Created By: IfOnly on September 6, 2012 Last Edited By: IfOnly on September 12, 2012
Troped

Sir Verb-a-Lot

A knight's punny Meaningful Name that plays on Sir Lancelot

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Trope
In comedic medieval settings, a knight (usually one of the shining persuasion) will be introduced whose name sounds like "Sir Lancelot", only punnier. The "Lance" part will be replaced with a verb (often one that rhymes with "Lance", so "dance" and "prance" are common versions) and the "elot" with "a lot". Thus, we get a Meaningful Name which describes the knight's preferred activity. Note that spelling can vary (sometimes "elot" is left intact), but the punny meaning is always clear.

This is such a well-known trope that it has extended beyond this context, becoming a sort of "Stock Pun" used by characters, actual human beings and businesses who have nothing to do with knights.

Its roots in English legend make this Trope much more common in English-language and Western media. Obviously, being a comedic pun on the name of a fictional knight, it is in no way Truth in Television.


Examples

Advertising
  • Sir Shakes-a-Lot the milkshake-loving knight from Burger King's "Burger King Kingdom" ads.
  • Spam have recently introduced a mascot named Sir Can-A-Lot. Not to be confused with Spamalot.

Film
  • In Stuart Saves His Family, Stuart wanted to enter a contest by naming a cleaning product mascot "Sir Cleans-A-Lot". His father then nicknamed him "Sir Eats-A-Lot".
  • Jumanji has a store called "Sir Save-A-Lot".

Comic Books
  • DC Comics COO Geoff Johns came up with an idea for a Masters of the Universe character named Sir Laser-Lot when he was eight years old. Many years later, he would enter the official canon in a DC comics series written by Johns himself, with an action figure following later (see Toys entry, below).

The Internet
  • www.sirlinksalot.net is a collection of web directories.
  • www.sirjogalot.com is a blog about jogging and running.

Live-Action TV
  • Sir Killalot the house robot from Robot Wars.
  • Whenever The Muppets do anything based on the Arthurian legends, or anything that takes place in a medieval/fantasy setting, nearly every other character they put up will be a play on this.

Merchandise
  • Chef Boyardee's canned pasta product Sir Chomps-a-Lot.

Music
  • The musician Sir Mix-A-Lot. His use of this trope has been parodied by Robot Chicken (see below).
  • The name Sir Dance-A-Lot has been used by D Js and bands alike.

Real Life

Tabletop RPG
  • Paranoia supplement Acute Paranoia. One of the new secret societies in the book was the Knights of the Circular Object, which was partially inspired by the tales of King Arthur. One alias taken by a member of the society was "Sir Lanceabot".

Theme Parks
  • At Disneyland, there is a suit of armor on the Mr. Toad ride labeled "Sir Clinks-a-Lot." There are also non-knightly examples: an animatronic Indian that waves at the riverboat is informally called Chief Waves-a-Lot., and elsewhere in the park are two "cigar store Indian" sculptures sometimes referred to as Chief Stands-a-Lot and Chief Leans-a-Lot.

Toys
  • Sir Prance-A-Lot is one of those soft toys for babies with different parts with different textures and sounds.
  • As part of the He-Man and the Masters of the Universe line's 30th anniversary in 2012, an action figure based on a design Geoff Jons came up with when he was eight years old and dubbed Sir Laser-lot is to be released by Mattel.

TV Tropes

Video Games

Web Comics
  • Invoked in an Arthur, King of Time and Space strip:
    Lancelot: My mother wanted me to join the priesthood.
    Arthur: Then she ought to have named you Praysalot.
  • When Durkon's armour alerts enemies to the team's presence in one Webcomic/The Order of the Stick strip, Greenhilt takes to calling him Sir Clanksalot.
  • In one Bug! strip, one character responds to hearing the baby crying with the line "Hark. Sir Poops-a-lot requests an audience."

