Created By: PrfnoffJuly 30, 2009
Troped

Ac CENT Upon The Wrong Syl LA Ble

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When the meter of a song (or poem) results in a word being pronounced with incorrect accentuation.

Whether this is intentional or unintentional, it's usually because the song was done by some foreigner who hasn't quite grasped the rules of stress in their second language, but sometimes they're just being completely incompetent about setting lyrics to music.

Intentional examples

  • The somewhat obscure Trope Namer, "Sing a Tropical Song," was written for the 1943 movie musical Happy Go Lucky. The Andrews Sisters also recorded it.
  • In the second act of Wagner's Die Meistersinger, Sachs strikes his cobbler's hammer each time Beckmesser does this.

Unintentional examples

  • The stirring aria "The Trumpet Shall Sound" from Handel's Messiah has the word "incorruptible" wrongly accented. This is usually corrected in performance, though the corrected version doesn't quite fit Handel's melody.

(I was the OP, but someone edited this page to get irrelevantly pedantic about how Boba Fett's name is supposed to be pronounced.)
Community Feedback Replies: 23
  • July 18, 2009
    calronmoonflower
    If this does launch I suggest that Accent Upon The Wrong Syllable as a redirect.
  • July 18, 2009
    Prfnoff
    It won't need that as a redirect if it isn't ptitled.
  • July 18, 2009
    Ryusui
    This is a broader trope than described. It's the key feature of the G-Man's speech patterns in the Half Life series.
  • July 18, 2009
    Magus
    Is this similar to It Is Pronounced Tro PAY?
  • July 18, 2009
    Kuciwalker
    No.
  • July 18, 2009
    foxley
    "Michelle, My Belle" by the Beatles.
  • July 18, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    It's when you put the emPHAA-sis on the wrong syLLAA-ble
  • July 19, 2009
    01d55
    Since the G-Man is such a good example (a sample of his speech suffices as an explanation) G-Talk seems like a good name.
  • July 19, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    Worth a mention: This is a semi-regular system in English. In The Wire, they make a point of using the dialect word/pronunciation PO-lice. As in "a police" not "the police".

    I don't know if there are other works that use this rule to make it's own words.

    And for the record, this is often if not always how It Is Pronounced Tro PAY works, even in the title.

  • July 19, 2009
    Frank75
    Often in So Bad Its Good works. Unfortunately I can't name specific examples.
  • July 22, 2009
    FalconPain
    How about quite possibly the most famous video game song with lyrics of all time, to the point of being a Trope Namer?

    Yes, One Winged Angel. Even worse, all relevant lyrics are taken from Carmina Burana, in which they are stressed correctly.
    ESTuANS inTERiUS, IRa VEheMENti...
    SOR imMANis, ET inANis...
  • July 22, 2009
    somerandomdude
    Apparently, Scar thinks it's perfectly okay to pronounce "decades" as "de-CADES", as evidenced in his Villain Song, "Be Prepared."
  • July 30, 2009
    johnnye
    Actually a few posher Brits do pronounce it deCADES. Drives me up the wall myself...
  • July 30, 2009
    Stormtroper
    This goTTA be a self deMONstraTING arTIcle... right?
  • July 30, 2009
    Kilyle
    I'd say so :D
  • July 30, 2009
    Prfnoff
    @Ryusui: I'm not convinced that broadening this trope is a good idea.
  • July 30, 2009
    Saintheart
  • August 2, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    This happens a lot in the musical 1776, especially with variations on the word "independence": "Just tell the Congress to declare I Ndependen CYYYYYYY..."
  • August 2, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    In The Rise and Fall Of The City of Mahagonny the protagonist is called Jimmy Mahonney, pronounced MAH-Honee, so some American versions, to keep it along the music, rename him Jimmy Mac Intyre (Funny enough, even when the usual American pronuciation is Ma-HOH-nee, the original Irish one is indeed MAH-honne)
  • August 3, 2009
    Deckard Canine
    The Hunt For Red October had a moment noted in What Women Want: "'Adversary'? Don't you mean 'adversary', old man?"
  • August 3, 2009
    Umptyscope
    The phrase itself was used by Mike Myer's character in View From the Top (that horrible stewardess-training movie.)
  • August 4, 2009
    Kriegsmesser
  • August 4, 2009
    random surfer
    The phrase has been used several times over the course of...whatever. One I remember was from The Facts Of Life.

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