Created By: Bakazuki on October 11, 2012 Last Edited By: Bakazuki on October 20, 2012
Troped

A Funeral Attended By Assholes

Funerals are a place to pay dues to the dead, yet the attendees do anything but.

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A funeral is a service that allows a deceased's family and friends to congregate in one place to celebrate the deceased's life and pay their respects. To do so is considered common courtesy and practice. So what do some people do once the family is assembled?

How about doing the exact opposite of that by behaving in extremely tactless and inappropriate ways that would have the deceased rolling in their coffins if they knew?

Sometimes this disrespect comes in the form of discussions that are brought up around or even at the time the proceedings begin. Perhaps the deceased is an adult involved in on of the ends of an inheritance dispute. Maybe the deceased was survived by an illegitimate child or, even worse, a child that none of the relatives are completely willing to take to take custody.

In any event, the attendees of the funeral will be all too eager to talk about those matters than to mourn, not realizing that talking about them is putting their selfishness and spite out in the open.

Other times, disrespect or lack of concern toward the matter at hand show in their actions. After all, attending the funeral in improper dress or fooling around with whatever device is in possession instead of paying attention to the pastor or the procession are a few of the best ways to show love and care to the dead.

And that's not touching on those who are much more direct about their scorn toward the deceased. If the deceased was a Jerk Ass or guilty of other negative qualities in life, then expect people to gossip about their faults or spit on his coffin.

There are sometimes people who don't even have to misbehave. If you're attending a funeral for a free meal and other things for your own self-interest, then the dead would have every right to be pissed off at you.

This should not be confused with its Sister Trope, The Fun in Funeral (though overlap is possible). The latter involves wacky situations in a funeral played for humor that occur out of the characters' control or because of their idiocy, while this trope specifically involves rude, uncaring, spiteful, or simply Jerkass behavior and statements about the deceased and/or his family made during what is supposed to be a solemn event. This can be done for either drama or comedy.

This may also overlap with And There Was Much Rejoicing, depending on the context.

Contrast with Never Speak Ill of the Dead.

As a Death Trope, this trope is Spoilered Rotten by nature, and many examples here will spoil a work unless the funeral is part of someone's backstory. Unmarked spoilers below.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Sangatsu no Lion: Rather than attend his parents and sister's funeral just to mourn for them and comfort him, Rei's aunts and uncles are arguing over who takes over his grandfather's hospital in his father's place, with one aunt in particular expressing half-hearted sympathy and "promising" Rei that she will send him to a "nice" institution. Meanwhile, the rest of the family is gossiping about them. All this is punctuated when Kouda, a friend of his father's, glances toward his family and implicitly notes how none of them are paying attention and giving real comfort to Rei, before taking the initiative to take Rei in as his ward and student.
  • In Bunny Drop, many of the family members attending Grandpa Sou's funeral are shocked to learn that he recently had an illegitimate child, Rin, shortly before his death. Her presence at the funeral isn't particularly welcomed and they mostly ignore her. When the time comes for the family to talk about what to do with her, shortly after the actual funeral proceedings, the discussion quickly devolves into an outlet for expressing their anger toward the situation and talking about how odd they find Rin and her dubious origins.
  • During Yusuke's funeral at the start of YuYu Hakusho, while Kuwabara goes on a screaming fit about Yusuke dying, his outburst is an act of genuine mourning. In contrast, their school principal calls out some teachers who are at the funeral making snide comments about both Yusuke and Kuwabara's behavior.
  • Fruits Basket:
    • When Katsuya Honda passes away, his relatives' conversations during the funeral ceremony quickly devolve from the circumstances surrounding his death to expressing their disapproval of Kyoko by berating or gossiping about her, saying that Katsuya was better off single. In a separate recollection of the same funeral, Tohru's grandfather brings up how the relatives would say disparaging remarks toward Tohru right in her face, thinking she would not understand.
    • Kyo's biological father chooses his mother's funeral ceremony to start scene/argument with Kyo, using the latter's inability to approach his mother's grave in front of the family as an excuse.

