Created By: Ryuuma on August 7, 2011 Last Edited By: Arivne on April 6, 2016

The Vulgar Accent

A vulgar character use a Real Life accent/dialect considered vulgar or rude.

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Needs More Examples Up for Grabs Is This Tropeable

Each language has many dialects, accents and variations, and usually there's always one that's stereotypically associated with vulgar/rude persons, usually from the countryside. Depending on how well this is managed, it can make a character more effective or funny, or in case of dubs and translations being Woolseyism, but if exagerrated it may lead to cases of Unfortunate Implication towards speakers of said dialects.

See also The Idiot from Osaka.

NOTE THIS

The idea behind this trope is to get as many examples as possibles from many languages. The idea is to sort the examples by language. Sadly, my knowledge of foreign/english dialects and/or accents is quite limited, so please, I'm looking for help from foreign tropers to fill in those examples. For now, I'm only able to fill the Italian section. Any help is welcome.

England

In the UK, Northern English (itself not a single accent, but rather a geographical 'cluster' of dialects) is often used for this in works made in the South. That said, where most of the characters are from the North, Southern accents are often used. The Cockney accent can also be used this way.

  • A classic Cockney example is Eliza Dolittle's initial accent in Pygmalion and the musical adaptation My Fair Lady. Professor Higgins points out her vulgarity and low social status early on; the rest of the story revolves around her not only altering her speech but proving her worth despite her origins.
  • Yangus and all the people from Pickham from Dragon Quest VIII speaks with a particular accent. The sorcerer Dominico speaks with a Birmingham accent.
  • The "Asian" merchant from King's Quest II (Fan Remake) slips into Cockney accent sometimes. A talking pumpkin from the same game swings between Cockney and Brooklyn accent (see below).
  • Monty Python: the "Army Protection Racket" sketch features a pair of maifa types trying to extort money from the army who have cockney-esque accents.
  • Warhammer 40K: the Orks use Cockney accents.
  • Resident Evil 4: the mysterious merchant Talks Like A Pirate for some reason.

America

As an American example there's the Appalachian accent, also known as "Hillbilly" or "Hick" accent, which is less refined than Dixie or Yat. Cajun accents also have this connotation. As for the North, there's the various New York accents, especially Bronx and Brooklyn, and the "Jersey" accent. The last three have some Italian influence considering the huge numbers of Italian immigrants that settled there.

  • Bugs Bunny is an example of Brooklyn dialect.
  • The 4Kids dub of One Piece gave Sanji a nasal Brooklyn accent. Considering that in the original dub he often says the word "Kuso" (shit), it fits the "vulgar" part.
  • Itsuki from Devil Kings (Or Sengoku Basara, as you prefer) was given a "Hillbilly" accent.

Japan:

Usually Kansai dialect, See The Idiot from Osaka.

Italy

Generally speaking, southern dialects are often used for this job. Another popular choice is the roman dialect ("Romanaccio") who's associated with vulgar people. Other used accents are Campanian (Naples), Sicilian and sometimes Sardinian.

Examples:

  • In One Piece (manga only) the character Duval speaks with Kansai accent when he's angry. In the Italian manga he speaks with Rome accent. Meanwhile in the anime, the pirate Capone Gang Bege, who has a Mafia theme, speaks with a Sicilian accent.
  • In The Simpsons Groundskeeper Willy speaks with a Sardinian accent. In the episode where they visit Scotland said accent is extended to everyone. Furthermore the Australians in Bart vs Australia have a southern accent. Needless to say, the local mafia has a Sicilian accent.
  • In Dragonquest IX the people from Wormwood Creeck display the Rome accent in both dialogues and writings. Also the machinist of the Starlight Express Sterling use the same accent.
  • In one episode of NCIS a mafious family is involved. They all speak with extremely heavy napolitan accents.

Others

  • If the work is Russian, the character will speak either mat (the dialect made of Cluster F-Bomb) or fenya (The Mafiya's thieves' cant), or a mix of both.
  • In Sweden, they usually use the accent people in the southernmost region of Sweden speak: Scanian.
  • In Australia "broad accents" are used by less culturated characters.
  • In Mexico, the "Norteño"(northern) accent is often used in a similar that the US uses the Hick accent, there's also the "chilango" accent wich is used to denote somebody is from a "popular"(read, poor) street, that is low on the social class
  • In Bollywood movies, Bombay/Mumbai accent is used by characters to either appear dangerous or cool. Delhi/Punjabi accent is used by characters to appear cute.

Community Feedback Replies: 49
  • August 7, 2011
    Ryuuma
    As you can see this currently needs a lot of extra work. Any edit adding information is extremely welcome. Thanks.
  • August 7, 2011
    halfmillennium
    I can't say I have any knowledge of Italian language media, but this probably wouldn't be simple to do with English-speaking countries.

