Created By: KingZeal on October 24, 2012 Last Edited By: KingZeal on July 3, 2014

Masculine Colors, Feminine Colors

A Missing Supertrope about colors and gender.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Just noticed that this is another Missing Supertrope.

Throughout human society, we have associated particular colors with particular character traits. Sometimes, this is subconscious—but most of the time, it's a construction of the time we're in. There was a time, for example, when pink was considered a more masculine color than blue. However, this was supposedly changed when American advertising campaigns began associating pink clothes for girls and blue for boys. For a time, however ("a time" meaning up until 1940!), the exact opposite was true.

Since then, certain colors have become more associated with a specific gender, though specifics depend on the era and the culture. Feminine colors tend to stay in the saturated and brighter shades (pink being a brighter shade of red, baby blues, etc). While masculine colors are usually somewhat darker in shade; "blood" red instead of pink, "midnight" blue instead of baby blue. Even this, however, depends upon the values of the era.

As such, This Wiki has a number of tropes which demonstrate the association between color and gender:

Related to Colour-Coded for Your Convenience, Clothing Reflects Personality.

Also related to tropes about Hair Colors.

No Examples, Please. This is only an index and a Super Trope.
Community Feedback Replies: 49
  • March 2, 2013
    Noah1
  • March 2, 2013
    katiek
    Just a minor grammatical comment: you either want Male / Female or Masculine / Feminine.
  • March 2, 2013
    lexicon
    Unlike all the others, Light Feminine And Dark Feminine have nothing to do with color despite how the picture looks.
  • March 2, 2013
    lexicon
    I think including Masculine Girl Feminine Boy is too much of a stretch because neither the title not description says anything about color. Pink Girl Blue Boy on the other hand needs to be on the list. Why are there so many colors associated with females anyway? Real Men Wear Pink only because they're very manly so they can afford to be feminine and all the others are about colors on women. You can add Virgin In A White Dress as well.

    I'd go with Masculine Colors Feminine Colors because it's not that the colors have gender.
  • March 3, 2013
    Koveras
    Masculine Colors Feminine Colors is a better title, indeed.
  • April 22, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    Well, there are Purple Is Powerful and Red Is Heroic, which are usually linked to masculinity by default but aren't specifically referred to as such in the trope (due to an oversight, no doubt; Purple Is Powerful is listed on Masculinity Tropes).

    Man In White is a pretty clear example. The Men In Black, too, perhaps? Or Tall Dark And Handsome?

    Blue Boy Pink Girl
  • April 22, 2013
    DunDun
    ^Would we want to list next to the entry of those tropes here as "typically seen as masculine/feminine"?

    Pink Girl Blue Boy might want to be mentioned along with Pink Boy Blue Girl.

    ??
  • April 22, 2013
    xanderiskander
    The Purple Is Powerful page mentions that purple is "also seen as one of the "girly shades" ". So yeah it's a little confusing that it's under masculinity tropes. I think it's equally likely to be used by either gender to be honest though.
  • April 22, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    ^^ Might be a good idea. Pink Boy Blue Girl is an inversion of Pink Girl Blue Boy, so it makes sense to mention them together.

    I'm pretty sure that that's a reference to Graceful Ladies Like Purple. It's a colour with multiple meanings depending on whether the character is male or female and how they act, and simultaneously somewhat gender-neutral (as the colour of nobility in general; power and grace are both aspects associated with that, I think).
  • April 23, 2013
    SevenOfDiamonds
    Women can usually wear about any color without being called masculine, but a man wearing pink, purple, pastels, or overly flashy colors might be called feminine. Saturation and softness plays a big part in it, and whether the character's in an occupation where flashy clothes are more acceptable.
  • April 23, 2013
    xanderiskander
    I think this should have a note in the description somewhere that feminine colors tend to stay in the saturated and brighter shades (pink being a brighter shade of red, baby blues, etc). While masculine colors are usually somewhat darker in shade. Like red instead of pink. Dark blue or a primary blue instead of the brighter blues.

