus! trilogy.
  • In Roger Zelazny's Book of Amber, basically anything imaginable can be found in Shadow, which is a multiverse of infinite parallel realities. At one point several characters travel to a place that's quite like Lewis Carrol's Wonderland, in which elements of the poem Jabberwocky also manifest.
  • In L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt's Compleat Enchanter, Harold Shea and his friends go hopping about fictional universes. The question of whether the authors created them, or they influence the authors, is brought up to go unanswered; at one point it's called meaningless.
  • In Stephen King's Dark Tower series, the characters actually get to meet and interact with the author, even if it is hinted that King is not the true source of their creation.
  • Poul Anderson wrote several stories based on this premise, notably A Midsummer Tempest, which is set in the world where all Shakespeare's plays actually happened; it explicitly sets out the premise in two sequences that feature cameos by people from other worlds/fictions.
  • Ray Bradbury's short story "The Exiles" opens with the three witches from Macbeth, and reveals that not only are fictional characters alive and well on Mars, but also their creators: The Bard, Dickens, etc. When the last copy of books referencing them are burned, they vanish.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
  • In Red Dwarf: Back to Earth, Kryten says it's "quantum mechanics 101" that all stories, dreams, and so on are real in parallel worlds, including the world where Red Dwarf is a TV show (and where the characters have just been in a squid-induced hallucination.)
  • Hinted at in Doctor Who: In the first Doctor story "The Chase", the Doctor takes seriously the possibility that they might have traveled into an alternate reality where Dracula was real (although that turned out to be a mistake). And in the second Doctor story "The Mind Robber", the Tardis and crew are forced to jump out of reality as we know it and find themselves in the Land of Fiction (although by some interpretations, they're inside a simulated universe created by a hyper-advanced computer).
  • This may to an extent be true in Sliders, particularly in the more far-fetched universes Quinn Mallory and his friends travel to.
  • Implied in Once Upon a Time; most of the European fairy tale characters came from a single Alternate Universe, and there are other worlds that include settings like Neverland and Wonderland.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Video Games]]
  • Boppin' features this as part of its story.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Webcomics]]
  • The Hero of Three Faces, a Massive Multiplayer Crossover webcomic by Paul Gadzikowski, uses the idea of alternate fictional universes to permit crossovers between works with incompatible continuities. A recurring plot point is that the "real" universes aren't always exactly like their fictional counterparts, which have been affected by budget restrictions, network broadcast standards, copyright issues, etc.: for instance, in the universe where Lois and Clark is real, Superman has met the Doctor several times, but in our universe the TV series shows him meeting H. G. Wells instead.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
  • Variant: in South Park's "Imaginationland" arc, there is an alternate dimension where all imaginary characters are real.
  • In the Series Finale of Spider-Man: The Animated Series, after solving the conundrum of Spider-Carnage, the central Spider-Man is told by Madame Webb that he must follow the Spider-Man who has no powers to his native universe to meet a certain person: Stan Lee. Of course, the big guy's reaction to a creation of his meeting him in the flesh sparks a whole new sense of awe in the man, as well as giving some sort of closure on Peter's own emotional turmoils.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Real Life]]
  • Cf. Modal Realism, the view promoted by philosopher David Lewis that all possible worlds are "real" in some sense.
[[/folder]]
Community Feedback Replies: 84
  • July 26, 2012
    animeg3282
    This is pinging the section of my brain devoted to 'Discworld'
  • July 26, 2012
    AgProv
    Jasper Fforde runs with this idea in the Tuesday Next series, where Tuesday is part of the literature police, policing the events in the literary continuum, where the events of all books ever written - and those yet to be - are universes true to themselves. The job of Tuesday and her colleagues is to police all this and prevent leakage.

    Also, the scene in Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson's Illuminatus, where seeress Mama Sutra reveals the events of Tolkein's Lord Of The Rings were not just made up by Tolkein - they really hsappened. (In this continuum, Sauron was a lloigr and the Orcs weere lesser denizens of the cthulu universe)

