Created By: blackfedora81 on January 14, 2013 Last Edited By: troacctid on September 6, 2015

In Universe Pronunciation Guide

Bob mispronounces a name given textually, and when he is corrected, so is the audience.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
You're reading a book or watching a TV show or movie where an unusual name, like Bonzo come up in print. When you read it to yourself you hear Bohn-Zoe. Bob reads the same thing and says it the same way. Later, Joe comes along and corrects Bob by pronouncing it Bone-Zoe. This means you've been mispronouncing it all along. Don't feel too bad, though. Bob made the same mistake!

Someone or something has more than one pronunciation, one of them being extremely common. Bob, and the audience see it in written form and mispronounce it in the common way. Joe pronounces it another way, which turns out to be the right way for this particular reading, thus correcting Bob AND the reader/viewer simultaneously.

The common pronunciation can be either right or wrong in and of itself, and the correct pronunciation is not made for the purposes of seeming posh. The common pronunciation happens not to be correct in-universe, and is an easy mistake to make.

This is like a one-shot text-based The Watson, except that this refers to a situation, rather than a character.

Subversion of No Pronunciation Guide, and an example of playing against audience expectations. See Also, Spell My Name with an "S", and Its Pronounced Tro Pay


Examples

Literature
  • Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game
    • In the original book Ender receives transfer orders to Bonzo's army, and reads his orders aloud. Petra corrects Ender and the reader with the right pronunciation.
    • Ender's Shadow. After several chapters, Sister Carlotta has to correct Graff about the proper pronunciation of Achilles' name. It's not pronounced like the name of the Greek hero (which is an otherwise correct pronunciation), but is instead pronounced the French way: Ah-Sheel. Card corrects the reader rather late!
  • In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Hermione explains to the foreigner Viktor Krum that her name is pronounced "Her-my-oh-nee", functioning as both a character moment for the two of them and clearing up for the audience how "Hermione" is pronounced.
  • In Hogfather, Jonathan Teatime corrects people on the pronunciation of his last name ("Teh-ah-time-eh") on his first appearance (and frequently throughout the book, as mispronunciation of it seems to be his only Berserk Button).
  • In the Dresden Files book White Night, Harry notes the pronunciation of a character's name for the reader's benefit.
    She pronounced her name with the Old World emphasis: Ah-nah.
  • In Animorphs, the heroes discover that one Mr. DeGroot is looking for Tobias. When Tobias speaks to DeGroot's secretary, he asks for Mr. DeGroot (apparently pronounced as spelled) and is told that it is pronounced as "de-groat".

Live-Action TV
  • In Game of Thrones, Danaerys visits the city state of Qarth, which she pronounces as "Quarth," and sort of acts like she owns the place. She is corrected by a snooty member of its leadership that the place's name is pronounced "Karth." This correction is also for the benefit of the audience, since the original book series has No Pronunciation Guide.
  • A reverse example shows up early on in Stargate SG-1: O'Neill very pointedly spells "Teal'c" aloud when facilitating Teal'c's entrance interview with Stargate Command, presumably because the person taking notes would spell it phonetically otherwise, but really because the audience would have no reason to suspect that a name pronounced "Teelk" would have an apostrophe in it anywhere.

Video Games
  • Inverted in the The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion expansion pack, Shivering Isles, where you can find a journal written by an adventurer. He writes about the 'Tsaesci', a race of snake people from Akavir, but because he's only heard the word spoken, he spells it 'Sayessie' (providing a pronunciation guide for the audience) until a scholar gets a look at the journal and insists on him writing the correct spelling.

Community Feedback Replies: 86
  • January 14, 2013
    troacctid
    I think this is Its Pronounced Tro Pay
  • January 14, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    @troaoctid I thought so too at first, but then, reading the OP's description, I think what this YKTTW is for is when you have examples of a certain word or name in a work, but the people viewing/reading said work are unsure of its pronunciation, and therefore, you have different people pronouncing it one way, and others pronouncing it another... one example I can think of is:

    Live Action TV
    • The Muppet Show: The pink cow-like creatures known as the Snowths (who provide backup for Mahna Mahna). Since the creatures' names are never made audible, fans have been confused as to the correct pronunciaiton; some pronounce it the way it is spell, "Snow-th", however, because the creatures' names are supposed to be derived from the words "Snout" and "mouth" (and they are cow-like), some fans pronounce it as, "Sn-OW-th".
  • January 14, 2013
    Ryusui
    Don't we already have No Pronunciation Guide?
  • January 14, 2013
    TheHandle
    ^Except the pronunciation guide is provided here.