    This is probably related to Light Girl Dark Boy and Pale Females Dark Males which have to do with the difference in skin and hair colors between girls and boys.
  • April 23, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    Makes sense.
  • April 23, 2013
    helterskelter
    A couple of things

    • Perhaps they should be sorted? Possibly by gender (male/female/male female), possibly by color.
    • True Blue Femininity, Graceful Ladies Like Purple, Pink Means Feminine should be grouped together?
    • Pink Boy Blue Girl is not an example, despite the name.
    • I disagree with the inclusion of Little Black Dress. These have to do with the associations of this color in general: black is considered a very fashionable, classy color on any gender. It doesn't mean anything particular to women.
    • I disagree with the inclusion of Light Feminine Dark Feminine. That is about personality, not coloration. It is not particular to gender, even: lighter colors symbolize a lighter personality, darker colors = darker personality. This is true across genders.
    • Winter Royal Lady doesn't belong. Yes, blues and whites are common, but that is simply due to the association with winter and ice, which is across the board. See An Ice Person.
    • Are we including hair color tropes like Red Headed Hero and Rose Haired Girl?

    Essentially, this supertrope should be about gender and color when gender is relevant to why they're wearing that color. For instance, red is always seen as a seductive color, but is still only worn by women. White on a woman denotes ethereal qualities as that trope is written. White on a man simply means he's very significant. However, Winter Royal Lady almost always includes two particular colors, but the colors signify nothing about her gender. The colors aren't relevant to the gender--the gender part of the trope is relevant to the classiness.
  • April 24, 2013
    KingZeal
    For one thing, this is a supertrope about color and gender, period.

    Winter Royal Lady, Light Feminine Dark Feminine and Little Black Dress are being added because in aggregate, they give insight as to what signals an audience receives in regards to color, hue, shade, or tone used to characterize or decorate a particular gender. Little Black Dress, for example, denotes something about women due to its prominent use in photography and the cultural attitude that every woman should have at least one, and that it signifies a special occasion depending on how she wears it.

    In short, this trope is not meant to pick and choose what association between colors and genders count or don't count.
  • April 24, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    ^^ I thought about sorting them by colour or by sex, but several of the tropes address multiple colours or both sexes.
  • April 25, 2013
    helterskelter
    ^^ First, you didn't address anything else I said.

    If you think Winter Royal Lady should be here, I firmly believe this isn't the Super Trope we need. It's not a Super Trope if it doesn't share a pattern. That's what makes it a Super Trope. I don't see the point in making a trope about gender and color when you disregard whether color has anything to do with gender in the trope. It should simply be about people and color, then.

    Really, you don't think it's silly that you're trying to include Light Feminine Dark Feminine which has nothing to do with color? Winter Royal Lady, which is the fashion version of An Ice Person and has far more to do with elements and gender? If that belongs, there's no reason not to include Sexy Santa Dress, which is always red, and so on. A Super Trope of when colors + gender have their own, unique connotations is great.
  • April 25, 2013
    KingZeal
    I think I addressed your argument pretty well, honestly.

    Trope patterns are things which have specific elements to them. Winter Royal Lady is a pattern because the snow motif corresponds WITH the color white or light blue, which (as stated aptly) by a poster above is one of the lighter colors often associated with femininity. If you ha

    Dark Feminine Light Feminine assigns specific personality traits to women based on what shade they are.

    Sexy Santa Dress , unlike a WinterRoyalLady doesn't inherently need to be red and white because the point of the trope is the style of the garment, not its color. Everything about Winter Royal Lady, including the color, is part of the association with femininity.
  • April 25, 2013
    xanderiskander
    Agree that it has to indicate gender colors to be on here. That's the point of making this index.

    Light Feminine Dark Feminine is a contrasting personality trope about a specific type of female duo. It has no place on a color index. It's not about their colors or what they look like. It's about a bright and happy character contrasting a character with a dark personality.

