Created By: SeaRover on February 16, 2013 Last Edited By: SeaRover on February 23, 2015

Food Kitchen Sink

All kinds of foods showcased throughout a work.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Needs a Better Title and an appropriate page quote.

And more!

It is no secret that video gameplay is not meant to be taken literally. The way food works is no exception. You know how it goes: You either walk over a food in question or, in RPGs, select it on the item screen. Whoever consumes it (presumably in one gulp) either gains points or recovers damage, or something or other. Such also applies to other similar-purposed things like first aid kits.

For this trope, it's not enough to have one kind of food, a few kinds, or even an entire group, such as fruits or vegetables, function as items. There has to be an entire variety of food that has a common role for the player. Not to say that they must all do the same thing; they could be all items that recover different amounts of health or have different functions altogether. Alternately, a wide variety of foods to cook up from more basic foods or to serve or order at a restaurant counts as this trope. Food being showcased through a puzzle game also counts as this trope.

This should not be confused with Level Ate, which is about food-themed worlds, nor is it enough for the game itself to be food-themed (barring puzzle games, as mentioned). This is about all kinds of food appearing throughout the game as some kind of goods, at least on the sidelines. If food is present mostly in the form of enemies, then it doesn't count.

Related to Hyperactive Metabolism, since by and large the purpose of this trope is to provide food items that restore health, improves stats, and so on; as well as Edible Collectible, which is when the food mostly just nets the player some points. Related to Food Porn, as a variant in which the sheer variety of food available is beyond what would be expected for the genre, though games that are specifically about food can fall under this.

(Note: Please include at least a handful of examples of food found in a given game, so that we don't have to consult a walkthrough, YouTube, etc. for validation.)


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Adventure RPG 
  • Many Castlevania games starting from Castlevania: Symphony of the Night include dozens of different food items to find on top of the standard Pot Roast, ranging from fresh fruit all the way up to modern dishes that shouldn't even exist in the depicted time period, each one with a well-drawn sprite and a brief description. SotN alone offers things like cheesecake, pudding, strawberries, spaghetti, hamburgers, apples, miso soup, and pineapples.
  • Vanillaware sure is fond of this trope:
    • In Muramasa: The Demon Blade, you can get your hands on various kinds of fruits, alcoholic drinks, vegetables, and raw meat, as well as bags of rice. Those first two recover Life Flame and Spirit, while the rest serve as ingredients for more complex things like hot-pots, houtou, etc.
    • Odin Sphere also has the same concept, and an even greater variety of recipes. Have fun cooking up all kinds of salads, soups, omelets, snacks, desserts and so on!
    • And the proud tradition continues in Dragon's Crown, with various meats, seafood, vegetables, etc. that you can obtain from three different dungeons!

    Beat Em Up 
  • Various food items (as well as weapons and loot) in the main Final Fight trilogy can be revealed by busting things like crates, oil drums, barrels, etc. Sushi, chocolate, chicken, beer, spinach, burgers, curry, and more, just waiting for someone to break a water cooler!
  • In Cadillacs and Dinosaurs, stuff you'll find by breaking various objects include gum, barbecued ribs, lobsters, hot dogs, cake, and parfaits. Sometimes, fat guys also drop food when you hit them, and there are also a few sirloins that the bad guys are seen feasting on around a campfire at the beginning of level 5.
  • Violent Storm features lobsters, green tea, cherries, apples, ice cream, pizzas, and plenty more inside crates, barrels, etc. There are also certain things that would fit into the scenery naturally, such as oranges that fall from palm trees or a pizza that someone happens to be carrying.

    Fighting 
  • The Super Smash Bros. series (from Melee onward) has "food" as one of the items. This is a variety of different food and drinks you can eat to regain a small bit of health. A few of them are burgers, ice cream, apples, pizza, tea, chocolate, orange juice, and cake.

    First Person Shooter 
  • In Kid Icarus: Uprising, Pitt regenerates most of his health from all manner of food, including apples, grapes, melons, hamburgers, ice-cream, donuts, cakes, bars of chocolate, meat, sushi, and the Drink of the Gods.

