Created By: Gwardyn on February 14, 2012 Last Edited By: Gwardyn on February 26, 2012

Baritone Rocker

A vocalist in a rock genre singing with a relatively low voice

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Up for Grabs, perhaps Needs a Better Title? Rock and heavy metal listeners have a thing for high-pitched male vocals - around 90% of singers in the genre have (or pretend to have, using strong, reinforced falsetto) tenor voices, while less than a third of the male population operate in that register.

Baritone Rocker isn't a part of this majority, deciding not to pretend to be someone he's not (or perhaps not being skilled enough to pull it off) - high notes are heard occasionally, and certainly aren't the thing that the singer's style is known for.

NOTE:
  • The trope isn't exclusive to baritone singers - the bass ones (although they seem to be nonexistent) also qualify, and there may also be some examples of tenor singers who fit to this trope.
  • Not every singer with a natural baritone register qualifies for the trope - for example Axl Rose and Rob Halford are disqualified because their styles rely on falsetto.
  • Growling vocalists shouldn't qualify, because in the genre it's more or less a standard, while this trope is meant to contain exceptions.

Examples

  • Jimi Hendrix
  • Jim Morrison
  • Eddie Turner, American bluesman fronting his solo act
  • Omar Kent Dykes - singer of the bluesrock band Omar & The Howlers
  • Glenn Danzig, founding member of The Misfits and the man behind the heavy metal act Danzig
  • ZZ Top frontman Billy Gibbons
  • James Hetfield of Metallica
  • Ville Valo of HIM
Community Feedback Replies: 16
  • February 15, 2012
    Gwardyn
    Bump?
  • February 16, 2012
    Gwardyn
    Ehh...
  • February 17, 2012
    peccantis
    • Ville Valo of HIM
  • February 18, 2012
    Gwardyn
    Bump
  • February 18, 2012
    Skinfakse
    Mikael Ã…kerfeldt of Opeth, when he's not growling or singing falsetto.
  • February 22, 2012
    Gwardyn
    Wiki Magic, Y U NO WORK?
  • February 22, 2012
    Shnakepup
    • Lead singer Paul Banks from the band Music/Interpol has a nasally baritone.
  • February 22, 2012
    TrustBen
  • February 22, 2012
    MetaFour
    • Jason Martin of Starflyer 59 sang falsetto on his early albums, but has since settled in a more natural range. Years of smoking also lowered his voice.
  • February 23, 2012
    Gwardyn
    I also wondered, is the article well-written, or does the wording need some correction? And are there any objections about this being tropable?

    If there's nothing, I would lean forwards launching it in the next week.
  • February 23, 2012
    Gwardyn
    To elaborate on this being tropable, we do have a trope for Harsh Vocals, which carries some similarity to this one. But I may be wrong.
  • February 23, 2012
    Sackett
    Why is this specific to rock?

    Almost all musical style vocals that I know of prefer tenors and sopranos.

    Additionally it seems a strange way to approach the trope. It seems to me the trope is the favoring of tenors and so should be written about tenors, rather then baritones.

    I mean... what about a bass? Wouldn't he also count as an aversion of the tenor lead singer?

    So I'd suggest instead writing a trope: Lead Singers Are Tenors
  • February 23, 2012
    Gwardyn
    And then write down only aversions, listing them by genre?

    Does someone else think it would be a good idea?
  • February 24, 2012
    benjamminsam
    Brad Roberts of the Crash Test Dummies ('Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm')
  • February 26, 2012
    Sackett
    ^^ Yeah, that's the common method to handle tropes that are constantly in use.

    Write the trope about how Tenors are favored lead singers, and then list aversions.
  • February 26, 2012
    Sackett
    Might want to check out Tenor Boy as a related trope
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