    Winter Royal Lady is about royal women who wear clothing that invokes a theme about winter and snow. It's not about feminine colors it's about winter colors. It doesn't belong here either.
  • April 25, 2013
    helterskelter
    ^^ Winter Royal Lady is about ice queens. As in, women called "Ice Queen Brunhilda" or "Snow Princess Annabelle" or something like that. It's not about women who dress in winter finery. It does not require any color association, although it is common. Therefore, it belongs just as much as Sexy Santa Dress. In fact, I'd argue that your blue example is about a Christmas velvet blue. So Sexy Santa Dress includes Christmas colors.

    In any case, I think you're quite wrong anyway. There is no reason to include tropes that aren't inherently about color and gender as they apply to each other, as opposed to a gendered trope that has color associations.
  • April 25, 2013
    KingZeal
    ^^ The point of the index is to group every instance in which color was used to characterize someone. Winter Royal Lady isn't just a random woman with ice powers. She is specifically designed, from the ground up, to invoke a regal and feminine appearance when associated with women. This would be like a rock man with big rockish muscles invoking the same look with darker shades.

    And if blue doesn't satisfy, then how about yellow? Or purple? Or black? How much more un-Christmas or Un-winter does it need to be for me to prove that it's the design of the dress and color has nothing to do with it?

    Can't really say the same about Winter Royal Lady. The color and femininity is vital to the entire motif. So is Dark Feminine Light Feminine. Without the specific colors, in addition to the feminine tropes, it does not work.
  • April 25, 2013
    xanderiskander
    Winter Royal Lady is primarilly about princesses having a title for ice, winter, north or anything describing cold. The colors aren't even required.

    Nobody said Winter Royal Lady is a woman with ice powers either. What was said was that what the description says about colors is that they're themed around ice and cold. That trope is not about blues whites or purples or whatever being feminine. It's about that specific type of princess being exotic from other princesses. Blues being feminine would be covered by True Blue Femininity.

    And Light Feminine And Dark Feminine doesn't say anywhere that colors are needed for it to work.. All that's said is that "The Light feminine is generally angelic and feels love and The Dark feminine is generally devilish and plays with desire. " So yes it works without the colors. Because as the page notes it's a character contrast trope. Not a color trope. The only way you could get color out of it is if you took the page picture literally.

    for me to prove that it's the design of the dress and color has nothing to do with it?

    This index is about masculine vs feminine colors right? Colors being equated to genders does have something to do with this index.
  • April 25, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    Light Feminine And Dark Feminine is specifically contrasted with Noble Male Roguish Male. The 'light' and 'dark' are metaphorical, not graphic.
  • April 25, 2013
    KingZeal
    Alright, LFDF has been removed. As for the other:

    ^^ That is not the point. Color is a part of the entire winter motif. The trope flat out says that the motif incorporates the colors. The mystery, elegance, and coldness is stated over and over again with different manners of decoration.

    And no, the index is not about Masculine colors versus Feminine colors. If that were the case, I wouldn't have both Man In White and Woman In White. It's about any association between a gender and a color, and depends upon several layers of context.
  • April 25, 2013
    xanderiskander
    It describes colors, but the point is the trope is not about that. Those colors in the description are not about being feminine. the laconic says "Winter-evoking royal titles are more glamorous and mysterious". The main point of the trope is it's a princess who has a title themed around cold or winter to be exotic. The colors are to emphasize the wintry title they're not what defines the trope.

