Created By: DennisDunjinman on July 20, 2012 Last Edited By: DennisDunjinman on November 29, 2013
Troped

It Kind Of Looks Like A Face

The resemblance this faceless thing has to a person's face is uncanny!

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
A typically faceless object is found that inexplicably resembles the face of another person, usually a historical figure. Sometimes the one possessing the object may believe for a moment that the historical figure that the item represents is talking to them. The visage may also represent a religious figure, such as Jesus, and will be believed to be a holy sign from above.

There is a grain of Truth in Television to this trope: Psychologists are certain that the human brain is hard-wired to recognize faces. This condition is called pareidolia. This tendency is so strong, it leads people to perceive "faces" in totally random things such as the pattern of browning on a piece of toast or the weathering of a rock, or strange shapes in the clouds, even though they're nothing more than optical illusions.

This trope is in effect only when the object doesn't intentionally look like a face (or is, but isn't supposed to be recognized as such), but people swear it does. Weathering on a rock counts, but not a statue, a carved coin, or Rushmore Refacement. Seeing a face in a potato, burnt toast or cornchip counts, but not a miniature gummi of the Venus De Milo.

Compare the Inkblot Test, where a patient is judged by what they may see in incoherent stains. Contrast The Blank, when someone who should have a face doesn't have one, and Rushmore Refacement, where someone commits an act of graffiti by carving their own face in the side of a mountain.


Art
  • There are plenty of optical illusions that take advantage of this.
    • One can show either an old woman or a young one depending on how interprets the features.
    • The Rubin Vase, which depending on how one looks at it can either show a single vase or two faces.
  • The paintings of Giuseppe Arcimboldo show portraits of people made entirely out of fruits and vegetables.

Comic Books
  • In Creature Tech, the local tourist trap owner claims to have a cinnamon roll bearing the image of Jesus. Dr. Ong thinks it looks more like John Lennon.

Film
  • In the Cars films the landscapes have car-shaped formations in keeping with this trope as aplied to a world populated by sentient cars. The same concept applies in Planes, but with airplanes instead.
  • Exploited in Chronicle, where Andrew uses his telekinesis to create a visage of the Virgin Mary in his pancake syrup to freak out a passing waitress.

Literature
  • A Running Gag in The Truth involves a man who keeps bringing vegetables from his garden that resemble human faces (and sometimes other body parts) in to the newspaper in the hope that they will find it newsworthy and perhaps print a picture.

Live-Action TV
  • A guest on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson was a woman who worked at a potato chip factory. She collected potato chips which looked like famous people. At one point while showing her collection, she turned away from Johnny and he took a big crunch; but it was from a bowl of chips he had stashed behind his desk.
  • Bones: A Victim of the Week is found in a bale of recycled cardboard. The staining of her blood makes some of the workers who find the bale think it's a vision of the Virgin Mary.
  • Johnny Bago: Johnny's RV is taken for a religious shrine because a dirt mark on the front looks like Jesus.
  • This was a Running Gag with resident weirdo Cliff on Cheers for a while. He grows a potato that he thinks looks just like Richard Nixon ("The Groom Wore Clearasil"), a turnip that looks like June Lockhart and a squash that looks like the Hawaiian Islands ("Don Juan Is Hell"), and another squash that looks like George Shultz ("Cheers: The Motion Picture").
  • Glee: Finn's subplot in the aptly-named episode "Grilled Cheesus" is kickstarted when he thinks he sees Jesus on his grilled cheese sandwich.
  • An episode of Full House involves a partially peeled potato that looks like Joe Pesci.
  • Saving Grace has a couple of episodes featuring "Holy Cow": A bovine with mottles that many characters swear look like the face of Christ.

Newspaper Comics
  • A story arc in Dilbert featured the cynical Wally deliberately creating - and nurturing - a coffee stain in the cafeteria that looks like the face of Jesus to exploit the credulous. He is seen adding to it with judicious drips and drizzles...

Web Comics
  • In Homestuck, Jade tries out her Pictionary Modus (which creates an item based on what it thinks her drawing is) by drawing a casual, loopy doodle. The Modus interprets it as being the face of actor Charles Dutton. This becomes a Running Gag.