Comics

Film - Live-Action
  • In the Audrey Hepburn movie Charade, virtually the only people to attend the late Charles Lampert's funeral besides his widow are his three former partners in crime, who are mainly attending to see if he's Faking the Dead and are more disgusted than sorry for his death.
  • In Gran Torino, the funeral of Walt Kowalski's wife had some disrespect shown from some attendees. One of the granddaughters was dresses fairly inappropriately is fiddling around on her cell phone during the service. Walt's kids start asking Walt if he wants to go to a "nice retirement place" so they could sell the house, and the same disrespectful grandchild starts asking whether she could have some of the furniture and other items in the couch.
  • In Amazon Women on the Moon, a man's funeral turns into a comedy roast.
  • Film adaptations of A Christmas Carol usually go with And There Was Much Rejoicing, but The Muppet Christmas Carol, while not actually showing the funeral, had three pigs saying they'll only go to Scrooge's "if lunch is provided".

Film - Animated
  • In Bebe's Kids, Robin meets Jamika at a funeral, where "everyone was there, cause everyone was glad he was gone." People are seen drinking, laughing and playing dominoes, while the only one grieving was the widow.

Literature
  • A Charles Exbrayat story has an important member of a French town's funeral attended by all the town's society, along with many lower class people. The two cops on his murder case overhear the conversations, and one quotes a Chinese proverb: "There is nothing lacking from a rich man's funeral, except someone to mourn him".
  • In Making Money, Topsy Lavish's funeral is attended by her relatives, a family of rich, selfish, squabbling assholes who do nothing but glare at each other throughout the ceremony, waiting for each other to start something. Nontheless, Cosmo considered it a "decently dignified occasion" spoiled only by Hubert, who was the only one actually mourning.
  • In the supplementary novels for The Evillious Chronicles by mothy, one of the main characters, Elluka Clockworker attend to the funeral of and "old friend" Leonheart Avadonia, apparently just to call him an idiot, and leaves.

Live-Action TV
  • In Two and a Half Men, Charlie has a dream in which he attends his own funeral (as a ghost). At the funeral, women spit on his coffin, the eulogy is filled with derogatory jokes, and Alan ends the service by inviting the congregation back to his beach house for a wake/luau.
  • In The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, when Phillip Banks' political opponent dies, everyone save for Will attends his funeral primarily to check if he's really dead. When Will proclaims that he was the one that killed him (albiet through telling him to drop dead) as he attempts to call them out on it, the attendees give him a standing ovation.

Machinima
  • Red vs. Blue has three "funeral" scenes (the deceased in question were still living), and all are about people being completely disrespectful at funerals, sometimes for their own agendas, sometimes just because they're jerks.
    • In Episode 51, Church (the "dead" guy) is the one who wants a funeral; Tucker calls it lame and wanders off.
    • In Episode 83, Griff turns Sarge's funeral into a comedy roast of Sarge, and Simmons uses the opportunity to campaign for Sarge's job.
    • In the Season 9 Episode 14, it turns out no one remembers anything about Simmons except he liked gum and talked a lot.

Real Life
  • The Jolley Gang was a group of unpleasant funeral-crashers, who blagged their way into funerals on the pretext that they knew the deceased, so as to get at the free food / booze. Victoria Coren wrote a couple of scathing articles about them, after they targeted her father's funeral.
  • Fred Phelps Sr. is an American pastor infamous for his anti-gay slogans and beliefs. One of the activities his congregation is known for going around veterans' funerals and claiming that God condemned them to die because our nation tolerate "fags."

Recorded and Stand-Up Comedy
  • During the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, Bill Engvall offered the following "You might be a redneck" joke:
    "If you've ever opened a beer during a eulogy, you might be a redneck."
    • And after Bill finished explaining this one (it was his uncle Jack), Larry, Ron, and Jeff improv'ed the following:
      Jeff: Mama looks good, don't she? *mimes drinking*
      Ron: That ain't Mama. *drinks*
      Larry: Naw, that's her, they just shaved her beard off!

Western Animation
  • The Simpsons:
    • When Mr. Burns is thought to be dead, various dignitaries come to his funeral just to spit in his grave. So many in fact, that the grave has to be drained afterwards.
  • In The Boondocks episode Wingmen, Robert Freeman's longtime "friend" Moe passes away, and he is then asked to read a pre-written eulogy. At first, everyone at the funeral acts as if Moe iss the best at everything. He is being given credit for things Robert did in World War II, all the women swoon for him, etc. Robert finally breaks all the lies by announcing how much of a jerk Moe really was. Everyone else then starts agreeing and pointing out how he owed many of them money and other negative aspects about him.
  • Daria gives us an example in the episode Murder, She Snored. Although the funeral occurs in Daria's dream, nobody really has anything nice to say. Ms. Barch uses it as an excuse for another feminist rant, Mack's eulogy basically insults Kevin, and to top it off, Daria and Jane wear Hawaiian shirts for the occasion.