    And Ah-sheel is the French pronounciation for Achilles.
  • January 14, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • On Bones Brennan, being the obsessive-compulsive perfectionist that she is, will stop conversations to correct people's pronunciations of non-usual words. In one episode dealing with an Amish teen who died while on Rumspringa, she corrects others who mispronounce Rumspringa several times. (I've heard that she in fact mispronounces it but I don't have the expertise to aver that myself.)
    • In one episode of Unhappily Ever After the proper pronunciation of forte came up several times as a Running Gag/Plot Point. [[note]] (Pronounced "for-tay" it's Italian for "loudness" and pronounced "fort" it's French for "strength." But most people in the US pronounce it Italian style even when they mean the French word.)[[/note]]
  • January 15, 2013
    ZombieAladdin
    Something I want to point out: At least in California, "bone," "bahn," and "bon" each have different vowel sounds. So I suppose in a way, the laconic description is self-demonstrating.
  • January 15, 2013
    Stratadrake
    So it's basically the verbal version of You Make Me Sic?
  • January 15, 2013
    Tuckerscreator
    The laconic for It Is Pronounced Tro PAY says "Insisting on a particular pronunciation." That already seems to cover this.
  • January 15, 2013
    MetaFour
    Laconics are frequently oversimplified or just wrong.

    There seem to be two separate trope ideas: (1) People using a non-standard (usually foreign-sounding) pronunciation in an attempt to make an otherwise ordinary or embarrassing name sound fancy or special. This trope better fits Its Pronounced Tro PAY. (2) Expositing the proper pronunciation of an unfamiliar word by having one character correct another character. This better fits this ykttw.
  • January 16, 2013
    troacctid
    Which is The Watson for pronunciation, which could be tropable, but the Trope Namer Syndrome is seriously a problem here.
  • January 16, 2013
    Stratadrake
    @Meta: Fixed that laconic.
  • January 17, 2013
    gallium
  • January 17, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Close, but no see-gar.
  • January 17, 2013
    Xtifr
    I bet the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band would disagree about how it's pronounced! :)

    (Needs a better name. Heck, I'm a fan of the series, and had no memory of any such character.)
  • January 17, 2013
    Stratadrake
    There could be a thing in which the mispronuniciation is noted by the character who knows the correct version (perhaps as a flavor of Berserk Button), which is quite distinct from It Is Pronounced Tro PAY. For example, I live in Oregon (pronounced "Oreegun") and one of the mispronunciations is "auragone".

    However we'd need to restrict it to in-universe examples, like the one episode of Babylon 5 where the ISN news anchor pronounces Susan's last name as "I've-a-Nova" (Ivanova).
  • January 17, 2013
    dvorak
    This is Its Pronounced Tro Pay applied to a characters name. If we still allowed Snow Clones, I'd have suggested "it's Pronounced Bone So." We also discourage naming tropes after characters (In this case, Ender's CO).
  • January 17, 2013
    Stratadrake
    No, this is not Its Pronounced Tro PAY. The question remaining is to what extent this is actually a trope.
  • January 18, 2013
    Arivne
    ^^ I agree that Bonzo Madrid is a Bad Trope Namer because you have to be familiar with Enders Game to have any chance of figuring out from the name what the trope is about.
  • January 19, 2013
    dvorak
    ^And that, ladies and gentlemen, is why we discourage characters as tropes.
  • January 19, 2013
    lakingsif
    You could also note that since Loan Words generally lose their accents in American English, the accent is spoken on the wrong syllable, but this way is how they all pronounce it.

    One example I can think of is Malaga. It's in Andalucia which, aw, is another example. They should be pronounced MAH-lah-gah and An-dah-loo-SEE-ah, but more often than not will be pronounced Mah-LAH-gah and An-dah-LOO-shah (or An-dah-LOO-see-ah).
  • January 19, 2013
    lakingsif
    Hmm, something like 'The Pacific Is An Ocean'. Because WHY DOES EVERYBODY SAY 'PACIFIC' AND NOT 'SPECIFIC'!?
  • January 21, 2013
    blackfedora81
    The original poster agrees that Bonzo Madrid is probably not a good trope name, and wants to field possible alternatives.

    Let me try to clarify. This trope has 4 essential points:

    1. The name in question is easily mispronounced by the average member of the expected audience, is given to the character and audience in text format, and both the character and audience make the easy mistake.