Western Animation
  • Yakko, Wakko and Dot are given the titles "Sir Yaks-A-Lot", "Sir Waks-A-Lot" and "Lady Dots-A-Lot" in one episode of Animaniacs.
  • "Sir Pantsalot of Dropseat Manor" in the Looney Tunes short "Knights Must Fall".
  • One Robot Chicken skit actually features Sir Mix-A-Lot as a member of King Arthur's court. He's the one who suggests the concept of the Round Table, via the song "Table Be Round" (a parody of "Baby Got Back").
  • From the Spongebob Squarepants episode "My Pretty Seahorse", after the customers at the Krusty Krab are complaining about their food not being brought to them;
    Mr. Krabs: Squidward! What's with all the nicknames!?!?
    Squidward: Why don't you ask Cowbob Ranchpants and his faithful companion, Sir Eats-A-Lot?
  • The hero of the children's animated television series The Adventures Of Sir Prancelot.
  • There was an episode of The Book Of Pooh, where Pooh, Piglet, Rabbit, and Tigger decided to become 'The Knights of the Roundish Table', after Owl read them the story of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Tigger became Sir Bounce-A-Lot, Piglet became Sir Piglet Of Small, Pooh became Sir Pooh-cival, and Rabbit became Sir Hairyhead.
  • The mascot pig kidnapped by Homer and his roommates in the Simpsons episode "Homer Goes to College" is named Sir Oinks-A-Lot.
Community Feedback Replies: 45
  • September 6, 2012
    chicagomel
    There was a canned pasta product named Sir Chomps-A-Lot for a while, it had a crocodile/alligator mascot.
  • September 6, 2012
    KTera
    • Anders from Dragon Age used to have a cat named Ser Pounce-a-Lot.
  • September 6, 2012
    NimmerStill
    • In Stuart Saves His Family, Stuart wanted to enter a contest by naming a cleaning product mascot "Sir Cleans-A-Lot". His father then nicknamed him "Sir Eats-A-Lot".
    (And yes, I have that memorized.)
  • September 6, 2012
    X2X
    One Robot Chicken skit actually features Sir Mix-A-Lot as a member of King Arthur's court. He's the one who suggests the concept of the Round Table, via the song "Table Be Round" (a parody of "Baby Got Back").
  • September 6, 2012
    CaveCat
    • From the Spongebob Squarepants episode "My Pretty Seahorse", after the customers at the Krusty Krab are complaining about their food not being brought to them;
      Mr. Krabs: Squidward! What's with all the nicknames!?!?
      Squidward: Why don't you ask Cowbob Ranchpants and his faithful companion, Sir Eats-A-Lot?
  • September 6, 2012
    spacemarine50
    The trope Sir Swears Alot is an example.
  • September 6, 2012
    Tallens
    • Whenever The Muppets do anything based on the Arthurian legends, or anything that takes place in a medieval/fantasy setting, nearly every other character they put up will be a play on this.
  • September 6, 2012
    KarjamP
    I like the current name.

    Why was it tagged "Better Name" (twice)?
  • September 7, 2012
    MorganWick
    Using "Trope" as a placeholder is deprecated.
  • September 7, 2012
    KarjamP
    ^What do you mean?

    Please point to me the page where that's stated.
  • September 7, 2012
    Arivne
    ^ Naming A Trope, the second-to-last entry.
  • September 7, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop RPG
    • Paranoia supplement Acute Paranoia. One of the new secret societies in the book was the Knights of the Circular Object, which was partially inspired by the tales of King Arthur. One alias taken by a member of the society was "Sir Lanceabot".
  • September 7, 2012
    KarjamP
    ^^ Okay, then.

    Still liked the name, though. :'(
  • September 7, 2012
    NimmerStill
    ^Me too. It's really annoying when guidelines like Naming A Trope advise against half the tropes still in existence (most of which have no Trope Repair Shop entries in sight).
  • September 7, 2012
    aurora369
  • September 7, 2012
    polarbear2217
  • September 7, 2012
    TheNinth
    Sir Blanks-A-Lot. Sir X-A-Lot.
  • September 7, 2012
    KarjamP
    I like Sir Puns A Lot is nice.

    @Nimmer Still: The reason for that could be Grandfather Clause.
  • September 7, 2012
    NimmerStill
    ^I'm sure it is. You know what the original Grandfather Clause was right?