Indices: Funeral Tropes, Death Trope, Spoilered Rotten

(Rolling Updates)
Community Feedback Replies: 55
  • October 11, 2012
    Chabal2
    An Exbrayat story has an important member of a French town's funeral attended by all the town's society, along with many lower class people. The two cops one the murder case overhear the conversations, and one quotes a Chinese proverb: "There is nothing lacking from a rich man's funeral, except someone to mourn him".
  • October 11, 2012
    TBTabby
    In Making Money, Topsy Lavish's funeral is attended by her relatives, a family of rich, selfish, squabbling assholes who do nothing but glare at each other throughout the ceremony, waiting for each other to start something. Nontheless, Cosmo considered it a "decently dignified occasion" spoiled only by Hubert, who was the only one actually mourning.
  • October 11, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
  • October 12, 2012
    mew4ever23
    Pretty much every funeral scene ever shown in Red Vs Blue.
  • October 12, 2012
    Astaroth
    How does this trope relate to And There Was Much Rejoicing?
  • October 12, 2012
    Bakazuki
    I would call it a Sister Trope through function. Applying both to the context of funerals...

    • And There Was Much Rejoicing -> Disrepect at a funeral through the celebration of the death of the deceased
    • A Funeral Attended By Assholes -> Disrespect at a funeral through the discussion and gossip of inappropriate topics (due to time, place, and occasion) that come up precisely because of the death or because of who they are survived by.

    ...if that's not too verbose. Or perhaps you're suggesting the similarities between the two are potentially problematic?
  • October 12, 2012
    StarSword
    Stand-Up Comedy
    • During the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, Bill Engvall offered the following "You might be a redneck" joke:
      "If you've ever opened a beer during a eulogy, you might be a redneck."
      • And after Bill finished explaining this one (it was his uncle Jack), Larry, Ron, and Jeff improv'ed the following:
        Jeff: Mama looks good, don't she? *mimes drinking*
        Ron: That ain't Mama. *drinks*
        Larry: Naw, that's her, they just shaved her beard off!
  • October 12, 2012
    StarSword
    Also, would Kuwabara yelling at Yusuke during his wake in Yu Yu Hakusho count?
  • October 12, 2012
    Bakazuki
    No, if I'm remembering that scene correctly. There was a subtle implication that he cared about Yusuke with the stuff he was yelling, right?

    Your confusion of what the boundaries of this trope are, as well as my difficulties in understanding your Blue Collar Comedy Tour example, is sending me signals that tell me that either my laconic text or the full description (or both) need a bit of revising to clarify things. Worse case scenario is where I have to go back and refine the whole thing.
  • October 13, 2012
    Lumpenprole
    In the Audrey Hepburn movie Charade, virtually the only people to attend the late Charles Lampert's funeral besides his widow are his three former partners in crime, who are more disgusted than sorry at his death.
  • October 13, 2012
    SKJAM
    Indeed, they are mainly there to check the corpse for Faking The Dead.
  • October 13, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Hm...okay, I compared the two, and it seems that my laconic description might be slightly incongruous with my main description. The examples fit so far, but I'm sensing it may eventually get cases of Square Peg Round Trope later on. Agree or disagree?
  • October 13, 2012
    DracMonster
    Doo Doo To The Dead!

    Just kidding, how about Last Disrespects? Or Paying Last Disrespects if thats clearer.

    Also, since this is a Death Trope, it will need a Spoilered Rotten warning.
  • October 13, 2012
    Reflextion
  • October 13, 2012
    m8e
  • October 13, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Cool, cool. I'll put those two along with the original title in a crowner later on if we ever reach that point.

    Alright, so here's how things have been going so far. Hopefully by the end of this, someone will understand my dilemma and help me out a little.

    My original intent for this trope was to cover scenarios where a funeral's attendees would veer their attentions away from the proceedings and the deceased, and instead focus on matters that they can freely talk about now that the person's dead and unable to voice complaints or call them out on it. Examples of said matters would be, as I cited in the main description, things like inheritance disputes, the legitimacy of the deceased's child, or who to force the care of the deceased's child on (with the implication that no one would want them). By talking about these matters at an inappropriate time, the funeral and the death has faded into the background as a result, and the attendees have paid disrespects to the deceased in an indirect fashion, especially if they chose to talk about close family members/friends they survived by. The examples that fall closest to what I was initially aiming for are the Sangatsu No Lion scenario I added and the Making Money scenario.