Web Original

Western Animation
  • The Simpsons:
    • A newspaper article features a squirrel resembling Abraham Lincoln.
    • A bunch of beans are said to resemble The Leader, a stand-in for Jesus.
  • An episode of WordGirl has Becky seeking a pinecone resembling Lincoln as part of a scavenger hunt she's participating in.
  • In Recess, T.J. is granted a corn chip in the shape of Lincoln's head for a perceived act of heroism due to his shiner. He hallucinates that the chip is talking to him and Honest Abe is saying he should tell the truth about how he got his black eye.
  • The characters in The Weekenders go to a museum every week to sample ethnic foods. One time when sampling Andean potatoes, one of them found a potato that resembled their friend Lor. Lor didn't see the resemblance, but took offense when the potato was eaten.

Real Life
  • Jesus's Face has been reported found in toasted bread.
  • The Face of Mars, which Viking I took pictures of in the 1970s, turns out to be just a mountain with some shadows. This didn't stop rampant speculation about a humanoid civilization that may have lived on Mars.
  • The Old Man of the Mountain was a famous New Hampshire rock formation that resembled a human face in profile, when viewed from the north. The formation, which was famous enough to go on the New Hampshire state quarter, collapsed in 2003.
  • The Man in the Moon, as well as the Moon Rabbit.
Community Feedback Replies: 89
  • July 23, 2012
    aurora369
    Right now I can only recall one example: the squirrel resembling Lincoln from The Simpsons.
  • July 23, 2012
    NimmerStill
    Well if it's only *usually* Lincoln, and while on the subject of The Simpsons, there are the beans resembling "The Leader" according to Homer ("leader beans") in "The Joy of Sect".
  • July 23, 2012
    animeg3282
    and sometimes the item resembles Jesus.
  • July 23, 2012
    DragonQuestZ
    I suggest a person neutral name, to avoid looking too narrow.
  • July 23, 2012
    naruhinaluver15
    There was an episode of Glee, called Grilled Cheesus, where Finn made a grilled cheese sandwich that had burn marks that looked like Jesus Christ.
  • July 23, 2012
    randomsurfer
    A "real life" guest on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson was a woman who worked at a potato chip factory and collected potato chips which looked like famous people. At one point while showing her collection, she turned away from Johnny and he took a a big crunch; but it was from a bowl of chips he had stashed behind his desk.
  • July 24, 2012
    NimmerStill
    @Sponsor, the "leader" in the Simpsons is more of a stand-in for modern-day cult leaders like the Heaven's Gate guy than he is for Jesus.
  • October 12, 2013
    MetaFour
    • In Creature Tech, the local tourist trap owner claims to have a cinnamon roll bearing the image of Jesus. Dr. Ong thinks it looks more like John Lennon.
  • October 12, 2013
    Melkior
    Real Life:
    • Psychologists are certain that the human brain is hard-wired to recognise faces. This tendency is so strong, it leads people to see "faces" in totally random things such as the pattern of browning on a piece of toast or the weathering of a rock.
  • October 14, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Western Animation
    • The first episode of Filmation's Lassie's Rescue Rangers had The Spirit of Thunder Mountain which strongly resembled a human face in profile.
  • October 15, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Namespaced an example.
  • October 15, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    you mean like this? example exaggerated for clarity.

    jesus face tends to crop up on trees, food, wall stains, dog anuses etc.

  • October 15, 2013
    randomsurfer
    I don't think Mount Rushmore counts, since the presidents' faces were carved in to the granite on purpose.