    But Sir Puns A Lot is ok too. Or maybe Sir X-A-Lot.
  • September 7, 2012
    MrRuano
  • September 8, 2012
    KarjamP
    ^ I think the trope's about names which rhymes with "Lancelot".

    Therefore, I don't think that's an example.
  • September 8, 2012
    DaibhidC
  • September 8, 2012
    Karalora
    Non-knightly example: At Disneyland, an animatronic Indian that waves at the riverboat is informally called Chief Waves-a-Lot. Elsewhere in the park are two "cigar store Indian" sculptures sometimes referred to as Chief Stands-a-Lot and Chief Leans-a-Lot.
  • September 8, 2012
    aurora369
    Sir Puns A Lot sounds like a character who speaks in lame puns.
  • September 8, 2012
    CaveCat
    Another example;

    • There was an episode of The Book Of Pooh, where Pooh, Piglet, Rabbit, and Tigger decided to become 'The Knights of the Roundish Table', after Owl read them the story of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Tigger became Sir Bounce-A-Lot, Piglet became Sir Piglet Of Small, Pooh became Sir Pooh-cival, and Rabbit became Sir Hairyhead.
  • September 8, 2012
    LordGro
    Sir Knight-a-lot, Sir Spoofed-a-lot, Sir Name-a-lot.
  • September 8, 2012
    Tallens
    I think Sir Name-A-Lot is the most applicable name thus far.
  • September 8, 2012
    aurora369
  • September 8, 2012
    Tallens
    Or maybe Sir Verb A Lot.
  • September 8, 2012
    spacemarine50
    Is this trope about funny knight names in general, or knight names that follow the Sir-X-Alot format?
  • September 9, 2012
    LordGro
    The latter. -- Sir Verb-a-lot is good too; the punny part is not always a verb, but it's close enough.
  • September 9, 2012
    Routerie
    Yeah Sir Verb-a-lot.
  • September 9, 2012
    Annandul
    I like Sir Named-a-Lot.
  • September 9, 2012
    IfOnly
    So now we have loads of potential names suggested by various people. Is it up to me to pick one, or is there some kind of vote? If it's the former, I'm leaning towards Sir Name-A-Lot.
  • September 9, 2012
    Routerie
    That sounds like someone who names a lot, or who has lots of names.
  • September 9, 2012
    KarjamP
    Sir Verb-a-lot is nice.
  • September 9, 2012
    dalek955
    • In one Bug strip, one character responds to hearing the baby crying with the line "Hark. Sir Poops-a-lot requests an audience."
  • September 10, 2012
    Karalora
    There's also a more conventional example at Disneyland--a suit of armor on the Mr. Toad ride is labeled "Sir Clinks-a-Lot."
  • September 10, 2012
    abk0100
    Sir Verbs A Lot ++

    or Sir Puns A Lot, that works too
  • September 10, 2012
    Kayube
    Jumanji has a store called "Sir Save-A-Lot".
  • September 10, 2012
    aurora369
    Probably also possible with location names, spoofing "Camelot" in this case. But I can only recall Spamalot right now.
  • September 11, 2012
    peccantis
    Chef Boyardee's canned pasta product Sir Chomps-a-Lot.

    This is about a product, i.e. a work, it shouldn't be under Real Life examples. Use Merchandise or something like that instead.
  • September 11, 2012
    Andygal
    The Sims 2 has a "pet brick" called "Sir Bricks-a-lot".
  • September 11, 2012
    IfOnly
    OK, I've taken the suggestions on board and gone for Sir Verbs-A-Lot, and added loads more examples. Is this ready for some hats now?

    aurora: I don't think there's enough examples of that to warrant including it, like you I can't think of any except Spamalot.
  • September 12, 2012
    LordGro
    I think 'Sir Verb-a-lot' (without the s) would be slightly better than 'Verbs-a-Lot', as the s does not necessarily occur. Otherwise, I think it's ready for launching.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=hmaom3fhlppg8ul7j2o1wqjh&trope=SirVerbaLot