    The examples have started getting a little questionable after the Red Vs Blue example (Which only has minimal context, by the way. Anyone want to link me to a funeral scene?).

    The Blue Collar Comedy example does show indirect disrespect to the deceased, but through inappropriate actions, rather than inappropriate discussion (i.e. rednecks acting like rednecks). Same with the Charade example.

    With all that said, I'm somewhat at loss in regards to what direction I should take with this YKKTW. I'd like opinions on what my best course of action should be in this case before things get too problematic as the examples cumulate.

    Should I:
    • Weed out inappropriate examples and keep the function of this YKTTW within the scope of its original definition (disrespect at a funeral through either inappropriately timed discussion of worldly matters pertaining to their death or just plain inappropriate gossip and discussion involving those close to them that they survived by)?
    • Or expand the scope of this YKTTW to be inclusive of any inappropriate thing done at funerals, whether it be some form of discussion or action?
  • October 13, 2012
    TonyG
    In Bebes Kids, Robin meets Jamika at a funeral, where "everyone was there, cause everyone was glad he was gone." People are seen drinking, laughing and playing dominoes, while the only one grieving was the widow.
  • October 13, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    It has been awhile since I'd seen the movie, but in Gran Torino, the funeral of Walt Kowalski's wife had some disrespect shown from some attendees (but not most of them, so I'm not sure if this would fit with this proposed trope). One of the granddaughters was dressed fairly inappropriately and (IIRC) was fiddling around on her cell phone during the service. And I'm not sure if it was at the funeral or very shortly after (like at the reception at the Kowalski house), but Walt's kids started asking Walt if he wanted to go to a "nice retirement place" or something so they could sell the house, the same disrespectful grandchild started asking whether she could have the couch, etc. In other words, the vultures began circling immediately.
  • October 14, 2012
    tardigrade
    In Real Life, the Jolley Gang were a group of unpleasant funeral-crashers, who blagged their way into funerals on the pretext that they knew the deceased, so as to get at the free food / booze. Victoria Coren wrote a couple of scathing articles about them, after they targeted her father's funeral: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/dec/21/celebrity-victoria-coren
  • October 14, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    And of course you have Fred Phelps' congregation of kooks who go around to veterans' funerals and claim that God condemned them to die because our nation tolerates (as versus what? executing???) "fags".
  • October 14, 2012
    DracMonster
    @Bakaruki: I'd say expand it to direct or indirectly disrespectful behavior. If you keep it narrow I suspect it will suffer Trope Decay anyway, might as well go with the flow here.
  • October 14, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Yeah, I kind of feel that I might as well seeing that the amount of "disrespect through actions" examples are starting to outnumber the "disrespect through discussion" ones. Since the discussion is going a bit slow, I'll give it just one more day for people to say their piece before I go ahead and do the revisions to the description. For now, I'll just go ahead and assemble the examples we've gotten so far.
  • October 14, 2012
    Freud
    On Two and a Half Men, Charlie had a dream in which he attended his own funeral (as a ghost). At the funeral, women spat on his coffin, the eulogy was filled with derogatory jokes, and Alan ended the service by inviting the congregation back to his beach house for a wake/luau.
  • October 14, 2012
    StarSword
    Dunno if it counts but...

  • October 14, 2012
    Bakazuki
    I'll...mull on that one before adding it. If anything, I'd call that "disrespect through intentions," and I really don't want to expand this trope in yet another way.
  • October 14, 2012
    TonyG
    • In Amazon Women On The Moon, a man's funeral turns into a comedy roast.
    • From The Simpsons: When Mr. Burns is thought to be dead, various dignitaries come to his funeral just to spit in his grave. So many in fact, that the grave has to be drained afterwards.
  • October 14, 2012
    StarSword
    Add a vote for Last Disrespects.
  • October 14, 2012
    Bakazuki
    I'm starting a crowner for titles once we got everything else about this settled, so you can save your votes for then.
  • October 15, 2012
    Bakazuki
    -shrugs- A...tentative description was put in place of the outdated one a few minutes ago. It's not perfect, but it'll do for now while everything else is taken care of.