    TV
    • Bones: A Victim Of The Week is found in a bale of recycled cardboard. The staining of her blood makes some of the workers who find the bale think it's a vision of the Virgin Mary.
    • Johnny Bago: Johnny's RV is taken for a religous shrine because a dirt mark on the front looks like Jesus.
    Real Life
    • The Face of Mars, which Viking I took pictures of in the 1970s, turns out to be just a mountain with some shadows.
  • October 17, 2013
    gallium
    Live-Action TV
    • This was a Running Gag with resident weirdo Cliff on Cheers for a while. He grows a potato that he thinks looks just like Richard Nixon ("The Groom Wore Clearasil"), a turnip that looks like June Lockhart and a squash that looks like the Hawaiian Islands ("Don Juan Is Hell"), and another squash that looks like George Shultz ("Cheers: The Motion Picture").
  • October 17, 2013
    Karalora
    Literature:
    • A Running Gag in The Truth involves a man who keeps bringing vegetables from his garden that resemble human faces (and sometimes other body parts) in to the newspaper in the hope that they will find it newsworthy and perhaps print a picture.
  • October 18, 2013
    TonyG
    In the Cars films the landscapes have car-shaped formations in keeping with this trope as aplied to a world populated by sentient cars. The same concept applies in Planes, but with airplanes instead.
  • October 18, 2013
    AgProv
    Newspaper Comics There is a story arc in Dilbert where the cynical Wally deliberately creates - and nurtures - a coffee stain in the cafeteria that looks like the face of Jesus, and then exploits the credulous. He is seen adding to it with judicious drips and drizzles...
  • October 20, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Seconding what randomsurfer (^x5) said. There's nothing "inexplicable" in that Mount Rushmore looks like a series of human faces.
  • October 20, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Can we call that an Invoked Trope then?
  • October 21, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Do we have a trope about carving faces on a mountain (or similar landmarks)? In Naruto, in Konoha Village, there's a big mountain with all of the Hokage's faces carved on it, like Mount Rushmore.
  • October 22, 2013
    Synchronicity
  • October 25, 2013
    robinjohnson
    If it's going to be a what-it-says-on-the-tin title, can it be Looks Like A Face instead? It's shorter, and plain English.
  • October 25, 2013
    gallium
    Carving faces on a mountain is sculpting. It's just sculpting with very big rocks. It is not this trope, which is about items in nature accidentally resembling Real Life humans. The Mount Rushmore example needs to be deleted.

    Looks Like A Face is a good name.

    ^^^Carving big faces in a mountain could certainly be a trope—not this one, but a different one. Maybe a trope involving large, grand monuments of any sort. Giant statues and the like.
  • October 25, 2013
    gallium
    But here's another genuine real life example.

    Real Life
    • The Old Man of the Mountain was a famous New Hampshire rock formation that resembled a human face in profile, when viewed from the north. The formation, which was famous enough to go on the New Hampshire state quarter, collapsed in 2003.
  • October 25, 2013
    pinkdalek
    • In Homestuck, Jade tries out her Pictionary Modus (which creates an item based on what it thinks her drawing is) by drawing a casual, loopy doodle. The Modus interprets it as being the face of actor Charles Dutton. This becomes a Running Gag.
  • October 25, 2013
    OREOSTUFFER
    In Real Life, there's a mountain in New England called "The Old Man of the Mountain". Also, in the southern Appalachian mountains: "Grandfather Mountain".
  • October 25, 2013
    MetaFour
    Web Original:
  • October 27, 2013
    Chabal2
    It's called pareidolia.
    • A common interpretation for the myth that trolls turn to stone in daylight is that rock formations looking vaguely like giant humans were believed to be trolls.

  • November 6, 2013
    Larkmarn
    Looks Like A Face sounds better than any of the titles I've seen so far.

    ... that said, I still think Jesus On A Cracker is clear enough.
  • November 6, 2013
    Generality
    ^ Finding Jesus' face on things has to be a separate subtrope. There are just too many examples.

    The heike crab is a crab native to Japan which is said to have the face of a scowling samurai on its back. There's an explanation in folklore. Carl Sagan showcased the crab in Cosmos as an example of artificial selection: the theory is that ancestors of the crab which happened to be face-like were superstitiously avoided by fishers, creating a selective pressure that developed this trait over time.
  • November 6, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Looks Like A Face doesn't sound specific enough to me.

    Jesus On A Cracker reminds me of the complaint issued by the first title I suggested, Item Resembling Abraham Lincoln. It's too specific.
  • November 6, 2013
    DAN004
    Title could be confused for uncanny facial resemblance some person have to another. And it shouldn't be specific for something resembling someone's face IRL. Just something that have a human face is enough.