    In fact I only see a handful of examples on that page that even mention what they wear. Most only talk about their title.
  • April 26, 2013
    helterskelter
    Zeal, if you refuse to change the tropes, then you need to change the title and description. As it stands now, you are describing a trope that is about colors and how they relate to gender in a relevant way, not just gender + some other thing for indexing purposes. This is not a Super Trope, it's an index. It should be refitted as such.
  • April 26, 2013
    DunDun
    Just to reword what's being said about Winter Royal Lady: the colors associated with that trope are winter themes not gender themes or sexuality themes. That trope's supertrope is closer to Color Coded Elements (blues/purples/etc. representing Winter representing An Ice Person) than this one.
  • April 26, 2013
    helterskelter
    ^ Yes. I think including them makes this index redundant, but if you must include them, you can't call it a super trope. There's no trope involved. It's just an index of any time color is there + gender. The description is behaving as if it is a Super Trope.
  • April 26, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    Helterskelter and Dun Dun: I think I understand what you're saying, and I think I'd agree were it not for one important point: the Winter Royal Lady is Always Female. The connection is not directly between the colours and femininity, but rather between the colours and winter and between winter and femininity. Because all three are entangled together in the trope, I think it should count.
  • April 26, 2013
    KingZeal
    How's this for a compromise: I'll add a segment after the list about just what Noaqiyeum said...tropes in which color is a secondary characteristic in an Always Male or Always Female trope. For example, Fat Sweaty Southerner In A White Suit, Gay Groom In A White Tux, and Fairytale Wedding Dress (explicitly stated to be white).

    Also, would White Stallion count? It's stated to be a symbol of manliness.
  • April 26, 2013
    DunDun
    @Noaqiyeum: This is about gender identities and gender roles, which are masculinity and femininity not male and female. Being Always Female and have something to do with colors does not mean it necessarily belongs to this super trope.
  • April 26, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    ...was that to me or to Zeal?
  • April 27, 2013
    helterskelter
    Hm...I'm not sure. I do like compromises, but I still disagree with the notion this counts as a super trope (i.e., an actual trope that's trying to say there's patterns in something) if we're including examples like Winter Royal Lady. I'll point out about your Sexy Santa Dress--you provided pictures of a real life costume, not an example of a trope. The examples on the page are red.

    I can definitely agree you're making an index (albeit a rather redundant one), but I don't agree it's a trope.
  • April 27, 2013
    lexicon
    I was going to agree that Light Feminine Dark Feminine should be taken off but it looks like it's already gone. This list is missing Virgin In A White Dress.
  • April 28, 2013
    helterskelter
    But Pink Boy Blue Girl is still there, despite people repeatedly saying that doesn't have anything to do with color.

    Anyway, on top of what I've already mentioned, there's the association with gender and hair/eye colors that needs to be cleared up, too.
  • April 30, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    Dun Dun - oh, you edited your reply. Did you read what I said about how the colours are tied to winter which is then tied to femininity? Always-feminine is the reason it's Always Female.

    Virgin In A White Dress, which Lex suggests, is similar - white means virginal, virgin means feminine.
  • April 30, 2013
    helterskelter
    ^ But that tells you about elements and seasons, and part of that trope is colors. But only a part. It is similar to a trope like Sexy Santa Dress, where the idea is the costume which is red because of the association with Santa. The color, in this case, is not relevant to gender. The elemental nature of it is. If you are going to include colors relevant to the trope + gender relevant to the trope instead of colors and gender relevant to each other, there's no reason not to include things like Sexy Santa Dress, Rose Haired Girl, etc.
  • April 30, 2013
    KingZeal
    Sexy Santa Dress has nothing to do with color. As I proved earlier, you can make it ANY color, and it's still a Sexy Santa Dress. Color has NOTHING to do with that trope, at all.

    The color restriction is an important connection between snow/ice and femininity. Also, Hair Colors will be mentioned.
  • April 30, 2013
    helterskelter
    has nothing to do with color

    No, color is an aspect that doesn't define it, but is always present. Same as this.

    As I proved earlier

    You did not. You provided an image of a costume. This is a trope. The examples of the trope are almost entirely in red (in fact, I don't see any exceptions).

    The color restriction is an important connection between snow/ice and femininity

    Which means it's about elements and femininity. Not color. The association is entirely about elements, and elements have colors associated with them. The color is a tertiary aspect of the trope because of that.

    As I've said, this isn't a trope, it's an index". As I said, if you want to call it an index, fine. But it's not a Super Trope, because you're taking a way from patterns.
  • May 1, 2013
    KingZeal
    No, color is an aspect that doesn't define it, but is always present. Same as this.