    By the way...um, who thought up of the False Funeral and Disrespect for the Dead titles? I don't remember editing those in there. Not complaining; just a little creepy to have 'em show up yet be unable to trace 'em back to who. lol
  • October 16, 2012
    DRCEQ
    • The Boondocks: Robert Freeman's longtime "friend" Moe had passed away, and the was asked to read a pre-written eulogy. At first, everyone at the funeral acted as if Moe was the best at everything. He was being given credit for things Robert did in World War II, all the women swooned for him, etc. Robert finally breaks all the lies by announcing how much of a jerk Moe really was. Everyone else then started agreeing and pointing out how he owed many of them money and other negative aspects about him.
  • October 16, 2012
    PhysicalStamina
    I like Last Disrespects.
  • October 16, 2012
    StarSword
    Film:

  • October 16, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Star Sword, I have feeling that your last two examples might be distinct enough to be their own trope (the general idea being "attending a funeral for the wrong reasons"), but I'll let Wiki Magic deal with that. For now, I've added 'em in and made a slight tweak to the description..
  • October 16, 2012
    StarSword
    I really wasn't sure about the Yu Yu Hakusho example, and I now agree it doesn't count.
  • October 16, 2012
    hevendor717
    Fuckhead Funeral? Damn, I got nothing really.
  • October 17, 2012
    DRCEQ
    Last Disrepsects works for me.
  • October 17, 2012
    Bakazuki
    ...I dunno know whether to laugh or cry. DX

    Alright, here. Crowner. You guys seem settled on fairly settled on this, but I'm doing this as a formality in case there are people who like the other titles but didn't say anything.
  • October 17, 2012
    sgamer82
    Yu Yu Hakusho does possess an example though in that scene.

    • During Yusuke's funeral at the start of Yu Yu Hakusho, while Kuwabara goes on a screaming fit about Yusuke dying, his outburst is an act of genuine mourning. In contrast, their school principal calls out some teachers who are at the funeral making snide comments both about Yusuke and Kuwabara's behavior.
  • October 17, 2012
    Unknown Troper
    The Red Vs Blue examples are all basically about people being completely disrespectful at funerals, sometimes for their own agendas, sometimes just because they're jerks. Interestingly enough, in all three cases, the "deceased" was actually still alive!

    The three funerals are episode 51, episode 83, and season 9 episode 14. In the first, Church (the "dead" guy) is the one who wants a funeral; Tucker calls it lame and wanders off. In the second, for Sarge, Grif turns it into a comedy roast of Sarge and Simmons uses the opportunity to campaign for Sarge's job. In the third, it turns out no one remembers anything about Simmons except he liked gum and talked a lot.

    The first two are probably more what you're looking for, right?
  • October 17, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Yes, thank you, Mr. IP Address (I kid). The first two are spot on, as far as the current scope of this YKTTW goes, the third one might be something else, so I'll look into it.

    I did see one of them on a clip on You Tube, but it helps to know where the others are. Now how to rewrite its example with that information to confirm to the proper standards...
  • October 17, 2012
    Alynnidalar
    I somehow wasn't logged in when I posted that! Sorry about that, it was me talking about Red vs. Blue (let's hope I'm actually logged in this time...).
  • October 17, 2012
    Darthcaliber
    a note on The Muppet Christmas Carol entry- the line "I don't mind going if a lunch is provided" is actually in the original book.
  • October 17, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Ah. Does the original line in the book play out in pretty much the same way as The Muppet Christmas Carol entry? I can't really fix that entry since I haven't read the book, nor watched that adaptation.
  • October 18, 2012
    saintdane05
  • October 18, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Ah, good...Thank you. I'll have to rewrite this a bit to clarify that this took place at the political opponent's funeral (I think we're well past the statute of limitations on this series as far spoilers go), so guys, be sure to clarify that your examples do take place in funerals if it overlaps with other existing tropes (And There Was Much Rejoicing, in this case).
  • October 18, 2012
    RoseBride
    I have another example: In The Evillious Chronicles by Mothy, one of the main characters, Elluka Clockworker attend to the funeral of and "old friend" Leonheart Avadonia, apparently just to call him an idiot, and leaves.

    Not sure if it fits in music or Literature because this isn't shown in the songs, only appears in the novels of Story of Evil
  • October 18, 2012
    Bakazuki
    I'd put it under Literature. Even though it's a supplementary work, nothing in the main body of work (i.e. the music) has an example.

