Created By: DarkSasami on July 27, 2010 Last Edited By: DarkSasami on January 13, 2012

Hollywood Hollywood

Tinseltown is all star-studded glitz, all the time.

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Do We Have This? Didn't we used to have this?

That screwy, ballyhooey Hollywood!

We have Hollywood California, but there's only one tiny line in the description of "Los Angeles" that touches on Hollywood proper, in the old sense. Stars, glitz, glamor, magic, romance, fame, and fortune! Searchlights, red carpets, gala premieres, exclusive clubs, limousines and long cigarette holders! The Brown Derby, Grauman's Chinese Theatre, the Sunset Strip, the Walk of Fame at Hollywood and Vine! Talent scouts discovering the latest superstar serving coffee at the local diner! Exclamation points on everything!

Almost a Forgotten Trope these days, since everything (including Hollywood itself) is Darker and Edgier now, though it's even more forgotten that Hollywood Hollywood was always a little bit tongue-in-cheek, and the flimsy scaffolding holding up the glitzy facades showed more than modern audiences give credit for.

I went through all of Hollywood Style, but I really can't find anything that talks about this at all, except its opposite: Horrible Hollywood.

Looking for more straight examples!

  • In The Dukes Of Hazzard Reunion Show "Hazzard in Hollywood!" Daisy comes across a film set where they hire her on the spot to do a complicated stunt. Done in one take, without any rehearsal.
  • Singin' in the Rain - especially the Framing device of a film opening, before delving into the nuts and bolts of movie making (which was still simplified from reality).
  • I Love Lucy had An Arc with a long road trip to Hollywood, in which the characters mixed and mingled with (and occasionally stalked) Hollywood stars, were dazzled by Hollywood fashions, and look for their big breaks into the biz.
  • The song "Hooray for Hollywood", from 1937's Hollywood Hotel, is perhaps the theme song for this trope, conveying both the thrill and allure of fame and fortune, and the superficiality and silliness of it all.
  • The Academy Awards and other award pageants attempt to preserve the Hollywood Hollywood atmosphere, with an interesting mix of results.
  • In Molly Moon, the author seems to think that all stars just randomly stroll around Hollywood all the time.
  • Holy Wood in the Discworld novel Moving Pictures is this...right up until the Eldritch Abomination shows up.

Community Feedback Replies: 22
  • June 14, 2010
    PaulA
    We've got Hollywood California, and Los Angeles, although neither is quite the thing you're talking about.
  • June 14, 2010
    DarkSasami
    Right, I checked both of those out, and they're definitely Not It.
  • June 14, 2010
    randomsurfer
    In The Dukes Of Hazzard Reunion Show "Hazzard in Hollywood!" Daisy comes across a film set where they hire her on the spot to do a complicated stunt. Done in one take, without any rehearsal.
  • June 15, 2010
    DaibhidC
    Holy Wood in the Discworld novel Moving Pictures is this. Well, you know, until the Eldritch Abomination shows up...
  • March 7, 2011
    arromdee
    The Dukes of Hazzard example is You Fail Film School Forever.
  • March 7, 2011
    NoirGrimoir
    Should just call this Old Hollywood or Hollywood Classic or something.
  • March 7, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Singing In The Rain - especially the Framing device of a film opening, before delving into the nuts and bolts of movie making (which was still simplified from reality).
  • March 7, 2011
    DarkSasami
    It's not just old or classic Hollywood, though. It's Hollywood's classic portrayal of Hollywood. So, along the same lines of Hollywood Heart Attack, Hollywood California, and Hollywood New England, this is logically Hollywood Hollywood.

    And I looked in You Fail Film School Forever, and I don't see any Dukes, or any removal of Dukes in the history...?
  • March 7, 2011
    randomsurfer
    ^arromdee isn't saying it's already on YFFSF, he's saying it's an example of YFFSF rather than of this.
  • March 8, 2011
    DarkSasami
    Heh, you're right, I saw an "on" that wasn't there.
  • August 2, 2011
    PaulA
  • August 2, 2011
    DarkSasami
    Hmm, not quite. Company Town seems to be a more serious take on Hollywood, or even a neutral take. The idea I'm getting at here is when Hollywood is depicted as being just as glamorous in person as the films it produced.

    Or at least the dream in the hearts and minds of characters that it is, which can be subverted with Horrible Hollywood later when it turns out that Celebrity Is Overrated.
  • August 2, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    Newsreels showing stars getting immortalized in cement at Grauman's, occasionally Hilarity Ensues, especially when the star is a comedian.

    Also consider Nickelodeon and Chaplin for views of silent era films, with innocuous people and things just before they're "discovered". Sunset Boulevard for the deluded aging star and her star treatment.
  • August 22, 2011
    EdnaWalker
    Bump?
  • August 23, 2011
    jaytee
    Why can't you just add to Hollywood California?
  • August 30, 2011
    DarkSasami
    Because it's a trope?
  • January 6, 2012
    Noaqiyeum
    Kick.
  • January 6, 2012
    sliz225
    In Molly Moon, the author seems to think that all stars just randomly stroll around Hollywood all the time.
  • January 6, 2012
    JonnyB
    A series of episodes of I Love Lucy has Lucy and Ricky going to Hollywood, and it's entirely this trope. Somewhat justified as Ricky is hobnobbing with the stars trying to get into a feature film, but it's largely seen through Lucy's eyes as a glamorous star-studded wonderland.
  • January 12, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    This trope comes up in an episode of the 70s Ellery Queen TV series ("The Adventure of the Sinister Scenario"). The Queens, father and son, are in Hollywood observing the film adaptation of one of Ellery's books; the endearingly grumpy father states his desire to go see the stars' homes and drops a name (Hedy Lamarr, if memory serves). There's also a degree of disillusionment of the Horrible Hollywood variety, since of course there's real murder on the set and the actual nuts and bolts of production are a bit of a comedown.
  • January 13, 2012
    Cider
    I suppose the repetitive name goes with the rest of our Hollywood Tropes but is anyone opposed to something more indicative. Hollywood Is Glamorous, Gilded Hollywood?
  • January 13, 2012
    69BookWorM69
    No, not if Hollywood Hollywood is kept as a redirect.
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