    And it tickles my Discworld nerves too!
  • July 26, 2012
    animeg3282
    Yes, but there MUST be an actual example!
  • July 26, 2012
    Rognik
    ^It's probably because there are too many to count. The simplest one that comes to mind is the personification of Death, who comes to everyone who dies, no matter their faith. He resembles the classic representation of death, a skeleton in a black cloak holding a scythe. The Hogsfather might also count, being a parody of Santa (or Father Christmas, as they might call him).
  • July 27, 2012
    Arivne
    Many of the examples in Massive Multiplayer Crossover are also this trope, or at least related to it.
  • July 27, 2012
    Koveras
    • The very premise of The Neverending Story is that every single story, setting, or character a person in our world imagines becomes reality within Phantasia (which is a single world but it is effectively an endless patchworks of smaller "worlds").
  • July 27, 2012
    troacctid
    ^^ But this isn't just about individual stories being true, it's about every story being true.
  • July 27, 2012
    zarpaulus
    I think the Discworld instance might be that time some wizards made the "Roundworld" aka our world and observed it for millions of years.
  • July 27, 2012
    MrRuano
    • In the Series Finale of Spider Man The Animated Series, after solving the conundrum of Spider-Carnage, the central Spider-Man is told by Madame Webb that he must follow the Spider-Man who has no powers to his native universe to meet a certain person: Stan Lee. Of course, the big guy's reaction to a creation of his meeting him in the flesh sparks a whole new sense of awe in the man, as well as giving some sort of closure on Peter's own emotional turmoils.
  • July 27, 2012
    NimmerStill
    Real Life: Cf. Modal Realism, the view promoted by philosopher David Lewis that all possible worlds are "real" in some sense. Though I don't believe he'd propose that crossover is possible.
  • July 27, 2012
    Rognik
    Tales Of The Five Hundred Kingdoms takes this trope and puts a name to it, called The Tradition. Every story ever told is seen as a repeating pattern, and people are forced into one of these paths. The plots of all the books are about fighting the traditional paths and making a new story, or winding up with Good winning in the end instead of evil.
  • July 27, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    This is extremely similar to All Myths Are True. I realize that means "all myths are true in this universe" and this would be "all myths are true in different universes", but I think the similarity is worth discussing.
  • July 28, 2012
    troacctid
    ^ Noted.

    I'm not sure if Tales Of The Five Hundred Kingdoms fits. Sounds like it's all happening in one world, which is something else.
  • July 28, 2012
    NimmerStill
    For the published version you should replace "I don't believe he'd" with "he probably wouldn't" in my Real Life post.

    • edit* Or that.
  • July 28, 2012
    Kossmeister
    According to Marvel Comics, the omniverse is the setting where all fictional multiverses exist, including those belonging to DC Comics, Marvel Comics, etc.
  • July 28, 2012
    nitrokitty
    Even if it is different from All Myths Are True (which is debatable), how do you propose to avoid Trope Decay into basically being the same thing?
  • July 28, 2012
    NimmerStill
    This can have contradictory myths both be true somewhere. That can't. Seems pretty clear to me.
  • July 29, 2012
    animeg3282
    I found it! In the Disc World novel Pyramids our narrator notes that in an infinite universe, everything that can be imagined exists somewhere.
  • July 30, 2012
    AgProv
    Which is also stated clearly - and inthose very words - in Shea and Wilson's Illuminatus! series. But then, Terry Pratchett has read Illuminatus and clearly references it in the Discworld books.
  • July 30, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    The basic premise of the fanfic My Little Denarians: After it turns out that the Outside can be used to access fictional universes, Harry Dresden must travel to Equestria, to stop the denarians from bringing Discord to Earth.
  • July 31, 2012
    robinjohnson
    • In Red Dwarf: Back to Earth, Kryten says it's "quantum mechanics 101" that all stories, dreams, and so on are real in parallel worlds, including the world where Red Dwarf is a TV show (and where the characters have just been in a squid-induced hallucination.)
  • July 31, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    ^ So is this a fictional riff on the concept of multiple universes or multiple dimensions from physics?
  • August 1, 2012
    Fighteer
    It's not about multiple dimensions per se, but the idea that authorship/imagination inherently creates alternate universes/dimensions in which fictional inventions become real. The World as Myth is about creativity being a literally creative force.

    Heinlein took it a bit further in that he also proposed that all worlds are Mutually Fictional; that is, that every universe -- including our own -- is an invention of someone in another universe. If you apply this to the Neverending Story example, it would be as if someone in that world were writing Bastian's story at the same time that Bastian is writing theirs.
  • August 1, 2012
    MrRuano
    Perhaps there's a better name that won't make this so confusing? The title as it is kind of implies the idea of All Myths Are True. Maybe something like Fiction Is Reality...
  • August 1, 2012
    NimmerStill
    ^Agreed about the name.