    2. The "correct," and, "incorrect" pronunciations only have to be that way in-universe.

    3. The "correct" pronunciation is not done speciffically for the purpose of being snobbish, or a grammar nazi's berserk button. It is simply correct or incorrect in-universe. The name does not have to be the name of another character. It can be any proper noun.

    4. When the character is corrected, so is the audience. In other words, the audience makes the same easy mistake as the character and is corrected in-tandem.
  • January 21, 2013
    McKathlin
    It sounds like we agree that the original Trope Namer Syndrome name has to go. Until we come up with something more memorable, how about we call this one Pronunciation Corrected In Dialogue?
  • January 21, 2013
    Duckay
    I think I get the idea. A word or name is given in the text and there's not necessarily an obviously correct way of saying it, so the writer includes a character explaining how it's pronounced to make it clear?

    Eg.
    • in Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire, Hermione explains the foreigner Viktor Krum that her name is pronounced "Her-my-oh-nee", functioning as both a character moment for the two of them, and clearing up for the audience how "Hermione" is pronounced.
  • January 21, 2013
    Duncan
    In Hogfather, Jonathan Teatime corrects people on the pronunciation of his last name ("Teh-ah-time-eh") on his first appearance (and frequently throughout the book, as mispronunciation of it seems to be his only Berserk Button).
  • January 21, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • On Arthur Prunella is a big Henry Skeever[[note]]the Arthur version of Harry Potter[[/note]] fan and knows everything in all the books - but she, along with everyone else her age, mispronounces Henry's friend's name as "PURSE-a-fone." Mr. Ratburn, who happens to walk by as she says it, corrects her to "Per-SE-feh-nee." He knows nothing about the books, he just knows how one correctly pronounces Persephone.
    • Kiss Me Kate: Those Two Bad Guys who show up to collect a debt from Fred Graham consistently pronounce his name "gray-ham" no matter how many times he corrects them. (They also pronounce the b in "debt.")
  • January 22, 2013
    Arivne
    If the tropers who think this is not It Is Pronounced Tropay are correct, I have a strong suspicion that some of the examples on that page actually belong here.

    blackfedora81/OP: Would you check out It Is Pronounced Tropay and see if that's the case?
  • January 22, 2013
    Astaroth
    • Inverted in the Elder Scrolls IV Oblivion expansion pack, Shivering Isles, in which you can find a journal written by an adventurer. He writes about the 'Tsaesci', a race of snake people from Akavir, but because he's only heard the word spoken, he spells it 'Sayessie' (providing a pronunciation guide for the audience) until a scholar gets a look at the journal and insists on him writing the correct spelling.
  • January 22, 2013
    Prfnoff
    The Kiss Me Kate example falls under My Name Is Not Durwood, as might some others.
  • January 25, 2013
    blackfedora81
    Pronunciation Corrected in Dialogue is definitely a better trope name than Bonzo Madrid. Thanks! For now, I will change it to Pronunciation Corrected in Dialogue, but still think a better name could be found / made.

    For further clarity: The Arthur example only fits this ykttw if both Prunella and the audience see the easyly mispronouncable name in text format, and make the same mistake. Likewise for the Bones and Unhappillay Ever After. The Muppet Show example doesn't fit, since the audience and a character don't see it in print before mispronouncing snowth.

    This could be a one-shot, text-based The Watson for pronunciation, and that The Watson doesn't describe a character as much as a situation or event.
  • January 27, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Anime And Manga
    • The sixth episode of Panty And Stocking With Garterbelt is "Les Diabolique." Panty reads the title card aloud, mispronouncing it as "Less Diaboliques." Stocking corrects her, and Panty rereads it as "Lay Diaboliques."
  • January 27, 2013
    Tuckerscreator
    • Mr. Pendanski of Holes introduces himself to new members by showing them how to pronounce his name: "Pen-dance-key." It's a habit of his to make him seem more benign when he really isn't.
  • January 27, 2013
    StarSword
    ^The author, Louis Sachar, has used this in afterwords to his books since noticing that teachers tend to pronounce it "Sa-char", when it's "sacker, like a guy on a football team."
  • January 28, 2013
    blackfedora81
    The Les Diabolique example fits this ykttw if the viewers also see the name before the correction and makes the common error.