    MMORPG 
  • Runescape has at least 62 different types of food, based on the wiki. These range from baked potatoes to cocktails to pies.
  • Guild Wars 2 has enough to warrant four different food groups: Soups, Meals, Snacks, and Desserts.

    Platformer 
  • In Chip-chan Kick, enemies turn into either food or power-ups when defeated. What they can turn into depends on what stage you're on. For example, enemies in the city leave behind candy bars, chocolate cornets, donuts, and croissants among other things, while the zoo features things like pizzas, cheeseburgers, ice cream cones, and sticks of bubblegum. All food items give you points, good for extra lives, and while most people will find them useless, you can only proceed to the next round in each stage when there are no more pickups left to obtain, so you might as well eat whatever's available once you defeat everything onscreen.
  • Many Kirby games, starting with Kirby Super Star, feature things like snowcones, oranges, pancakes, baby bottles, pea pods, pudding, corn, and lots more in all its main games, to say nothing of M-tomatoes (which completely max out your life meter) and lollipops (which make you temporarily invincible). One of the six main games in KSS is even called Gourmet Race, which is all about that.
  • The Pang/Buster Bros. trilogy offers things like corn, apples, coffee, donuts, and pineapples. Collecting these just nets you some points, except for in the SNES version of Super Buster Bros., where you can earn a continue for every ten you collect without losing any continues.
  • Prehistorik Man had a lot of various foodstuffs as collectibles, since the object of the quest is to gather food for the tribe. Said food comes in four groups: Dairy, junk, fruits, and big foods.
  • Bubble Bobble has several dozen food items to offer, depending on how long it takes you to clear a given level and whether you're playing one or two players. Taking longer will get you mostly fruits and vegetables, while making shorter work will net you things like ice cream, popsicles, French fries, donuts, sushi, and bowls of rice.
  • In Sonic Unleashed, you can buy foodstuffs at various shops, from which Sonic will gain exp while Chip simply comments on what he eats. These include melloyam, egg puffs, peaches, oranges, egg candy, tomatoes, and of course, chili dogs.

    Simulators 
  • Tomodachi Life features a wide, WIDE variety of different foods in four different categories:
    • Entrees, such as pork cutlets, pasta pesto, and roast beef.
    • Side dishes, such as tacos, meat-and-potato stew, eggplants, baked potatoes, and avocados.
    • Snacks and sweets, such as cookies, oranges, cinnamon rolls, lollipops, candy corns, candy apples, brownies, cotton candy, and pastries.
    • Beverages, such as eggnog, root beer floats, lemonade, cappuccinos, apple cider, and orange juice.
  • Neopets is just ZANY with this trope, even though a lot of its offerings are rather gross. Here's a "taste" of what it has to offer!
  • Cooking is a fundamental aspect in many Harvest Moon games, in which you can whip up various meals, soups, salads, desserts, and what-have-you.

    Standard RPG 
  • The Paper Mario series, starting with basic items like berries, apples, lemons, cake mix, coconuts, and of course, mushrooms. Each game has a cook who can combine items together to make more complex things like spaghetti, soup, and cakes (or even non-food items such as Dizzy Dials and Sleepy Sheep).
  • The entire Tales Series gives you the pleasure of combining all kinds of food, such as chicken, cabbage, beef, and eggs, into full-out dishes such as hamburgers and rice balls.
  • Earthbound
    • While Earthbound Zero doesn't have a whole lot to offer as far as food goes, the sky's the limit with Earthbound! From burgers, fries, cookies, and Skip Sandwiches in your hometown, to more elegant foods such as iced tea in Summers! Of course, the amounts of HP a lot of them recover are less than enemies deal where and when they're available, and thus go unbought by most players. There's even an NPC in Onett's burger joint that advises you not to bother with cheaper foods available.
    • Mother 3 continues this tradition. Initially, given the setting, your diet consists of things like nuts, mushrooms, beef jerky, and cheese. Not long into the game, though, come bags of pork chips, lootable from defeated Pigmask soldiers, marking the beginning of the end of the simple life that defines Tazmily Village up until then with the first processed foods since the end of the old world.
  • The Elder Scrolls
    • Examples found in the series include bread, butter, cheese, ale, carrots, stew, and various kinds of meat.
    • In Morrowind and Oblivion, food (of all kinds) is a type of ingredient, which can be eaten raw or used to make potions; they have various effects, mostly restoring stamina.
    • In Skyrim, food is different from ingredients and can have a plethora of effects, from Health Food to poor man's potions, depending on how rare is the item.
  • Chantelise and its sequel Recettear share a large collection of items, many of which are various kinds of food. Said foods include oranges, cutlet bowls, candy, walnut bread, shortcake, kid's lunches, and melons.