    No it isn't. I showed above that you can make it any color at all.

    You did not. You provided an image of a costume. This is a trope. The examples of the trope are almost entirely in red (in fact, I don't see any exceptions).

    The costume IS THE TROPE.

    Which means it's about elements and femininity. Not color. The association is entirely about elements, and elements have colors associated with them. The color is a tertiary aspect of the trope because of that.

    As I said, then I can add a point at the bottom which points that out, but since color IS an important connection to femininity and winter, it is part of what this trope is. This trope is about association, even tertiary.
  • May 1, 2013
    helterskelter
    No it isn't. I showed above that you can make it any color at all.

    You have me a RL example of a fictional trope. Which is always red.

    The costume IS THE TROPE.

    The costume as seen in fiction is always red.

    but since color IS an important connection to femininity and winter

    No. The connection is WINTER and femininity. WINTER has its own color. You do realize this trope is not about when women dress in blues and whites to invoke winter, but actually about when women are styled as Snow Queens or Ice Princesses and such? And the costume follows? A woman in a Happy Holidays Dress in blue and white isn't this trope. The Snow Queen is. It's about the title + winter, which only women get a royal association with (almost assuredly because of the fairy tale). Plenty of other people get associated with the winter. That's not a feminine thing. It's the "Queen of Winter" idea.

    This trope is about association, even tertiary.

    But my point is that you're not naming a trope. A trope as in a pattern that means something in fiction. The Super Trope to the tropes you have listed is the idea that certain colors connotate certain things about men and women, depending on who is wearing them. That's a unique, important idea in fiction. That white on a man means power and white on a woman means mysteriousness and so on.

    But just listing every time color is relevant to a trope and gender is relevant to a trope--whether they are relevant to each other--is an index. There's no trope involved.
  • May 1, 2013
    KingZeal
    You have me a RL example of a fictional trope. Which is always red.

    No it isn't. The page itself SAYS it doesn't have to be red. Only "usually". The trope is about the design, NOT the color.

    The costume as seen in fiction is always red.

    Not according to the trope itself, it isn't.

    No. The connection is WINTER and femininity. WINTER has its own color.

    Yes. Which is exactly my point. White = Winter = Femininity. Tertiary though it may be, that's still a connection.

    You do realize this trope is not about when women dress in blues and whites to invoke winter, but actually about when women are styled as Snow Queens or Ice Princesses and such? And the costume follows?

    Yes. So?

    A woman in a Happy Holidays Dress in blue and white isn't this trope. The Snow Queen is.

    The Snow Queen is a trope?

    It's about the title winter, which only women get a royal association with (almost assuredly because of the fairy tale). Plenty of other people get associated with the winter. That's not a feminine thing. It's the "Queen of Winter" idea.

    Let Me Get This Straight.

    Being "the Queen" of a metaphysical abstract has nothing to do with an association to femininity? Is that what you're saying?

    But my point is that you're not naming a trope. A trope as in a pattern that means something in fiction. The Super Trope to the tropes you have listed is the idea that certain colors connotate certain things about men and women, depending on who is wearing them. That's a unique, important idea in fiction. That white on a man means power and white on a woman means mysteriousness and so on.

    But just listing every time color is relevant to a trope and gender is relevant to a trope--whether they are relevant to each other--is an index. There's no trope involved.

    Tropes In Aggregate. The entire point to this page, as well as Women Are Delicate, Men Are Tough, and several other YKTT Ws I'm making is to group together tropes which create a pattern through association. As was mentioned before, white--both on its own and mixed with other colors such as soft blue and pink--is associated with femininity. Snow, likewise, is also symbolic of femininity both for its color, softness, beauty and delicacy. The two concepts overlap.

    Take, for example, Virgin In A White Dress. That trope is about three things: virginity, femininity, and white in exactly the same sense that this trope is about winter, femininity, and either white, blue, or other colors associated with that. And unlike Sexy Santa Dress, it is specifically those colors.
  • May 1, 2013
    helterskelter
    No it isn't. The page itself SAYS it doesn't have to be red. Only "usually". The trope is about the design, NOT the color.

