Same Creator Expy
When a creator recycles characterization from an old work into a new work
Needs Examples Motion To Discard

(permanent link) added: 2012-11-09 23:12:28 sponsor: WaxingName (last reply: 2012-11-10 23:15:53)

Add Tag:

See this thread for more info

Creators have the tendency to borrow characters from each other all the time. The reasons range from wanting to capitalize on the success of each other, or because one creator liked another creator's character. But then there's the tendency for creators to borrow characterizations from themselves.

For many creators, both individuals and entire teams, patterns can be noticeable between works by the same creator. There are many reasons for this. First, if a creator noticed that a certain type of character worked once, they could incorporate that same characterization under a different name in hopes that it will work again. Second, even though the creator is trying to make a new work, they may subconsciously incorporate an old characterization into the new work like it's a developed habit.

Creators are generally given much less criticism for "stealing" their own characters than for stealing another creator's characters, because they're seen as having the right to recycle characters that were theirs in the first place.

Sister Trope to Reused Character Design and Only Six Faces (this trope's visual conterpart) and Author Catchphrase.

Examples

Literature
  • Rob Grant's novel Colony is about an ineffectual everyman who dies on board a spaceship, then is revived in a robot body centuries later and forced to better himself as a leader. This is a slightly more sympathetic version of Arnold Rimmer from Red Dwarf, which Grant previously co-wrote with Doug Naylor.
  • Lord Rowcester in P. G. Wodehouse's Ring For Jeeves is almost identical to Bertie Wooster, Jeeves's master in all the other Jeeves stories. The only reason it isn't Bertie Wooster, and Jeeves is on loan to Lord Rowcester, is that Wodehouse wanted the main character to get married at the end, and didn't want to marry off Bertie.

Video Games
  • BioWare is noted to have been doing this throughout their catalog to the point that we have a list of archetypes commonly found in their works.

Western Animation
replies: 10

TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy