Created By: FoolsEditAccount on July 28, 2011 Last Edited By: FoolsEditAccount on August 1, 2011
Troped

Immortality Inducer

A magical or technological device that grants immortality.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Through magic or science, a character manages to create a device that grants immortality. How the device works can be very varied -- it may be Powered by a Forsaken Child, thus invoking Immortality Immorality, or it could be powered by harmless Techno Babble. The extent to which it works and what kind of immortality it bestows also varies. It might only work on the user/wearer, or it could work on anyone in the vicinity. It may also have bad side effects, especially if it's a prototype or created by a Mad Scientist.

In some cases, characters may try to merge with this item in order to gain its effects permanently. This may work, or it might backfire horribly, depending on the story and what the object is.

Likely to be a MacGuffin or Plot Coupon. Soul Jar is a subtrope. If the Immortality Inducer can be mass-produced, it may lead to a Society of Immortals. Contrast Artifact of Death.

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Bleach: the Hogyoku was originally created to eliminate the barrier between shinigami and hollow. Later, it is revealed to grant the heart's truest desires; assuming the Hogyoku is exposed to twice captain level reiatsu, and that one has the inherent potential to fulfill their wish. And then...? Aizen merged with it and was somehow granted immortality. So... either he was immortal to begin with, or had the potential to become...?
  • The Grand Panacea from Baccano! has this effect. There's also lesser versions of it that grant invulnerability but not immunity to aging.

Card Games
  • The CCG Illuminati had the card Immortality Serum, which not only made the affected character indestructible, it could be played on an opponent's characters to make them defect!

Literature

Mythology
  • The Fountain of Youth.
  • This was said to be one of the many effects of the Philosopher's Stone.
    • The ultimate goal of Chinese alchemy, rather than the western "lead into gold," was to create an elixir that granted immortality.

Video Games
  • The Trope Namer is the +ii emitter in I Miss the Sunrise, affectionately referred to as the "immortality inducer" by some characters. It works by emitting radiation that stops cell aging, and is mass-produced, effectively making the entire human race immortal. It induces type II immortality.
    • In the sequel, The Reconstruction, it is also the "artifact" that Havan finds and uses to destroy the world. Tezkhra reveals in the Golden Ending that there are five in total. Four are destroyed or deactivated by Tezkhra, so the fifth is likely a Sequel Hook.
  • Jacob Crow in TimeSplitters achieves immortality by merging himself with one of these, or turning himself into one, it would seem. The good? He is immortal and can time-travel at will. The bad? His body is plastered to a giant bipedal mech, and he has absolutley no hands whatsoever.
  • In Metal Gear Solid 4, Vamp, who previously demonstrated his immortality in Metal Gear Solid 2, is revealed to have nanomachines (what else?) in his body that enhance his already impressive natural healing abilities, making him practically immortal. Naturally, the only way to beat him later on is to inject him with a shot that supresses his nanomachines.
  • The Touhou series has the famous Hourai Elixir, used by Lunarians such as Princess Kaguya and her deadly rival Fujiwara no Mokou.

Unknown
  • Time spores, a.k.a. "Fruits of Time", in Mnemosyne.
  • In Gor, humans have type II immortality thanks to "stabilization serums" - shots - developed by the Caste of Physicians; basically, it's an immunization against old age. In one book, a woman from Earth actually gets de-aged from her 60s to age 18 or so thanks to the serum. The priest-kings, alien gods of the planet, have even more advanced stabilization serums which make them immortal until they decide to die, although they can be killed.
Community Feedback Replies: 30
  • July 28, 2011
    Earnest
    The CCG Illuminati had the card Immortality Serum, which not only made the affected character indestructible, it could be played on an opponent's characters to make them defect!
  • July 28, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Jacob Crow in TimeSplitters achieves immortality by merging himself with one of these, or turning himself into one, it would seem. The good? He is immortal and can time-travel at will. The bad? His body is plastered to a giant bipedal mech, and he has absolutley no hands whatsoever.
  • July 28, 2011
    MiinU