    Neither does Winter Royal Lady, in fact. The only requirement is that you are winter-themed royalty. The trope description only requires that. It goes on to list what else generally follows. In fact, as you point out that theoretically you can have on a Sexy Santa Dress in yellow or pink, you can theoretically have a Winter Royal Lady in orange or purple, since the only hard-and-fast definition of the trope is that she is a winter-themed royal lady. Is it really unlikely? Of course, but it's really unlikely to see a Sexy Santa Dress in anything but red. But it would be an example if created.

    Yes. Which is exactly my point. White = Winter = Femininity. Tertiary though it may be, that's still a connection.

    No, it's winter royalty = femininity, which often comes with the implication of wearing white, blue, silver.

    The Snow Queen is a trope?

    Actually, yes, it's this trope. But I was giving you an example. Don't be obtuse.

    Being "the Queen" of a metaphysical abstract has nothing to do with an association to femininity? Is that what you're saying?

    I'm saying that the assocation with WINTER is not what is feminine. It's the unique brand of winter + royalty is Always Female. We have winter + person as a trope: An Ice Person. It's the unique extra part--the royalty--which is unique. We use female gendered terms because this trope is Always Female.

    Tropes In Aggregate.

    Which this one isn't. That's about tropes that don't seem to be tropes unless you like at society, a whole genre, etc. For instance, Most Common Superpower. That's just big breasts, right? Well, not when you're looking at superheroines. Then it's a trope.

    But this doesn't suddenly become a trope by looking at society or a genre. This is an index.

    which create a pattern through association

    Yes! But the thing is you're actively killing that pattern when you include tropes like Winter Royal Lady. You're taking out what should be a trope and making it into an index. The trope that this is is the idea that certain colors imply certain things on different genders. That is the super trope. But the color on Winter Royal Lady is because winter is colored blue and ice, not because women in blue and white mean something.

    That trope is about three things: virginity, femininity, and white in exactly the same sense that this trope is about winter, femininity, and either white, blue, or other colors associated with that

    The difference being that virginity has a female association. White on a female means purity, innocent allure. White on a man doesn't. See, that has a unique association. The color, as seen on a woman, is what is unique.

    But what about Winter Royal Lady? We know that winter + person isn't unique. We have An Ice Person. We know that blue, white, silver = winter isn't unique. We have Color Coded Elements. So what's unique here? The royal aspect. It's winter + royalty = female trope. Not blue + winter = female or blue + royalty = female.
  • May 1, 2013
    KingZeal
    Neither does Winter Royal Lady, in fact. The only requirement is that you are winter-themed royalty. The trope description only requires that. It goes on to list what else generally follows. In fact, as you point out that theoretically you can have on a Sexy Santa Dress in yellow or pink, you can theoretically have a Winter Royal Lady in orange or purple, since the only hard-and-fast definition of the trope is that she is a winter-themed royal lady. Is it really unlikely? Of course, but it's really unlikely to see a Sexy Santa Dress in anything but red. But it would be an example if created.

    It's a hell of a lot less likely to see a Winter Royal Lady in any color except one that invokes winter and pure white snow/ice. If the colors change "theoretically", it will still be themed around that. A Sexy Santa Dress can be any color at all, even if mostly red. The colors do not even have to have anything to do with Christmas. The design of the outfit is what invokes "Santa", with the color being a bonus.

    No, it's winter royalty = femininity, which often comes with the implication of wearing white, blue, silver.

    I fail to see the difference.

    Actually, yes, it's this trope. But I was giving you an example. Don't be obtuse.

    I'm not. According to this site, it's not a trope. It's the name of a story, but that character is a Winter Royal Lady.

    Which this one isn't. That's about tropes that don't seem to be tropes unless you like at society, a whole genre, etc. [snip]

    But this doesn't suddenly become a trope by looking at society or a genre. This is an index.