    As for the creation, that's one variant. With Modal Realism, it doesn't matter if someone's thought of it or not; all possible histories are actualized somewhere. Some works probably treat it like that too, right?
  • August 1, 2012
    Avurai
    Gunnerkrigg Court seems like a contender for this. It has psychopomps, elves, fairies, ghosts, psychics, fire elementals, valkyries, trickster gods from France and America, among others. It stands to reason that nearly all mythical creatures exist in this universe.

    EDIT: Okay, that was me jumping to conclusions, which was entirely my own error. But yes. You must change the title.
  • August 1, 2012
    robinjohnson
  • August 1, 2012
    animeg3282
    I like that name. we can make a note about the Trope Namer
  • August 2, 2012
    troacctid
  • August 2, 2012
    NimmerStill
    What Trope Namer? You mean the former Trope Namer?
  • August 3, 2012
    animeg3282
    Yes, although the name is still 'the world as myth' up top
  • August 3, 2012
    nitrokitty
    I like the new name. It will help avoid confusion with All Myths Are True.
  • August 3, 2012
    troacctid
    Title swapped since it seems to be a popular option.
  • August 3, 2012
    LOAD
    Bump
  • August 3, 2012
    NESBoy
    This is the premise behind the Back To The Future fan fiction, Interactive BTTF Story #2. In a twist, Doc and Marty arrive in time periods where the movies are still in production, and interferring with said production in some way alters their own reality. It also implies King Kong, Jaws, and Ghostbusters are all in the same continuity.
  • August 3, 2012
    Lumpenprole
    Hinted at in Doctor Who: in the first Doctor story "The Chase", the Doctor takes seriously the possibility that they might have traveled into an alternate reality where Dracula was real (although that turned out to be a mistake). And in the second Doctor story "The Mind Robber", the Tardis and crew are forced to jump out of reality as we know it and find themselves in the Land of Fiction (although by some interpretations, they're inside a simulated universe created by a hyper-advanced computer).
  • August 5, 2012
    Arivne
    Fan Fiction
    • The Star Trek fanfics "Visit to a Strange Planet" and "Visit to a Strange Planet Revisited" have the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise and the actors in the Star Trek The Original Series show meeting each other.
  • August 5, 2012
    nitrokitty
    This may overlap in places with the Theory Of Narrative Causality.
  • August 5, 2012
    DalekKanNoladti
    Isn't this a straight-up repeat of the Literary Agent Hypothesis?
  • August 5, 2012
    captainsandwich
    Any relation to All Myths Are True?
  • August 5, 2012
    troacctid
    All Myths Are True happens in one setting where this spans multiple universes. (So it's a Crossover Trope, basically.) Also, All Myths Are True deals with general legend and folklore and such, whereas this is dealing with specific individual fictons.

    Literary Agent Hypothesis is the idea that the fictional story is actually a dramatization of the events as they "actually" happened. So for example the "real" Godzilla isn't a guy in a costume, that's just how they represent it onscreen. I don't think it's related to this trope at all.
  • August 5, 2012
    randomsurfer
    Would this count? May need a better description.
    • In the DC Multiverse stories which happen on Earth-2 are just comic books on Earth-1, but it really exists as a Parallel Earth and those stories really did happen there. Earth Prime is our Earth/universe, where both Earth-1 and Earth-2 stories are fictional - except (a) both Earth-1 and Earth-2 (and all other Earths) really do exist as parallel Earths, and (b) it turns out that there really was a Krypton here, which really did explode, and Clark Kent really did get sent to Earth as a baby (as did an earler hero, who relocated to Earth-1 when he decided Earth Prime wasn't ready for supers). Comic book writers are somehow psychicly connected to the parallel Earth and can accuratly write what happens there, but they think they're just making it up
  • August 6, 2012
    troacctid
    I have no idea.
  • August 6, 2012
    randomsurfer
    It might be my description-fu is weak. Somebody else wanna take a crack at it?
  • August 7, 2012
    electronshock
    In Roger Zelazny's Book Of Amber, basically anything imaginable can be found in Shadow, which is a multiverse of infinite parallel realities. At one point several characters travel to a place that's quite like Lewis Carrol's Wonderland, in which elements of the poem Jabberwocky also manifest.
  • August 7, 2012
    CrankyStorming
    The Dresden Codak story Phantoms of a Lost Muse deals with an author who, for all his efforts, cannot create a story without it coming true. This is exploited by the many people who go to him to suggest ideas that they want to come true.
  • August 7, 2012
    troacctid
    ^ I think that's Rewriting Reality.
  • August 7, 2012
    CrankyStorming
    It is an example of this, since reference is made to events being real in the past as well as the present.
  • August 7, 2012
    MrRuano
    • Justice League also presented a variation in this in Legends. When the Flash, Martian Manhunter, Green Lantern and Hawkgirl find out they've ended up in an alternate universe, John comments that the Justice Guild of this new Earth were heroes of old comic books he read when he was a kid. J'onn then explains this similarity as a subconscious link between the comic book writers and this universe (As is described by randomsurfer).
      • The real truth behind all this involves a Reality Warper changing the world so that it becomes like an idyllic comic book.
  • August 12, 2012
    NESBoy
    Hey, whoever put MrRuano's Justice League example into the main write-up, you forgot to delete the "(As is described by randomsurfer)" bit.