    The Holes example doesn't fit because the common pronunciation happens to be the right one in-universe.
  • January 29, 2013
    randomsurfer
    ^^^^^I don't see anything in the writeup saying that the audience is required to see the word in question. Admittedly it is the case in all the examples you've provided (all but one of which are Literature and therefore by definition we see the word) but nowhere in the description is that requirement stated.
  • January 29, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Television
    • A Running Gag by the late Pat Morita's character Ohara has a detective from out-of-town pursue a fugitive to Los Angeles, where he is told to contact one Lieutenant Ohara. The newbie is expecting a burly Irish O'Hara; Morita's toneless "Ohara" bursts that bubble.

    • Ned Beatty's title character Nick Szysznyk routinely needed to correct people unfamiliar with Cyrillic conventions.
  • January 29, 2013
    Shnakepup
    • The character Takeshi Kovacs from the hard sci-fi series of the same name by Richard K Morgan. Due to his multi-ethnic name, various characters in the novels mispronounce the last name, much to Kovacs's annoyance. In the first novel, he corrects someone (and the reader) by specifying that the last name's slavic origins make it "ko-VACH", not "ko-vax".
  • January 30, 2013
    lakingsif
    Just a question: why would the audience need clarification on how to pronounce 'Hermione'?
  • January 30, 2013
    McKathlin
    The pronunciation of a name spelled "Hermione" wasn't immediately obvious to this U.S. native troper on first reading; I guessed it as "Her me OWN", as Krum did. It's unclear whether J.K. Rowling thought that readers would need clarification on how Hermione's name is pronounced, but Krum needed it. So it might be an accidental example.
  • January 30, 2013
    Duncan
    ^ "Hermione" is an extremely rare name in America.
  • January 31, 2013
    troacctid
    Pronunciation Corrected In Dialogue is still a really awkward name.

    • Superman The Animated Series: In a rare non-print example, when Superman mispronounces Mr. Mxyzptlk's name as "Mix-ill-plick", Mxyzptlk uses helpful visual aids to demonstrate that the correct pronunciation is "Mix-yes-spit-lick."
  • February 2, 2013
    blackfedora81
    Pronunciation Corrected In Dialogue is indeed awkward, but it's better than what it was before. Does anyone have a better idea?
  • February 3, 2013
    NESBoy
    "In-Dialogue Pronunciation Correction"

  • February 4, 2013
    blackfedora81
    The Beavis And Butthead Do America example doesn't fit because "butthead" is not something the audience would likely mispronounce.
  • February 4, 2013
    troacctid
    Or just Pronunciation Correction. Or Correct The Pronunciation. Saying it's being corrected already carries the implication that someone got it wrong.
  • February 16, 2013
    robinjohnson
    ^^^^^^ Hermione is an extremely rare name in the UK too, but crops up in history and classical literature, as with many of the wizards' names. I'm pretty sure Rowling has said that she deliberately had Hermione correct Victor to correct the audience's pronunciation. (It hardly makes sense otherwise; why would Viktor be pronouncing Hermione's name as though he's only read it in a book before?)
  • February 27, 2013
    blackfedora81
    I think this has a somewhat better name now. Hats?
  • February 27, 2013
    thewriter
    ^^JK Bowling actually did put it in the book for the sake of the audience. She says that she received a lot of questions on fans about Hermione's name and had heard in person from fans more than once about "Her-my-own" or "Hermy-One." I'm paraphrasing but I think the answer to this could be answered on her website's faq page.
  • February 27, 2013
    thewriter
    Rowling*
  • February 27, 2013
    DRCEQ
  • February 28, 2013
    grenekni3t
  • February 28, 2013
    Hodor
    • In Game Of Thrones, Danaerys visits the city state of Qarth, which she pronounces as "Quarth", and sort of acts like she owns the place. She is corrected by a snooty member of its leadership that the place's name is pronounced "Karth". This correction is also for the benefit of the audience, since the original book series has No Pronunciation Guide.
  • February 28, 2013
    Guyven
    How about "Pronounced What-son" as a trope name? Even if that's not good, I like that it integrates the idea of The Watson into the name.
  • March 6, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^^^^^^^^ Are you from the UK? If you are, it's a different part to where I'm from because I know lots of people called Hermione (and two friends called Leia, too, so I didn't first understand why people had trouble with that).

    - This'll probably gain the same response, but 'Holmes' has an obvious pronunciation, from the view of all I know, which includes Americans, as well.
  • March 6, 2013
    OmarKarindu
    Since this is an In Universe Pronunciation guide, why not just cut to the chase and call it In Universe Pronunciation Guide?
  • March 6, 2013
    thewriter
    ^ I second that for simplicity's sake.