    Wide Open Sandbox 
  • Minecraft, along with having a hunger bar to determine when you should eat and when you can't, features a wide plethora of food with which to keep it full, such as apples, carrots, steaks, cakes, pies, etc.

Community Feedback Replies: 52
  • February 16, 2013
    KTera
    I think this is a common element throughout the Tales series. I've only played Symphonia and Vesperia, but they both have a cooking mechanic like the one in Phantasia.
  • February 16, 2013
    dvorak
    Obviously, closely related to Health Food.
  • February 17, 2013
    KZN02
    Pokemon: though introduced in Gen 2, Gen 3 onwards has a wide variety of berries with punny names like the titular creatures useful in many ways.
  • February 17, 2013
    SeaRover
    Berries are only one food group. A game has to cover all kinds of food in order for it to count.
  • February 17, 2013
    Bisected8
    What's the difference between this and Health Food?
  • February 17, 2013
    Stratadrake
    The current image doesn't illustrate that all these foods do basically the same thing. Health Food (which is an unforgivable name btw) is about videogame food restoring HP only.
  • February 17, 2013
    SeaRover
    Okay. Maybe "a common purpose" was kinda redundant, since anyone would be able to gather that anyway. What I meant is that it's not enough for a game to showcase food all over the place. Games like Panic Restaurant and Kung Food, for instance, do not count, because that's about fighting food, not collecting food items. Paper Mario, on the other hand, does count, because it features all kinds of food as items, even though each food item's purpose varies between restoring HP, restoring FP, attacking enemies, etc.
  • February 18, 2013
    aurora369
    Used variously in The Elder Scrolls series. In Morrowind and Oblivion, food (of all kinds) is a type of ingredient, which can be eaten raw or used to make potions; they have various effects, mostly restoring stamina.

    In Skyrim, food is different from ingredients and can have a plethora of effects, from Health Food to poor man's potions, depending on how rare is the item.
  • February 18, 2013
    Chinky123
    Also in Minecraft
  • February 18, 2013
    Medinoc
    Prehistorik Man had a lot of various foodstuffs as collectibles, since the object of the quest was to gather food for the tribe. Including fries, burgers...
  • February 20, 2013
    SeaRover
    I was just informed that the quote "What about 'food heals you'" only makes things confusing for this trope. If anyone's still interested, I think a better quote might be in order, but I'm not sure what would make a good one for this trope.

    Any suggestions?
  • February 25, 2013
    Zanreo
    The Super Smash Bros series has "food" as one of the items, this is a variety of different food and drinks you can eat to regain a small bit of health. A few of them are burgers, ice cream, apples, pizza, tea, chocolate, orange juice and cake. Another different food item is Maxim Tomatoes, which removes all damage.
  • February 15, 2015
    SeaRover
    Okay. It's been two years since I opened this prototrope. If there even was a "Watch" feature, I failed to notice it, or else I would have been alerted to Zanreo's suggested example, which s/he posted a whole five days after I made my last post.

    So, while the discussion did more or less fizzle out by that point, we didn't exactly rule this concept out as a potential trope. Anyone reading this (first time or since back then) think it's ready for launch, just add a hat.
  • February 15, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ you can use the "flag" feature for that.
  • February 15, 2015
    SeaRover
    Oh, I see. Never occurred to me to see what that actually was for.

