Created By: robybang on October 2, 2011

Q And Assassinate

Ask if there are any questions, then kill anyone who actually asks.

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Trope
So you are the leader of The Omniscient Council of Vagueness and you have just described your plot to rob the world's supply of Mineral MacGuffin as part of your evil plan for world domination. As a brilliant criminal mastermind or Corrupt Corporate Executive, you feel you stated your plan briefly but eloquently. But to be safe, you ask if anyone in the council has any questions, confident that you...

Oh, turns out someone does have a question or ethical concern. So what do you do? Shoot them.

After a brief pause, turn to the rest of the council members and ask "Any ''other'' questions?"

Similar to Shoot the Messenger and You Have Outlived Your Usefulness, Q And Assassinate is used by Big Bads to show how evil and dangerous they are and their low tolerance for anyone that challenges their authority, even high ranking officials in their organization. In works for younger audiences, those that dare to ask a question are removed via a trap door underneath their chair.


Examples:

Western Animation
  • In Frosty Returns, one of the people on Mr. Twitchell's board of trustees questioned the environmental impact of his snow removal spray. She gets fired and sent out a trap door.

Community Feedback Replies: 8
  • November 19, 2012
    Eaglelander
    How did we miss this one? It's one of the running gags of over-the-top-villainy! Needs more examples, but it could work!
  • November 19, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    Strangely, Truth In Television. It largely depends upon what kind of question you ask, and the punishment for asking usually isn't death (unless you live in a fascist country) but rather discovering that certain questions will not be answered. For instance, attending a feminist workshop and asking "but what do we do if men are abused/raped" will earn a quick subject change if not outright denial of the possibility.
  • November 19, 2012
    captainpat
    See Example As A Thesis. You need to rewrite the description so it's not using a hypothetical situation to explain your trope.

  • November 20, 2012
    Chabal2

  • November 21, 2012
    Arivne
    This doesn't exactly fit the description, but it's close.

    Film
    • Sir August de Wynter does something like this in The Avengers 1998. At a gathering of his minions he asks if any of them want to resign. When two of them do, he kills them.
  • November 21, 2012
    Waterlily
    "Strangely, Truth In Television. It largely depends upon what kind of question you ask, and the punishment for asking usually isn't death (unless you live in a fascist country) but rather discovering that certain questions will not be answered. For instance, attending a feminist workshop and asking "but what do we do if men are abused/raped" will earn a quick subject change if not outright denial of the possibility."

    That doesn't sound like the same thing at all. The difference between shooting somebody if they ask a question and simply refusing to answer them is HUGE.

  • November 21, 2012
    shimaspawn
    I think the title needs some work. Question And Assassinate would work better as the concept is always called Q & A or Question and Answer but never Q & Answer.
  • November 21, 2012
    nitrokitty
    I think bulmabriefs144 and Waterlily have just demonstrated that this needs a No Real Life Examples tag.
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