    • Also in the Dresden Files book White Night There's a character named "Anna" who corrects Harry's pronunciation of her name. Aside from how most English speakers would say the name on sight as "Aa-na," she pronounces it "Ah-na."
  • March 6, 2013
    troacctid
    I still like Pronunciation Correction.

    ^ "Aa-na" and "Ah-na" are the same...also, White Night has its own page
  • March 6, 2013
    thewriter
    ^I meant "Aah*" as in screaming and "Ah" as in "open up your mouth and say," or when you realize something.
  • March 6, 2013
    troacctid
    ^ "Aah" and "Ah" are the same too, except one is longer.
  • March 6, 2013
    thewriter
    ...Where I come from there is a distinct difference within the dialect. The common pronunciation of "Anna" would be to say it with "A" sound found in "animals" the example I gave she pronounces her name with the "A" sound found in "Amish"
  • March 7, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^^^^^ Isn't Anna usually pronounced 'Ah-na'? So putting "most English speakers say the name on sight as 'Aah-na'" is wrong. Most English speakers say 'Ah-na', with a short vowel sound at the start, like at the start of 'animals' or as in the name Hannah, too.

    So you wrote your phonetics the wrong way round. Or does she pronounce it 'Ay-na', as in 'amish', like you just said?
  • March 7, 2013
    thewriter
    What? Amish Is not pronounced "Ay-mish" it's pronounced "Ah-mish" with a short "ah" sound like in "almost" or "awesome." Anna or Anne/Ann is usually pronounced with the nasally "aah" sound found in "and" or "animal" or "Akron, Ohio," my old hometown.

  • March 8, 2013
    troacctid
    Well I know what you mean, since I actually listened to the audiobook myself recently. You just transcribed it in an ambiguous way. Maybe I should just pull up the quote, hang on.

    "And call me Anna, please." She pronounced her name with the Old World emphasis: Ah-nah.
  • March 8, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^^ I've always said it like in Hamish. It looks like you say it like in famish.

    Wait, so, it's Ar-nah as in 'are', not Ah-nah as in 'ah'? Because I have no idea what any of those attempts at phonetics are, sorry.
  • March 8, 2013
    thewriter
    ...Famish and Hammish are exact rhymes that both have the "a" sound found in "and" or "man." I could be wrong and "Hammish" is pronounced like "Hay-mish" but I've never heard it said as such.

    Amish is not an exact rhyme with Famish in that it does not have the same vowel sound. Amish has the muted "ah" sound found in "fall" or "awe" or even "cough"
  • March 8, 2013
    lakingsif
    Hamish is a Scottish name, hay-mish. Hammish describes when something is like ham. Probably. Ay-mish is wrong. Ah-mish is wrong. Is it a long vowel sound, then? Ar-mish. Like an orthodontist "say Ar".
  • March 8, 2013
    thewriter
    It's "Open your mouth and say 'Ah'" not "Ar." Also my friend's last name is Hammish Andy appears that you are right that it was originally pronounced as "Hay-mish" but in my area we stressed the "ham" part.

    Go to an online dictionary and listen to the pronunciationof "Amish" It's pronounced "Ah-mish."
  • March 8, 2013
    thewriter
    And "ay" is the long vowel pronunciation of "a."
  • March 8, 2013
    0blivionmobile
    Real Life: Having an regionally uncommon name can result in this. Someone from a more culturally Hispanic area would have difficulty reading an Eastern European name, and vice versa.
  • March 9, 2013
    randomsurfer
    I get the feeling that thewriter and lakingsif are Separated By A Common Language, with writer being a speaker of American English and laking speaking British English.

    Bearing in mind I'm not claiming to be an expert; but Brits put an "r" in some vowel sounds which don't have them in the States. Like "arse" pronounced "ass." At least that's my impression from "like an orthodontist 'say Ar'."
  • March 9, 2013
    lakingsif
    online dictionary. what a good idea. ^ I have no idea what kind of English I speak, I've been all over and it's pretty varied.
  • March 9, 2013
    troacctid
    Clearly a non-rhotic dialect.
  • March 9, 2013
    HeroicJay
    In Animorphs, the heroes discover that one Mr. DeGroot is looking for Tobias. When Tobias speaks to DeGroot's secretary, he asks for Mr. DeGroot (apparently pronounced as spelled) and is told that it is pronounced as "de-groat".
  • March 14, 2013
    troacctid
    Still not a fan of the title.
  • May 28, 2015
    rodneyAnonymous
    In Sojourn, Drizzt Do'Urden corrects a boy who pronounces his name "drizzit".
  • May 28, 2015
    lakingsif
    Oh, wow, this is back.
  • May 28, 2015
    calmestofdoves
    Got rid of the "folder" syntax as this is still a YKTTW, not a full-fledged trope page; cleaned up the DeGroots; indented the Ender sequel example; made various other formatting edits; and added the Stargate SG 1 example.