    Speaking of whom, his example still needs to be added.

    Oh, and...
    • Boppin features this as part of its story.

    Also, I found two web links that discuss this trope as it applies to the DCU: this one from "Silver Age Comics" by Pat Curley, and this one (which also discusses the use of comic covers for The Flash as a storytelling device in Catch Me If You Can) from "Dial B for Blog" by Kirk "Robby Reed" Kimball.
  • August 12, 2012
    troacctid
    *looking over the links* Yeah it looks like the DCU isn't an example of this, as it explicitly covers only a very small and finite subset of fiction.
  • August 12, 2012
    Goldfritha
    • In L Sprague De Camp and Fletcher Pratt's Compleat Enchanter, Harold Shea and his friends go hopping about fictional universes. The question of whether the authors created them, or they influence the authors, is brought up to go unanswered; at one point it's called meaningless.
  • November 30, 2012
    troacctid
    I've neglected this for a while. But here's a bump, and a launch should be imminent--and a reminder that this will displace The World As Myth. Any more examples or anything before sending this off to the main wiki?
  • November 30, 2012
    JonnyB
    This is the unspoken premise of Shrek; in Shrek's world, all of our fairy tales are real.
  • November 30, 2012
    troacctid
    ^ That's more a case of All Myths Are True.
  • November 30, 2012
    Helmholtz
    This is very prominent in Stephen Kings's Dark Tower. Bullet point added, albeit poorly.
  • November 30, 2012
    acrobox
    In an extreme (yet limited) way Chalk Zone, that everything ever written and erased off of a chalkboard instantly reappears and comes to life in the zone. This includes not only all kinds of art, doodles, and characters but also letters, numbers, words, and scribbles.
  • November 30, 2012
    Tolamak3
    Would the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen work? It's mainly British Literature, but it seems close enough.
  • November 30, 2012
    troacctid
    The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen is Literary Agent Hypothesis, isn't it? The characters aren't from alternate fictional universes; their books were written as biographies. Right?
  • December 2, 2012
    zarpaulus
    • In Once Upon A Time most of the European fairy tale characters came from a single Alternate Universe, and there are other worlds where characters like Neverland and Wonderland.
  • December 2, 2012
    Surenity
    • This may to an extent be true in Sliders, particularly in the more far-fetched universes Quinn Mallory and his friends travel to.
  • December 3, 2012
    Mozgwsloiku
    Discussed in the collaborative fanfic Becoming Ponies - after Discord comes to Earth and a number of people are transformed into ponies (with a corresponding pony's mind stuck in their heads alongside their own) a pair of fanfic authors turned into Pinkie Pie and Fluttershy discuss the concept; namely, whether all worlds exist somewhere in the multiverse or whether they really bring worlds into being by writing. They find the second idea to horrible to accept.
  • December 3, 2012
    dvorak
    The basis of Protectors Of The Plot Continuum is that all works have their own reality, and writing fanfiction disrupts them, especially fanfics with Mary Sues. Thus, the titular organization sends agents disguised as background extras to set things right.
  • December 3, 2012
    PaulA
    • Poul Anderson wrote several stories based on this premise, notably A Midsummer Tempest, which is set in the world where all Shakespeare's plays actually happened; it explicitly sets out the premise in two sequences that feature cameos by people from other worlds/fictions.
  • December 3, 2012
    PaulA
    troacctid: League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is set in a world where all those fictions are true; there are several definite indications over the course of the series that it's not our world.
  • December 3, 2012
    troacctid
    But they're all from the same universe, and they're not fictional within that universe? So that wouldn't count for this.
  • December 3, 2012
    dvorak
    Real Life
    • If the Many Worlds Theory, which states that there are an infinite number of dimensions, is true, this means that there's dimensions that mimmic all works of fiction perfectly completely by accident.
  • December 4, 2012
    PaulA
    Oh, I see. Yes, League is set in a single universe that combines all the fictions, not a multiverse.
  • December 4, 2012
    PaulA
    If fanfiction examples are allowed:

    • The Hero of Three Faces, a Massive Multiplayer Crossover webcomic by Paul Gadzikowski, uses the idea of alternate fictional universes to permit crossovers between works with incompatible continuities. A recurring plot point is that the "real" universes aren't always exactly like their fictional counterparts, which have been affected by budget restrictions, network broadcast standards, copyright issues, etc.: for instance, in the universe where Lois And Clark is real, Superman has met the Doctor several times, but in our universe the TV series shows him meeting HG Wells instead.
  • December 4, 2012
    Lomerell
    The Exiles, a short story by Ray Bradbury, opens with three witches from Shakespeare, and reveals that not only are fictional characters alive and well on Mars, but also their creators: The Bard, Dickens, etc. When the last copy of books referencing them are burned, they vanish.
  • December 4, 2012
    Lomerell
    Sub-bullet for The Neverending Story:

    • When a "real" character enters Fantastica and discovers any story he tells comes true, he gains delayed Power of Creation, experiencing guilt over inadvertently creating monsters or making things too hard for heroes.

    Noteworthy in that it relates directly to this trope (is caused by it).

    Also note: "Phantasia" is the film name for the fantasy world (which unfortunately doesn't include this trope or much else from the novel). The version in print is "Fantastica" so references under Literature should read thusly.
  • December 5, 2012
    troacctid
    ^ Please review How To Write An Example. Examples don't get sub-bullets, period.

    I'll edit the entry.
  • December 5, 2012
    mythbuster
  • December 5, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
  • December 5, 2012
    dvorak
  • December 6, 2012
    Arivne
    ^^^ The OP examples already include Robert Heinlein's "The World As Myth" and The Number Of The Beast.
  • December 6, 2012
    Lomerell
    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Administrivia/ExampleIndentationInTropeLists?from=Main.ExampleIndentationInTropeLists lists 2-bullet (and even rarely 3-bullet) styles.

    Do what you want with the entry, but the reason I said sub-bullet is that's a secondary example trope which owes its existence to the parent example. It's not a conversational threaded "reply" to the first bullet.

    • Alice and Bob:
      • In episode 2, this trope occurs when...

    • Neverending Story
  • December 6, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    ^ Those are incomplete examples. It would be:

    • Alice and Bob:
      • In episode 2, this trope occurs when...
      • In episode 21, this trope occurs again when...

    Or...

    • The Neverending Story
      • In Part 1, blahbittyblahblah
      • Part 2, added implications (Playing With A Trope ?) Discussed, Exploited?


    That style of sub-bullet is indeed a kind of "threaded reply". It just looks closer to correct than outright natter. "[A] secondary example trope which owes its existence to the parent example" is not a valid reason to have a sub-bullet.
  • December 9, 2012
    Lomerell
    Would the worlds-of-movies from Last Action Hero qualify? They are a version of Trapped In TV Land.
  • December 9, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    We should make it clear how this is different from All Myths Are True. Then, it probably is launch-ready.
  • December 9, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    That has been suggested several times. The description says "Not to be confused with All Myths Are True, which applies to just one universe." Do you think there is remaining ambiguity that should be clarified?
  • December 9, 2012
    troacctid
    I'll drop an entry on the List Of Subtle Trope Distinctions come launch. I think they're pretty solidly distinct, though.
  • December 17, 2012
    randomsurfer
    For a short while at DC Comics there was the concept of "Hypertime," which basically said that all stories published by DC Comics are canon somewhere in the multiverse. Batman never used a gun? Canon. Batman Grabs A Gun? Canon. Batman killing people left and right with guns? Also canon.
  • December 17, 2012
    elwoz
    Another setting trope that commonly makes use of this is Inn Between The Worlds.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=k9jvq1ektdmewvfwbmur0adn&trope=AllStoriesAreRealSomewhere