    In the UK, Northern English (itself not a single accent, but rather a geographical 'cluster' of dialects) is often used for this in works made in the South. That said, where most of the characters are from the North, Southern accents are often used.
  • August 7, 2011
    ladygem
    As an American example there's the Appalachian accent, also known as "Hillbilly" or "Hick" accent, which is less refined than Dixie or Yat. Cajun accents also have this connotation. As for the North, there's the various New York accents, especially Bronx and Brooklyn, and the "Jersey" accent. The last three have some Italian influence considering the huge numbers of Italian immigrants that settled there. See American Accents and British Accents for more info.
  • August 7, 2011
    Ryuuma
    ^^ That's a good start. We could also add examples of actual characters speaking said dialects/accents in order to make them more vulgar/oafish sounding. Two examples I can think of (in english) are Yangus and some other NP Cs from Dragon Quest VIII and Itsuki from Sengoku Basara / Devil Kings, who got a southern accent reflecting her status.
  • August 7, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    I think the Cockney accent (from an area of London) can also be used this way.

    I think it can also be a question of emphasis within a work. An Australian film, for example, may have more educated or urban characters use slight Aussie accents and less educated or rural characters use broader ones.
  • August 8, 2011
    aurora369
    If the work is Russian, the character will speak either mat (the dialect made of Cluster F Bomb) or fenya (The Mafiya's thieves' cant), or a mix of both.
  • August 8, 2011
    AFP
    For American works, a variety of American Accents get used, including the various "Urban" accents (which varies from one city to the next, and from one ethnic or social group to the next within each city). This includes accents used by ethnic minorities, and those used by white kids trying to sound like them. The middle-class white kid trying to talk like Dr. Dre is a particularly Acceptable Target in American media.
  • August 9, 2011
    hevendor717
    A good example for rude Brooklyn accent would be Bugs Bunny. As for vulgarity and general aloofness, you have Fran Drescher of The Nanny fame.
  • August 9, 2011
    AlexIDV
    In Sweden, they usually use the accent people in the southernmost region of Sweden speak: Scanian (Skånska)

    EDIT: Looks like TV Tropes can't handle certain characters? Well, it was supposed to be an A with a ring above it.
  • August 9, 2011
    Ryuuma
    I've added some examples, though this is only temporary. By the way, is just me or Southern accents seems to be the most used for this?
  • August 9, 2011
    randomsurfer
    ^^It'll probably be fine on the trope page; ykttw doesn't accept all Wiki Markup.
  • September 11, 2011
    Ryuuma
    BUMP
  • September 15, 2011
    Ryuuma
    Bump. Seriously guys, I need help on this one.
  • September 16, 2011
    Ryuuma
    bump
  • September 16, 2011
    randomsurfer
  • September 16, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    I can't say how true this is everywhere, but American works often have an underlying Slobs Versus Snobs dynamic, often with the Slobs being presented in a far more sympathetic light. These accents can be used to evoke this kind of underdog sympathy as soon as the character(s) begin to speak (Bugs Bunny strikes me a prime example of this).
  • September 19, 2011
    Ryuuma
    ^ Being vulgar doesn't make a character evil or nasty by default. There can be good characters using "vulgar" accents and evil characters using more "educated" accents or dialects.
  • September 19, 2011
    ladyofprocrastination
    An evil clown uses a decidedly creepy (American) Southern accent in an episode of The Sarah Jane Adventures.
  • September 19, 2011
    ladyofprocrastination
    Would the previous example go under America or England, since the show takes place there?
  • September 19, 2011
    69BookWorM69
    @Ryuuma No it doesn't. In fact, that was my point. American culture has a streak of anti-elitism (why else did President Obama take flack for wanting dijon mustard on his hot dog/hamburger/whateveritwas?). Bugs Bunny may be rascally, but he's still the hero of his cartoons and a representative of the common man.

    BTW A classic Cockney example is Eliza Dolittle's initial accent in Pygmalion and the musical adaptation My Fair Lady. Professor Higgins points out her vulgarity and low social status early on; the rest of the story revolves around her not only altering her speech but proving her worth despite her origins.
  • September 19, 2011
    Ryuuma
    ^^ If the accent displayed is American the goes under America.
  • October 5, 2011
    Ryuuma
  • October 6, 2011
    Chabal2
  • October 8, 2011
    Damr1990
    In México, the "Norteño"(northern) accent is often used in a similar that the US uses the Hick accent, there's also the "chilango" accent wich is used to denote somebody is from a "popular"(read, poor) street, that is low on the social class
  • October 8, 2011
    nman
    In English, French accents are usually jokingly used to make you seem like a pompous, rude person.
  • October 11, 2011
    yogyog
    Isn't this covered in pages like British Accents and American Accents?

    Isn't it Accent Adaptation?
  • October 11, 2011
    surgoshan
    ^ I think this is tropable; it's not just the presence of an accent, but a defining part of characterization that an accent marks a Lower Class Lout.