    I have an example that's a bit YMMV...
    • In His Dark Materials, the main character's name is Lyra. This American troper spent three whole books assuming that "Lyra" rhymed with "Kira": leer-uh. It wasn't until The Amber Spyglass, when a flock of harpies calls Lyra out in a lie by screaming "LIAR! LIAR! LIAR" over and over "until Lyra and Liar seemed one and the same" that it became clear "Lyra" was pronounced like "Liar": lie-ruh.

    I don't know if reading "Lyra" as "Lira" was a pervasive issue or if that was just my own idiosyncratic interpretation that my brain latched onto at the tender age of eleven when I first read The Golden Compass, but I would never have figured out what I was doing wrong if not for the In Universe Pronunciation Guide provided by the Lyra/Liar thing, so I'm tempted to include it regardless.

    ETA: Also, holy shit, this is from over two years ago? What??
  • May 29, 2015
    lakingsif
    ^ It got a bit stuck when it was understood that to some people, pronunciations seemed obvious, whilst others believed they were this trope. Hence, I think they all have to be YMMV unless Word Of God says that the guide to pronunciation was indeed for an audience that they believed wouldn't make a name out.

    So, like, there's a French-Austrian TV host whose name always appears on screen as 'Alice', because that's how it's spelt. Many English (and other non-Romantic) audiences pronounce this, well, 'Alice', so her fellow co-hosts or anyone else with her will address her with her name, however intrusively, at every opportunity because it's actually pronounced 'Elise'. They do that because, though the natural pronunciation for her, it isn't for many other people.

    However, we must assume that an author - for all intents and purposes - presumes that the audience knows full well how to say a word and the explanation is really just for a certain character's benefit. Like when Lucy tries to correct Mr Tumness - surely, CS Lewis didn't think that people can't say "wardrobe" or "spare room"? Thereby, even if the correction for the character did, in fact, correct a reader, it may not have been an intended trope (though are they always, with the pervasive nature of tropes nowadays?) nor may it apply to many other people and so it's YMMV - and perhaps mentioning exactly what dialect is common for the person who had the misunderstanding would be beneficial (e.g. "for people from X, this example...")
  • May 29, 2015
    Arivne
  • May 29, 2015
    calmestofdoves
    Perhaps the laconic and/or actual description would be better off as something like "Ambiguity or uncertainty on the part of the reader/viewer concerning the pronunciation (in text-based media) or the spelling (in visual media) of a word is explicitly cleared up within the flow of the narrative" instead of the more intent-based "Character X makes a mistake and when they are corrected, so is the reader," which definitely happens but excludes a lot of examples that are basically the same thing in different skins.

    ETA: Also, Arivne, why do you think potholing Ender's Shadow is unnecessary? Just doing the regular Literature/EndersShadow gives you Enders Shadow with no apostrophe, which I think is ugly, and it's standard to include links to works, so...
  • May 29, 2015
    lakingsif
    ^ someone should get Enders Shadow a custom title, then — I submitted one
  • May 29, 2015
    Illemar
    Apparently we need to link to pronunciation guides.

    Anyway, example:
    • In Deep Secret, Cornelius Punt introduces himself with his nickname, Kees, pronounced Case. (It's then spoilt by the narrators spelling it Case after that.)
  • May 29, 2015
    lakingsif
    Oh, one of Samuel Pepys' friends had written a poem with a rhyme scheme that should disclose how the man pronounced his surname, but it contrasts with his familial documents, so everyone is even more confused than before.
  • June 3, 2015
    randomsurfer
    Real Life: Actress Debora Kerr's last name is pronounced "Car" but people didn't get it, so Louis B. Meyer and MGM promoted her as "Kerr rhymes with star!"
  • June 3, 2015
    calmestofdoves
    I felt like "Aa-nuh" vs "Ah-nuh" was too ambiguous for people unfamiliar with the conventions of phonetic spelling, especially given the Separated By A Common Language back-and-forth above, so I put in "Anne-uh" vs "On-uh" instead, which I think is clearer.
  • August 21, 2015
    Koveras
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=i9hphetnfcq6b6a6kxmf396j