    That's not what it is. It's when a pattern is used over and over again, period. The page says, "Until you look at a whole genre, or even all of fiction, and notice that this particular artistic choice happens a lot." Where are you getting this "society" thing from?

    Women being associated with snow and the color white is an aggregate trope because it happens often enough in fiction that a pattern appears merely from the association.

    For instance, Most Common Superpower. That's just big breasts, right? Well, not when you're looking at superheroines. Then it's a trope. ''

    No it isn't. It's specifically big breasts being the default body type for superheroines. In other words, because of the prominence of its use.

    Yes! But the thing is you're actively killing that pattern when you include tropes like Winter Royal Lady. You're taking out what should be a trope and making it into an index. The trope that this is is the idea that certain colors imply certain things on different genders. That is the super trope. But the color on Winter Royal Lady is because winter is colored blue and ice, not because women in blue and white mean something.

    No it isn't. As I said, I started this entire trope merely to catalog the different types of colors which are associated with gender, and the ways in which they're associated with gender. Women being associated with ice and snow, if it's this problematic for inclusion, might need a Missing Supertrope added to this in addition to Winter Royal Lady. But as it stands, WRL is this trope because it associates women with the AESTHETICS of snow and ice. It's about her APPEARING like winter itself, which includes color.

    The difference being that virginity has a female association. White on a female means purity, innocent allure. White on a man doesn't. See, that has a unique association. The color, as seen on a woman, is what is unique.

    Since when does white on a man not mean "purity"? Says who? Are you saying that because of the write-up for Man In White?

    White only has a female association because we give it one. The same with "pure snow" and it being associated with gentleness and purity and, yes, femininity.

    But what about Winter Royal Lady? We know that winter + person isn't unique. We have An Ice Person. We know that blue, white, silver = winter isn't unique. We have Color Coded Elements. So what's unique here? The royal aspect. It's winter + royalty = female trope. Not blue + winter = female or blue + royalty = female.''

    Again: so what? Winter and royalty being associated with femininity is exactly my point. The winter theme includes colors associated with femininity.
  • May 1, 2013
    helterskelter
    It's a hell of a lot less likely to see a Winter Royal Lady in any color except one that invokes winter and pure white snow/ice

    How many examples are there on the page that aren't red?

    Where are you getting this "society" thing from?

    Because those are the reasons for the patterns in genre and medium? Like Not Too Bi.

    No it isn't. It's specifically big breasts being the default body type for superheroines. In other words, because of the prominence of its use.

    Which is exactly what I said.

    It's about her APPEARING like winter itself, which includes color.

    No, it implies the color, just as Sexy Santa Dress implies the color. It is not required.

    Since when does white on a man not mean "purity"?

    When gendered and thus applying to this index? Yes, it doesn't. No such trope like Virgin Man In A White Suit exists because men are not associated with purity in fiction--people can be. Men aren't. When you see men in white, the trope association is never virginity, which is not really true of women.

    The winter theme includes colors associated with femininity.

    And in this case, the association is with winter, not femininity. Just as Sexy Santa Dress is the association of Christmas and Santa.
  • May 1, 2013
    KingZeal
    I have a lot of issues with many of the arguments you're making, but I'm going to back down. Mostly because going through Winter Royal Lady, I think it's two or three different tropes in one. I think you're right in that the trope is meant to state that a title associated with winter is what it's about, but it also goes into how other costuming and such are also important. So there's two tropes. And what's also missing is the associate between winter and femininity itself, as I've said.

    But, I'll bring that up in the TRS or Trope forums.
  • May 1, 2013
    helterskelter
    Hm...well, that's no good. I don't want to bully you into something you disagree with. Perhaps we should Ask The Tropers on their opinion, and just settle with that?
  • July 2, 2014
    Noah1
  • July 2, 2014
    DAN004
  • July 2, 2014
    Synchronicity
    ^I'd say Shy Blue Haired Girl, Rose Haired Girl should be added onto the page.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=cqm4chpba4zezs9wlpowli4i