Created By: Nocturna on August 29, 2012 Last Edited By: Nocturna on July 18, 2013

Magic Fire

Fire which has magical properties.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
This is one of the many fire-related tropes that were identified as part of the Kill It with Fire TRS thread. Name suggestions and description/definition refinement suggestions are welcome and encouraged.

Indicies: This Index Is On Fire


Generally, fire conjured through magic will have properties that normal fire doesn't. A common variation is the ability to burn without fuel -- almost all magic fire can do that. Otherwise how could you do stupidy dangerous things like fling around mid-air fireballs?

Other possible properties of magical fire include, but are not limited to:

Those who have the power to Play With Fire often use Magic Fire. Compare Cold Flames, which appear to be fire but are just mind tricks that don't burn.


Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Film]]
  • In the movie She, the moon shining into a special underground chamber in the lost city creates a magical blue fire that turns mortal humans into immortals and causes people who're already immortal to instantly age to death.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]] [[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
  • In Basic Dungeons & Dragons, Halfling clan strongholds each have a Crucible of Blackflame. Blackflame was a strange reverse fire that "burned" ashes and returned them to their original form.
  • In GURPS: Magic you can create "Essential Flame" which will actually burn water elementals. A pyromaniac mage actually has a lot of fun options, besides the ever popular "Explosive Fireball" there is "Burning Death" which incinerates target from the inside out even if they're magically protected from fire.
[[/folder]]


Community Feedback Replies: 12
  • October 15, 2012
    ArcadesSabboth
    Well, I'll start the examples with a movie that I cannot, on good conscience, recommend anybody watch.

    In the movie She, the moon shining into a special underground chamber in the lost city creates a magical blue fire that turns mortal humans into immortals and causes people who're already immortal to instantly age to death.
  • October 16, 2012
    Koveras
  • October 17, 2012
    Arivne
    Tabletop RPG
    • Basic Dungeons And Dragons. Halfling clan strongholds each had a Crucible of Blackflame. Blackflame was a strange reverse fire that "burned" ashes and returned them to their original form.
  • October 22, 2012
    ArcadesSabboth
    I think this should be the supertrope to Sacred Flames, Burnless Fire, and Hellfire. Technicolor Fire and Fire Purifies should just be related tropes.
  • November 10, 2012
    DracMonster
    Not to be confused with Magic Misfire.
  • July 11, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    I don't think wildfire (from A Song Of Ice And Fire) qualifies for this. It's pretty obviously based on the Real Life Greek fire, and the way it's presented in the story strongly suggests it's of a chemical rather than magical nature.
  • July 11, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    In Harry Potter And The Philosophers Stone, Hermione thrice uses the "Bluebell Flames" spell which creates bright blue, waterproof flames that can heat without burning -- in the first case Hermione, Harry, and Ron warm themselves with a jam jar full of such fire. However, apparently the spell will burn certain materials like clothing and plants, which is shown in the other two appearances.
  • July 11, 2013
    Generality
    Also from Harry Potter:

    • Fiendfyre, seen in Deathly Hallows, is a living flame that seeks targets and grows rapidly as it consumes. It is very difficult to control. As it hunts, it takes the shape of various magical creatures.

    • In the Sword Of Truth series, Wizard's Fire is a standard ability of wizards that conjures a flame that is extra virulent, seeking targets and resisting extinguishment. An upgrade is Wizard's Life Fire, which uses the wizard's life force, killing him in order to create an enhanced burst of flame.
  • July 11, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Comic Books
    • Doctor Doom tried using the Flames of Falroth to reassemble his destroyed body. That body was obliterated when the Silver Surfer fought Tyros the Terrible, and they plummeted onto Doom's immobile armor. Doom's mind occupied the body of an American commoner, thanks to the Ovoid mind-switching technique. The Flames of Falroth produced a surprising result: they summoned the Beyonder!
  • July 11, 2013
    DAN004
    • In Street Fighter IV, Dhalsim said that the fires he breathes out are actually just illusionary. Of course, even if you wished it were fake it still looks like a regular fire... Which, since it's a video game, doesn't continually cauterize the enemy or giving them burn scars anyway.
  • July 18, 2013
    Melkior
    Comic Books:
    • Firefall from Rom, Space Knight commands the Living Flame. It's called living because the fire itself is sentient and so can choose not to obey if its wielder is trying to use the flame for dishonorable purposes.
  • July 18, 2013
    DAN004
    • X Men: The flames generated by the Phoenix Force are capable of sustaining itself in the outer space. They're also hotter than the stars.
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