    Face On A Faceless Thing was clear, and its previous title (Item Resembling Human Visage) was even clearer.
  • November 6, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ^ What he said. how did the current name even pass? o_O

    ^^ Jesus On A Cracker is good. though can easily be misread as Jesus On Crack, which is pretty amusing.

    @Generality, I'm starting to agree onjesus face as separate. maybe just an Internal Subtrope though. seems rarely used in universe but widely seen in real life.
  • November 8, 2013
    troacctid
    Item Resembling Human Visage is literally a Spock Speak translation of Looks Like A Face. It's more awkward without being any more clear.
  • November 8, 2013
    robinjohnson
    ^ This, hard. It's also a slap in the face to non-native English speakers.

    I do like Jesus On A Cracker, though: it's actually got more information to it, since it suggests this would apply to the Face on Mars, but not to Mount Rushmore.
  • November 8, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Well, this trope can only have ONE title, and I don't know who's responsible for picking the right one. The trouble with Looks Like A Face is that it lacks a subject. What looks like a face?

    Doesn't TV Tropes come in multiple languages anyway?
  • November 8, 2013
    robinjohnson
    "Item" doesn't give it a subject though, either (what item?), and "resembling human visage" is just terrible, terrible English. Seriously, if it's a choice between those two, Looks Like A Face isn't just better, it's the only acceptable one.

    Also, there's no real reason to exclude faces that aren't human, as some of the examples aren't. It's a common pitfall of Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness to end up accidentally changing the meaning of what you're saying for the sake of a few more syllables, as well as making it unreadable.
  • November 8, 2013
    troacctid
    All translated pages are written and maintained manually on a volunteer basis, so unless someone generous shows up to translate a trope, it will be English-only.
  • November 8, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
  • November 8, 2013
    randomsurfer
    I vote strongly for Looks Like A Face. It can slip into an example easily: i.e., The Man In The Moon Looks Like A Face.

    See also That Cloud Looks Like.
  • November 8, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Seconding Looks Like A Face.
  • November 8, 2013
    DAN004
  • November 8, 2013
    hevendor717
    An episode of Full House involves a partially peeled potato that looks like Joe Pesci.
  • November 10, 2013
    robinjohnson
    Face In An Unexpected Place doesn't convey that it's a thing that looks like a face. It sounds like it would apply when someone got their face stuck in some railings, for example.
  • November 11, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ You're thinking too far, son.
  • November 11, 2013
    gallium
    Casting another vote for Looks Like A Face, which seems like the obvious choice.
  • November 11, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Is getting one's face stuck in some railings a trope?
  • November 12, 2013
    ShiningwingX
    Saving Grace has a couple of episodes featuring "Holy Cow": A bovine with mottles that many characters swear look like the face of Christ.
  • November 12, 2013
    troacctid
    Face In An Unexpected Place is too long and clunky. Dislike.
  • November 15, 2013
    Synchronicity
    Looks Like A Face gets my vote. I would hat this if not for the name.
  • November 15, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    I suppose the trope's been named by committee. I personally don't like it, but mihi.
  • November 15, 2013
    DAN004
    Committee who?
  • November 18, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Popular vote.
  • November 19, 2013
    SinusPi
    As much as I hate to be the naysayer, I find this People Sit On Chairs-ish. Pareidolia is a known phenomenon, there's nothing specifically tropeworthy about it. We don't trope "afraid of heights" to group all acrophobiacs, do we? To me, it would be tropable if something MORE happened, save for just "something looking like a face" - it coming to life, being actually mistaken for the person, not resembling anything at all and yet a character swears it's a dead likeness, etc...
  • November 21, 2013
    DAN004
    The trope is how pareidolia is exaggerated in fiction.
  • November 21, 2013
    Synchronicity
    ^^Actually we have Why Did It Have To Be Snakes etc. This is about how it's portrayed in fiction and in exaggerated cases (like the man in the moon, etc). Besides, people freaking out about the Virgin Mary in pancake syrup has to be worth something.

    Also, maybe Pareidolia should be a redirect...? Or no?
  • November 21, 2013
    SinusPi
    ^ Maybe the description should be clearer about how it needs to be exaggerated to fit this. Kinda like the example I suggested ("not resembling anything at all and yet a character swears it's a dead likeness"). "The man on the moon" is a common cultural element, almost all Earth's cultures see a face or something in the pattern of craters.