    Anyway, changes made as of today:

  • February 15, 2015
    Bisected8
    Not to be confused with Gourmet Gaming.
  • February 15, 2015
    Koveras
  • February 15, 2015
    SeaRover
    Not an example. The description says that there needs to be all different kinds of food, not just one kind.
  • February 15, 2015
    Koveras
    OK.
  • February 15, 2015
    henke37
    • Recettear and Chantelise share a large collection of items, many of which is various kinds of food.
  • February 15, 2015
    SeaRover
    Added those two games, but from now on, please make sure you name examples of food items obtainable in a given game. That way, I don't have to look up a walkthrough or something to make sure the example in question is valid. (I already took care of that for you, so don't worry now.)
  • February 17, 2015
    Prfnoff
    "So, while the discussion did more or less fizzle out by that point, we didn't exactly rule this concept out as a potential trope."

    It might have been potentially tropeworthy back then, but I launched a very similar trope, Edible Collectible, over half a year ago.
  • February 17, 2015
    LadyJuse
    What about Kid Icarus Uprising? Pitt gets most of his health regeneration from food. "Floor ice-cream gives you health" after all (maybe that could be the page quote)
  • February 18, 2015
    SeaRover
    It might have been potentially tropeworthy back then, but I launched a very similar trope, Edible Collectible, over half a year ago.

    While that trope is indeed similar, this one is primarily about a vast variety of food available in a given game. A game like Pac-Man would not count, because fruits are the only kind of food you can get your hands on in that game. Nor is it enough for there to be a few food items in different food groups. For instance, Kiratto Kaiketsu: 64 Tanteidan (a Japanese N64 game) has five different food items (three of them all being sweets, no less) as a few item cards, but that isn't enough to qualify for this trope.

    That said, if it's not too common to trope, and given an even better title, this trope would obviously be a subtrope of that one.

    "Floor ice-cream gives you health" after all (maybe that could be the page quote)

    That would be more descriptive of Hyperactive Metabolism.
  • February 18, 2015
    SolipSchism
    No Trope Is Too Common; Chairs are not chairs because chairs are common, chairs are chairs because chairs have no narrative significance in a vacuum. This is most assuredly not Chairs.

    And Your Reward Is Edible might be related, but I'm drawing a blank on explaining how. Would also like to see an explanation of how this is related to Hyperactive Metabolism and a Sub Trope to Edible Collectible and Food Porn. Don't assume it's self-explanatory, and don't make readers go to those pages and read the whole thing just to understand how the two are related.

    And is this really a Sub Trope of Food Porn? Some of these games don't even have a visual representation of the food, it's just there. That's hardly porn of any kind. (Edit: Although I guess the sheer variety of foods in a given game could qualify it.)

    I agree that this needs a better title; "Pickup Gourmet" doesn't mean anything to me. I literally can't parse what it's saying, even after reading the laconic and description.
  • February 18, 2015
    SeaRover
    Related to those tropes for reasons I already mentioned in the description:

    Hyperactive Metabolism: The food in many of these games restore health. ("Whoever consumes it...recovers damage, or something or other.")

    Edible Collectible: In other games, where they mostly just net you some points. ("Whoever consumes it...either gains points" etc.)

    Food Porn: Okay, so, some of them don't actually show any of the food in question (for example, Earthbound), but the trope as a whole is still at least related. Just looked at the page, and just noticed an entry for the Castlevania series which would fit nicely as-is here (just need to find some lists and cite some examples of what it has to offer).
  • February 18, 2015
    SolipSchism
    I understand that the description includes information that supports those connections, I'm just saying that it's poor form to just have statements like "Related to X, Sub Trope of Y, See also Z," without any obvious connection to why. The information should be logically arranged/connected so that I don't have to read the whole description to understand a small part of it.

    See Goddamned Boss for a good example of a trope that explains its connections to other tropes instead of just stating that there are connections.

    I see the relation to Food Porn now; in a game that features this trope, the sheer volume of options and variety in the food available makes it an example. (The Tales series is included on Food Porn, and the write-up for that one convinced me that it's legit, because I was initially going to point to Tales as an example of why it shouldn't fit Food Porn, but it actually fits quite well.)