    Speaking of which, Lower Class Lout is a related trope.
  • October 12, 2011
    ChunkyDaddy
    In Bollywood movies, Bombay/Mumbai accent is used by characters to either appear dangerous or cool. Delhi/Punjabi accent is used by characters to appear cute.
  • December 19, 2011
    Ryuuma
    Bump
  • February 10, 2012
    Ryuuma
    Ari Bump
  • May 5, 2012
    Ryuuma
    Giga Bump
  • May 5, 2012
    HeartOfAnAstronaut
    In Gavin And Stacey South Wales and Essex accents are both mocked. They indicate that the characters are lower middle class and mostly pretty stupid. Stacey's South Wales accent comes off as a kind of Translation Convention of Valley Girl speak, whereas Bryn and Gwen sound sweet and naive. Smithy's Essex accent emphasises the fact that he talks complete rubbish and Pam and Dawn sound gossipy and shallow.

    Welsh accents can often be used this way in UK media because Wales has a reputation for being more rural than England, as well as being less wealthy. It's also very small (as opposed to Scotland which is bigger, has more major cities and more power than Wales). As such, Welsh characters are often either eccentric or naive or a bit dim. (Obviously this is inverted by the likes of Anthony Hopkins and Richard Burton)

    Is this just about accents being used to represent vulgarity whether that's rudeness or class? Because several of the examples here mention posh accents, cute accents, etc. Surely we can't just collect all accents from every language and all their connotations in different media? What about a few lists that would be similar to this one for listing common connotations of accents, e.g. Sexy Accents, Posh Accents
  • May 6, 2012
    Ryuuma
    Mmmh... you know what? You're right, that's a good idea. Excellent indeed.
  • May 6, 2012
    katiek
    Classic example: In Singin In The Rain, Lina Lamont is a beautiful silent film star... with a City Girl Squawk (a,k.a. "The Affect"). Dulcet-toned Kathy (Debbie Reynolds) is brought on to dub her voice, but not without the inevitable conflict.
  • May 6, 2012
    HeartOfAnAstronaut
    Ryuuma: I'm not sure if you were talking to me, but if you were I could start a Posh Accents YKTTW t omirror this one?
  • May 6, 2012
    Bagpiper
    This has potential to be a great page, but I think it's more of a Useful Notes type thing.
  • December 9, 2012
    Onitatsu
    Bump
  • December 9, 2012
    Chabal2
    French: An unsophisticated character can be given a ch'ti accent, equivalent to Deep South implications of unsophistication and semiliteracy (seen on Osaka), an inner-city lout will likely use a kind of mishmash of Arab and verlan (when Borat tries talking "ghetto", this is how it was portrayed in the French dub).
  • December 9, 2012
    WeAreAllKosh
    I'd have to think of specific examples, but it seems that in a lot of science fiction in TV and movies, if you hear alien characters with the universal-translator-thingamabob or whatever translating their speech into Cockney-sounding accents, chances are they're some sort of roughneck, criminal element, or street-savvy kind of character. Usually you'll see this in One Shot Characters in various episodes. I've seen this so often that it's hard to recall specifics, but if I can think of any I'll add them.

    On Babylon 5, some of the human characters in Downbelow also had cockney-sounding accents.
  • September 30, 2013
    damr1990
    soooo...bump?
  • September 30, 2013
    AP
    • In works from South Korea, any non-Seoul/Incheon dialect is considered rough, which reflects the attitude of the country. Usually, peole from the rest of the penninsula change their accent if they move ot Seoul.
  • April 5, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    • Jetta from Jem has a Cockney accent. She is often the most rude of The Misfits and is a borderline Token Evil Teammate to a group of already villainous characters.
  • April 5, 2016
    DAN004

    Compare Joi Sey
  • April 6, 2016
    AgProv
    In this universally loathed British TV advert, the Birmingham/Black Country accent is used as a marker for a sort of good-natured shallow tastelessness and lack of deeper intellect. Birmingham is regarded (by people outside The West Midlands) as the ugliest English regional accent and indicative of slowness and stupidity.

    Essex is perceived as belonging to chavs, parvenus, people at least on the fringes of criminality, people with money and no taste, people who are sexually promiscuous, et c. An Essex/Estuary English accent is audio shorthand for all these less-than-desirable things: an American equivalent might be New Jersey. (Joisey?)

    West Country and Norfolk accents are shorthand for agricultural, bucolic, country bumpkin, rustic "Wurzel" types.

    Liverpool and Manchester have connotations of streetwise scally, if not petty criminal; Yorkshire is associated with bloody-minded independence and regional chauvanism.

  • April 6, 2016
    DrNoPuma
    • Cajun Fox from Courage The Cowardly Dog is one of the few villains who is more like a lowlife thug than the usual supernatural threats. Likewise with the Creepy Cockroach Schwick, who has a Bronx accent.
  • April 6, 2016
    robinjohnson
    I don't know Resident Evil so can't say for sure what's going on in that example, but the "talks like a pirate" accent is Bristol/the West Country (historically a home of the shipbuilding industry, hence the association with pirates and sailors) and is often used to identify a Country Bumpkin in British works.
  • April 6, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    There are Philadelphia regional accents, right? I think Roxy from Jem has one but I can't tell.
  • April 6, 2016
    DrNoPuma
    Since this is about more than one type of accent, I think you should make the title plural.
  • April 6, 2016
    DAN004
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=czwra29s7je9wxkobfyp91rx