    Note that Why Did It Have To Be Snakes is not merely about a character's phobia - it's about abusing that phobia for comedic/dramatic effect: once we know a character has that flaw, it's guaranteed to be used and abused. For the love of me, I don't see any dramatic effect in face likenesses...

    If this was about pareidolia actually being RIGHT -
    • (Alice) Look, my toast looks like a face!
    • (Bob) And an ass-ugly one, too!
    • (Toast) Your mom is ass-ugly.
    - THEN it would very much be a trope.

  • November 21, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ I think the toast doesn't have to say anything, but you have a point.
  • November 22, 2013
    SinusPi
    ^ My point was mainly to show an example of exaggerated pareidolia (as you yourself said 4 posts above): it doesn't just look like a face, it IS a face, it even talks back.

    I think I have a yet more refined version of this point. Pareidolia isn't a trope, it's a THEME, a PLOT KEYWORD. Just like "terrorism" isn't a trope, while Terrorists Without A Cause is.

    We need very specific FLAVORS of pareidolia here, if it's to be a trope. Pareidolia being wrong. Pareidolia being right. Pareidolia being ridiculous.
  • November 22, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    This was a trope about finding objects with inexplicable resemblance to specific people. It's warped a lot in the trope building process.
  • November 22, 2013
    DAN004
    "Pareidolia being ridiculous."

    THAT'S IT.
  • November 22, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    This trope's been in the building long enough. Am I getting hats or what?
  • November 23, 2013
    SinusPi
    ^DennisDunjinman: Patience, young Padawan. Trope wasn't built in a day, you know.

    ^^DAN004: Ridiculous in what way? People swearing there's a face when there's nothing there really, just a jumble of spots (plotwise, intentionally not resembling a face at all)? Or the other way round, a completely dead likeness appearing, not just vaguely similar, but a totally striking image (practically impossible outside of fiction)?

  • November 23, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Can be either.
  • November 23, 2013
    gallium
    ^^^I'll give you a hat. The trope looks clearly defined, examples are sorted, etc.
  • November 25, 2013
    XFllo
    I'm one of those who think this trope needs more of an angle. It's on a good way, but I don't think it's hattable (i.e. launchable ) at this point.
  • November 25, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    What more needs to be said? It's about an object, natural landmark or (supposedly) unintentional picture that uncannily resembles a person or part of a person, without deliberately making it that way on their part.
  • November 25, 2013
    SinusPi
    If I may suggest a few directions.

    1. No pareidolia necessary. A face spontaneously appears on something. It's not an illusion, the face just IS THERE, and bonus points if it's a proper historical figure or a known character. Almost impossible to happen in Real Life, unless you're using one of those novelty toasters.
    2. Dude, there's nothing there! Pareidolia debunked by popular vote. A character swears they're seeing a face, and gets ridiculed for it. Might lead to:
    3. IT IS a face. Doesn't just look like it. The stone face that characters wondered about actually opens its mouth and speaks, the Virgin Mary coffee spot winks at the camera right before fade out, the burnt toast bites someone's fingers.

    Pick yer poison, or brew yer own!
  • November 25, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    The object doesn't intentionally look like a face (or is, but isn't supposed to be recognized as such), but people swear it does. It's all in the mind, you know.

    So weathering on a rock counts, but not Rushmore Refacement. Seeing a face in a potato, burnt toast or cornchip counts, but not a miniature gummi of the Venus De Milo. And so on.
  • November 25, 2013
    Ryusui
    I'm fairly certain that the archetypical version of this would be something like Jesus On A Sandwich (or Virgin Mary On A Sandwich). The problem with Looks Like A Face is that it's begging to be misused; the point is, as noted above, is that something is said (or explicitly shown) to resemble someone's face, and there's no obvious reason (apart from implications of divine intervention) that this should be so. It could be pure pareidolia on the part of the characters or it could be blatantly obvious to the audience, but the point is, no one deliberately made it that way.

