Created By: MisterKerr on April 19, 2013 Last Edited By: MisterKerr on April 29, 2013

Multiple Checkers Jump Win

Somebody wins at checkers by unexpectedly jumping multiple pieces in one turn

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Trope
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Alice and Bob are playing checkers. Bob is sure he will win; after all, he still has a lot of pieces left and Alice is almost out. But what's this? Suddenly Alice jumps six of Bob's pieces in one turn, ending her turn by saying, "King me!" or alternatively, "I win!" Bob is flabbergasted!

Often Alice is someone younger, more innocent, and/or dumber than Bob, while Bob is usually somewhat of a braggart that needs to be taken down a peg. May not immediately result in a win for Alice, but Bob is definitely going to lose eventually.

Compare Surprise Checkmate.

Examples:

Animated Films

  • In The Rescuers Down Under, Jake the kangaroo mouse and Sparky the fly are playing checkers. Sparky uses one piece to jump most of Jake's and land at the end of the board. Sparky can't talk, but Jake mutters "Wise fly" and kings the piece.

Live-Action TV

  • Variation in the Teaser of the Firefly episode "The Train Job". Mal and Zoe are passing the time waiting for a contact on a job by playing Chinese checkers, with Jayne looking on.
    Mal makes a move involving a couple of jumps.
    Zoe: That's a bold move.
    Mal: I live on the edge.
    Zoe makes a move with eight jumps and lands in Mal's goal.
    Jayne: Nice work, dumbass.
    Mal: I've given some thought to moving off the edge. Not an ideal location. Maybe get a spot in the middle.

Newspaper Comics

  • In a Calvin and Hobbes strip dated Sunday 25 January 1987, Hobbes makes three consecutive jumps, which triggers Calvin to Rage Quit.

Western Animation

  • In an episode of Arthur, Arthur is explaining why he's such a good brother to D.W. because he teaches her things like Checkers. D.W. immediately jumps three of his pieces and shouts, "King me!" much to Arthur's disbelief.
    • Arthur seems to like this trope, as the Brain wins in a later episode the same way.
  • Jonny Quest episode "Attack of the Tree People". Dr. Quest and Race Bannon are playing chess while Jonny and Hadji are playing checkers.
Race: Doctor, I think you've got me cornered.
Jonny: Looks like I've got you cornered too, Hadji.
Hadji: I don't think so! [Picks up a king and makes four jumps, taking four of Jonny's pieces]
Jonny: Hey, I didn't see that!
Hadji: But I did.
Community Feedback Replies: 12
  • April 19, 2013
    Chabal2
    Hobbes wins this way once.
  • April 19, 2013
    Arivne
    Western Animation
    • Jonny Quest episode "Attack of the Tree People". Dr. Quest and Race Bannon are playing chess while Jonny and Hadji are playing checkers.
    Race: Doctor, I think you've got me cornered.
    Jonny: Looks like I've got you cornered too, Hadji.
    Hadji: I don't think so! [Picks up a king and makes four jumps, taking four of Jonny's pieces]
    Jonny: Hey, I didn't see that!
    Hadji: But I did.
  • April 20, 2013
    StarSword
    TV:
    • Variation in the Teaser of the Firefly episode "The Train Job". Mal and Zoe are passing the time waiting for a contact on a job by playing Chinese checkers, with Jayne looking on.
      Mal makes a move involving a couple of jumps.
      Zoe: That's a bold move.
      Mal: I live on the edge.
      Zoe makes a move with eight jumps and lands in Mal's goal.
      Jayne: Nice work, dumbass.
      Mal: I've given some thought to moving off the edge. Not an ideal location. Maybe get a spot in the middle.
  • April 20, 2013
    StarSword
    @Chabal2: That's really close to a Zero Context Example. Can you expand it any?
  • April 20, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    Most of these I've seen involve a player jumping six pieces in one turn. But the only way that move is legal is if the piece doing the jumping is already a King in the first place because it requires backtracking, so they can't end the move saying "King me".

    I've Seen It A Million Times, but can't think of any specific examples just yet.
  • April 20, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    Animated Films
    • In The Rescuers Down Under, Jake the kangaroo mouse and Sparky the fly are playing checkers. Sparky uses one piece to jump most of Jake's and land at the end of the board. Sparky can't talk, but Jake mutters "Wise fly" and kings the piece.
  • April 20, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    The Calvin And Hobbes example comes from Sunday 25 January 1987. Hobbes makes three consecutive jumps, which triggers Calvin to Rage Quit.

    In theory, one could make nine jumps in one turn using a king, but that would require deliberate planning by both sides.
  • April 20, 2013
    lexicon
    How is this different from Surprise Checkmate?
  • April 20, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    ...because chess is a different game that does not involve jumping over other pieces to capture or advance, or combinations of moves in the same turn?
  • April 20, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Chess is more iconic than checkers.

    BTW, the traditional rules for checkers in fact require you to capture an enemy piece if it is possible to do so. Some variations (namely international) even require that if you can make multiple capturing jumps, you must choose the one that captures the most enemy pieces.

    So I don't think this is as much of a trope as OP thought, however maybe we have a Missing Supertrope somewhere in the neighborhood for an onlooker to suddenly make a Eureka Move that decides the winner.
  • April 20, 2013
    StarSword
    ^Checkers itself isn't the trope. The trope as I see it is "player 1 makes the move they think is good, player 2 takes off of it and makes a much better one."

    I foresee this being broadened.
  • April 20, 2013
    MisterKerr
    I meant this trope as having specifically to do with someone making a lot of jumps in a checkers game, which is usually unforeseen by the unlucky individual on the receiving end. I think this happens enough in media to make it its own trope. The Firefly example works because it's still checkers and involves multiple jumps, but "player 1 makes the move they think is good, player 2 takes off of it and makes a much better one" would be a different trope (though the two could overlap), as we don't necessarily have to see the move player 1 did before player 2 jumps a lot of pieces. Perhaps the description should be clarified?
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=d4zrmya0uqkqnhnd1wmb35mv