    A proposal for what I'm talking about, though not necessarily a final product:

    Related to Hyperactive Metabolism, since by and large the purpose of this trope is to provide food items that restore health, improves stats, and so on; as well as Edible Collectible, which is when the food mostly just nets the player some points. Sub Trope of Food Porn, as a variant in which the sheer variety of food available is beyond what would be expected for the genre.
  • February 18, 2015
    SolipSchism
    Example work titles need to be italicized. Also, a lot of the examples currently included reference each other, which is super unhelpful and confusing. All of the "X work does the same thing" or "Similarly, Y work" needs to go.

    This is shaping up nicely, though.

    The Elder Scrolls example seems to be multiple examples and needs its Example Indentation cleaned up.

    Examples need to be written in present tense; a few are written in past tense.
  • February 18, 2015
    SeaRover
    Just modified the description to be a little more inclusive, particularly of puzzle games and the concept of cooking. So yeah, even I'd agree that a better title is in order. If anyone can think of anything, I'd more than appreciate it.
  • February 18, 2015
    SolipSchism
    Loads And Loads Of Food? Doesn't really capture the variety aspect, though. God, I'm hungry.
  • February 18, 2015
    DAN004
    Subtrope of Narrative Filigree
  • February 19, 2015
    SeaRover
    Not really. Gameplay of any kind is full of details irrelevant to the plot. Most enemies you kill or battles you fight? Most items you pick up in general? The puzzles themselves in any puzzle game with any story at all? It's all not only interesting, but part of the very reason we play games in the first place, even though they're still about as meaningful as "How many peas were on his plate?" at the end of the day.

    (Funny, that I'd refer to peas that part of an analogy, within a discussion about a trope about food.)
  • February 19, 2015
    Arivne
  • February 19, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^^ Well. The difference, I think, is that it's the variety of food items available is more than what's necessary for the plot, but still exists for a purpose. It's not the same as encountering fourteen identical goblins on your way from Adventure Town to the Hub City; in the sense of Narrative Filigree, that's just one goblin. But if you encounter fourteen unique goblins in that fifteen-minute walk, and they were all individually designed (rather than some sort of randomly-generated uniqueness), that's pretty notable.

    The fact that somebody bothered to hard-code 4,096 different varieties of cheesecake into the game just so your Lethal Chef White Mage character could experiment with different flavors and techniques when she's supposed to be on a quest to Save The World and you could realistically get through the entire game without cooking a single dish is what makes it an example.

    ...I think.
  • February 19, 2015
    SeaRover
    A friend of mine just asked how "different varieties of food in a video game" constitutes a trope. My attempt to answer her question was that where the developers could've just settled for one or several kinds of food, they had gone the extra mile to be creative with what you can eat in the game. Her reply to that was as follows:

    For parallel, Color Contrast is a trope and its page describes an function in drawing attention to something, and it has subtropes for popular combinations and how they're used, but no sub pages to list "this shows covers blue from hex code 09192c to hex code 9ebbdc, no further". Like, I can see the point of a page on how odd game food acts, but a page just devoted to pointing out that sometimes artists put effort into designing it?

    To be sure, I don't expect any trope to be as technical as the color value examples she specified. Despite what she said, though, I'm still having lots of fun with how well this is panning out.

    If anyone's got any take on all that, I'll be glad to read it.
  • February 19, 2015
    SolipSchism
    "sometimes artists put effort into designing it"

    Not so. Somebody puts effort into designing just about everything in a game, as long as they actually care about it.

    What makes this a trope is the extra detail and the fact that it's not central to the plot. It adds depth to the experience, but depth that is tangential to the plot; whether or not you teach Raine to boil water without blowing it up by the end of Tales Of Symphonia has no bearing whatsoever on anything at all. Despite that, the cooking mechanic does factor into some (totally irrelevant to anything) skits, and Raine being a Lethal Chef is a minor plot point early in the game (though, again, irrelevant to the main plot).

    You can achieve the same game-mechanic effect with a large variety of potions or spells, yet for some reason many games choose to go with a huge variety of foods instead.