    Well aware my suggestions are probably too specific to work as a good trope name, but they're a better place to start than what we've got.
  • November 25, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    • resolved sigh*

    I'm getting mixed messages here, but while this is indeed a potentially good trope I can't launch it until everyone is happy. Or at least five of them.

  • November 25, 2013
    SinusPi
    ^ What you're describing, Dennis, is simple pareidolia. It's not a fiction mechanism, it's a perfectly normal aspect of human minds. You could as well try to trope paranoia or trauma. As such, it's People Sit On Chairs: it's a fact, not a trope. To be a trope, it needs to have a specific literary twist to it - like one of those posted above. Try to look at it from the point of "what does it MEAN to the story?", not "what happens?". So your characters see a face-on-toast - what then? Is there a common pattern to these occurrences?
  • November 25, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Compare the That Cloud Looks Like and Inkblot Test tropes. They're about seeing things that aren't really there in shapeless things that resemble them.
  • November 25, 2013
    DAN004
  • November 25, 2013
    SinusPi
    ^^ Dennis, those are often plot devices, not mere elements. Clouds and inkblots are drawn to look like certain things to be Played For Laughs or to give characters an Eureka Moment; they're not merely "characters are looking at clouds and imagining things" and "someone sees something in an inkblot".
  • November 25, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    This trope also ranges from "plot device" to "one-off gag".
  • November 26, 2013
    XFllo
    I have one suggestion: Jesus's face really seems to be prominent and used in fiction a lot, usually to make fun of religious people. I think there was a variation in The Simpsons when Reverend Lovejoy wanted to get rid of Ned Flanders, so he told him there was an oil spot resembling a saint in the parking lot.
  • November 26, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    But Jesus isn't the only example. I started this trope looking for things resembling Abraham Lincoln, and both figures are covered by the same trope.
  • November 26, 2013
    XFllo
    I meant it as a sub-trope of sorts. That's the part that's trope-able. A random face seems... too random and general.

    Does Abraham Lincoln's face have any pattern? Like being enthusiastically patriotic?
  • November 26, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    In the Word Girl example it was just an unusual thing Becky was supposed to find in a scavenger hunt, with Exact Words that the pine cone she had to find also had to resemble Lincoln.

    In the Recess example, the Lincoln corn chip acts as a conscience to T.J. and tells him to be honest about how he got his black eye, and that he's not really a hero or any of the exaggerated legends that the playground kids made up about him and honored him for.

    Both examples are different, but they have an inanimate object that uncannily resembles a person in common.
  • November 27, 2013
    DAN004
    Didn't I say already that "pareidolia being egregious" is what makes it tropable?
  • November 27, 2013
    SinusPi
    You did. But what exactly would make it preposterous? Some examples or a more specific description would be needed.
  • November 27, 2013
    gallium
    "The Pareidolia Trope With No Name"

    My God, that is just the worst name I've ever seen, outside of all the Japanese trope names. Can I take my hat back, until the trope name is changed back to Looks Like A Face?

    @Dennis Dujbman, if That Cloud Looks Like and Inkblot Test are tropes, then this is a trope. I would not worry too much about that if I were you. But that name, wow, this current name is terrible. Hope it's just a placeholder. As for the idea to mention Jesus in the trope name, as noted above, this trope isn't specifically about Jesus, and if you put Jesus in the trope name it's going to mislead people.
  • November 27, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ It IS a placeholder...
  • November 27, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    It's a placeholder until I can get a consensus. If no one can agree on a name, then this trope doesn't get a name.
  • November 27, 2013
    gallium
    Well you've got to go with something, and the name you have is hideously awful. Looks Like A Face is straightforward, logical, and if this comment thread is any indication is getting more support than any alternative.
  • November 27, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    It's gotten support, but it's also gotten complaints for not being clear enough, and a good trope name needs to be unanimous or reasonably close.

    I'm pretty disappointed that this trope got four hats and then got shot back down to none.
  • November 27, 2013
    gallium
    Should have gone ahead and published at four hats!

    Change it back to Looks Like A Face and I'll give it a hat again.
  • November 29, 2013
    SinusPi
    Oh. So you got no hats, but launched anyway..? Dude...
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=ea8hfsnkrmmmqml3fdubrxx2