    Anime and Manga

    • Bleach: the Hogyoku was originally created to eliminate the barrier between shinigami and hollow. Later, it is revealed to grant the heart's truest desires; assuming the Hogyoku is exposed to twice captain level reiatsu, and that one has the inherent potential to fulfill their wish. And then...? Aizen merged with it and was somehow granted immortality. So... either he was immortal to begin with, or had the potential to become...?
  • July 28, 2011
    Ekuran
    Mythology
    • The Fountain of Youth.
  • July 28, 2011
    Bisected8
    • The Grand Panacea from Baccano has this effect. There's also lesser versions of it that grant invulnerability but not immunity to aging.
  • July 28, 2011
    billybobfred
  • July 29, 2011
    Koveras
    • Time spores, a.k.a. "Fruits of Time", in Mnemosyne.
  • July 29, 2011
    Arivne
    Anime and Manga
    • Add Bleach
      • In the Bount filler arc in the anime, a failed Soul Society experiment changed some humans into immortal Bounts.
  • July 29, 2011
    magicparade
    Ilyasviel von Einsbern from Fate/Stay Night is very bossy towards her servant Berserker, and even to Shirou.
  • July 29, 2011
    magicparade
    OMFG I replied on the wrong one sorry bout that... :P
  • July 29, 2011
    Koveras
    ^ Bad troper, no biscuit.
  • July 29, 2011
    shinehro
    The titular Dragonballs, among everything else they can do at least 3 villains wanted to use them for this purpose.
  • July 29, 2011
    FoolsEditAccount
    ^ The dragon balls can grant any wish, though, not just immortality. This trope is for objects that just grant immortality.
  • July 29, 2011
    billybobfred
    Does it have to be immortality only, or can it be a limited set of things, one of which is immortality? Cause the Philosopher's Stone also makes gold, but those two things are all it does.
  • July 29, 2011
    madelinemary
    Wouldn't the Horcruxes in Harry Potter count too?
  • July 29, 2011
    Earnest
    Contrast Artifact Of Death. Hmm, considering all the other artifacts we have, should we consider naming this Artifact Of Immortality?
  • July 29, 2011
    FoolsEditAccount
    @ Billybobfred: Hrm, actually, I guess I should backpedal on my previous statement. I suppose that if it explicitly grants immortality as one of its powers, even if it isn't the only one, it counts. Still, something that grants any wish doesn't really count, since its power is wishing; you can use them and not gain immortality.

    @ Madelinemary: Does making a Horcrux grant immortality? It's been a while since I read the books. If so, then yes.

    @ Earnest: Hm...maybe. We'd lose the Trope Namer and Added Alliterative Appeal, though. :(
  • July 29, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Erm, the Time Splitters example belongs under "video games"...
  • July 29, 2011
    Bisected8
    And Mnemosyne belongs under "Anime And Manga".
  • July 29, 2011
    Earnest
    @Fools Edit Account: We don't have to, especially since some of these aren't object at all. At the least, it'd be a good redirect for searching etc.
  • July 29, 2011
    hevendor717
    @Fools Edit Account: The Dragonballs can't grant ANY wish. They seem to be incapable of killing people outright. So the next biggest thing you can ask for is immortality, and they are infamous for that.
  • July 30, 2011
    billybobfred
    Making a Horcrux grants immortality as long as the Horcrux still exists. It's pretty much the exact definition of a Soul Jar, but a thing can be two tropes at once.
  • July 30, 2011
    FoolsEditAccount
    @ Hevendor717: The immortality isn't automatic, though. You can use the dragon balls to make a wish without becoming immortal. The artifact has to be gauranteed to give the recipient immortality, even if it's one of multiple powers. The dragon balls are just wish-granting magical artifacts; too general.

    @ Billybobfred: That's a good point; how does Soul Jar fit into this? Maybe as a subtrope?
  • July 30, 2011
    goodtimesfreegrog
  • July 30, 2011
    FoolsEditAccount
    Erm. I haven't played Metal Gear Solid 4, but I've been meaning to, so you should probably add that yourself.
  • July 30, 2011
    randomsurfer
    On Gor humans have type II immortality thanks to Stabilization Serums - shots - developed by the Caste of Physicians; basically it's an immunization against old age. In one book a woman from Earth actually gets de-aged from her 60s to age 18 or so thanks to the serum. The Priest-Kings, alien gods of the planet, have even more advanced stabilization serums which make them immortal until they decide to die, although they can be killed.
  • July 31, 2011
    TwoGunAngel
    • The ultimate goal of Chinese alchemy, rather than the western "lead into gold," was to create an elixir that granted immortality.
    • The Touhou series has the famous Hourai Elixir, used by Lunarians such as Princess Kaguya and her deadly rival Fujiwara no Mokou.
  • July 31, 2011
    KamenZero
    Tuck Everlasting is a story about a girl who meets a family that has become ageless after discovering the Fountain of Youth.
  • July 31, 2011
    Bisected8
    No objections here. Although it might be prudent to wait for more hats.
  • July 31, 2011
    FoolsEditAccount
    Well, Society Of Immortals already has five hats, and they have to launch together since they reference each other.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=h6srqdwq1klo690oqg3lslcg