    Either way, I hesitate to put this in because it lacks the necessary context that will help me determine whether this is a subversion of this trope like with Yu Yu Hakusho example involving Kuwabara's yelling, or a straight example. Namely, why did this character call the deceased an idiot?
  • October 18, 2012
    RoseBride
    The only context I can give you is that, Elluka is known to be extremelly childish, Mothy describes her persona as himself when he's drunk, and in the novels she constantly believes herself to be Surrounded by Idiots she even badmouths one particular character cause she rather stay with her friends in the middle of a war instead of escaping (because she is primal target), Leonheart and Elluka, along with another character were known as the "Three Heroes" so it is assumed they were close friends but nothing else is ever stated about that time, and after the funeral the novels make no further elaboration in the incident, altough Leonheart was murdered by his own adopted son because he was planning a revolution against the princess, also she is inmortal, by the time of the Story of evil events happens she is over 500 years old
  • October 18, 2012
    ReloadPsi
    Daria gave us an example in the episode Murder, She Snored. Although the funeral occurred in a character's dream, nobody really had anything nice to say, Ms. Barch used it as an excuse for another feminist rant, Mack's eulogy basically insulted him, and to top it off, Daria and Jane wore Hawaiian shirts for the occasion.
  • October 18, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Hm, okay. I didn't need that much, though. The funeral scene itself is enough. Like what the narration indicates, etc.

    I'll add it in for now on the grounds that whatever the case, going in to toss that word in and leaving probably wouldn't be acceptable behavior in a funeral, either way. Do said novels have an easily accessible source? I might look the example up for myself sometime to check.
  • October 19, 2012
    RoseBride
    Mmm...the novels are available in Amazon, only in japanese tough, there are some translation on blogs and Tumblr, but that's pretty much it. Also I just remember another two examples:

    In the Simpsons episode "Homer's Enemy", after Grimes dies, at his funeral Homer has fallen aspleep, and snoring loudly, when he says (still asleep) "Marge, change the channel" Lenny exclaims "That's our Homer!" everyone, even Lovejoy is laughing.

    In Titus funerals never seemed to be to due respect to the decesed or its family, one episode has Titus and Erin wanting to marry in the same instant when the priest is showing them the church, wihtout their families, the fact that there is a funeral due to that same afternoon does not bother Erin, who limites herself to close the coffin and take the flower arrangement in the top of it as her bouquet and at the stunned priest saying: "He'll Wait"

    Also from Titus, there was an episode where the main character attends the funeral of an ex, the gang (and Erin) founds out, Hilarity Ensues as Tommy feels offended that no one in the family seems to remember him, Dave starts hooks up with some girl, and Titus ends up ranting at his ex's coffin because turns out she was abusive towards him.
  • October 19, 2012
    Bakazuki
    New problem I found while looking up one of Rose Bride's examples. See the Current Issues list in the Draft Description, if you don't look at the thing regularly. Simply put, the potential overlap with The Fun In Funeral might prove to be problematic. Since this is a rather big issue, I'm removing a hat.
  • October 19, 2012
    RoseBride
    Seems more like they can overlap, but The Funin Funeral is meant to make fun of the ridiculous situations that can take place at the service, which may or may not include the deceased or the death itself, while this YKTTW, is specifically about behaving rudely at the funeral, disrespecting the family, the deceased, or downplaying the situation (something like "Oh, he/she's dead, big deal") Also I found that many of the examples of the Fun in Funeral are more fit to this. This trope may be fitting for Sister Trope of The Fun in Funeral, because whereas this would be about ... disprespecting what it should be a solemn event, by being outright rude, noncaring, or being a jerkass, the second is about general wackiness that take place in such event, mostly by circunstances out of the control of the characthers or as consecuencies of their idiocy.
  • October 19, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Hm...yeah, Sister Trope might be it. I was also thinking I might have accidentally created the Super Trope to it by expanding the scope's definition too much and just accepting almost every example that was posted here. I think I got...lost, per se, because a lot of humorous examples started coming in here and started to blur the distinction a little bit.

    Any other opinions? I can't just go by one person's opinion like I did last time. A problem this critical needs several.

    And guess this means I have to take a second look at every example. Gonna take a little time since I haven't watched everything here, but...

    Oh, and should it come to the point where we might have to sort examples between this YKTTW entry and The Fun In Funeral, would that necessitate a visit to the Trope Repair Shop?
  • October 20, 2012
    Bakazuki
    Added in a section defining the relationship between this and The Fun In Funeral based on the distinction made by RoseBride.

    The only example that's already in the draft that I really question is the one for Amazon Women On The Moon, since neither the example text here nor the example text in The Fun In Funeral clarify the intent behind the roast (i.e. for spite? as a coping mechanism?).
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=f7vjnkb3cdrkxc126tarv5qh&trope=LastDisrespects