    Her analogy seems really weird, too. She's comparing hypothetically splitting up Color Contrast by hex codes for specific colors, when this trope is just about games that feature an unusually wide variety of food that has various purposes. No one is suggesting to split this trope up between works that focus on pastries, vs. meat dishes, or splitting them up by calorie counts. Maybe I'm missing the point but I don't see how the hex code thing is relevant to anything.
  • February 19, 2015
    SeaRover
    She's comparing hypothetically splitting up Color Contrast by hex codes for specific colors

    She has just explained to me that she used hex codes because Gimp was open, and she had to make the response in question quick and didn't have time to look up the English names of the color variations in question.
  • February 19, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Regardless, she's talking about splitting up a trope using Ludicrously Precise values. I don't see how that's relevant.
  • February 19, 2015
    SeaRover
    Having thought about it, the inclusion of possible puzzle games is somewhat of a gray area for whatever kind of aesthetics I'm thinking of as a whole.

    On the one hand, I am not looking for Level Ate or even the likes of food-themed works such as Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs (and yes, that movie did have a video game spinoff).

    On the other hand, looking past food and at aesthetics in general, let me copy a few pieces from a past Live Journal entry of mine:

    [W]hat fascinates me [about Candy Crush Saga] isn't so much the actual gameplay itself, but the variety of cute little items each game consists of. For example, from what I've seen on their respective ads, Farm Heroes features things like suns, raindrops, strawberries, turnips, and carrots, all in a uniform size, while Bubble Witch has things like snakes, batwings, frogs' eyes, skulls, and spiders all in uniform-sized bubbles.

    Come to think of it, another good analogy here would involve certain games such as Jason Storm in Space Chase 3, Super Mario Bros 3, Super Mario World, and Banjo Kazooie, which all have various little items in a tiny, uniform size, even if they're a different genre altogether.

    http://dmxrated.livejournal.com/2013/11/27/

    Taking the above into account, while Cloudy is very much ruled out, I'm starting to think that a game like Panic Restaurant, which offers a variety of food as enemies, might count after all.

    Anyone here understand what exactly I'm trying to place a finger on?
  • February 19, 2015
    SolipSchism
    Well. Just to be clear, what I'm reading from the description is that this trope is when a work showcases a surprising variety of food. It is not about when food has a variety of purposes, such as healing, replenishing mana, increasing stats, etc. They can overlap but this trope is just Loads And Loads Of Types Of Food (that is NOT a suggestion for a title, so please don't point out that it's terrible).

    With that in mind, I think a game that is specifically about cooking would be very hard to fit into this trope, since I wouldn't be "surprised" by having a wide variety of food.

    Almost any other game would fit, though, depending on the variety. If a puzzle game is based on candy and there are four distinct types of candy, that's not an example. But if there are twenty, with variations on each, that probably counts.

    Whether the food feeds your Hyperactive Metabolism or is just something you line up by color until it explodes, the variety in types seems to be the defining detail.
  • February 19, 2015
    SeaRover
    what I'm reading from the description is that this trope is when a work showcases a surprising variety of food.

    With that in mind, I think a game that is specifically about cooking would be very hard to fit into this trope, since I wouldn't be "surprised" by having a wide variety of food.

    Just modified the description. The variety doesn't necessarily have to be more than expected for the genre; it just has to be present and within a common purpose (or something like that).

    If a puzzle game is based on candy and there are four distinct types of candy, that's not an example. But if there are twenty, with variations on each, that probably counts.

    Exactly the principle I have on mind, though with candy in particular (as opposed to food in general).

    Whether the food feeds your Hyperactive Metabolism or is just something you line up by color until it explodes, the variety in types seems to be the defining detail.

    Exactly.
  • February 19, 2015
    SolipSchism
    What do you mean by "within a common purpose"?
  • February 19, 2015
    SeaRover
    I mean, whether they act as items for your inventory, point bonuses, stuff to present to others, or "pieces" (if you will) within a puzzle game.

    At this point, it has occurred to me to make a personal list of which kinds of games don't qualify by virtue of having too little variety, which I might just end up posting here for clarity. Also gonna have to analyze how Cloudy fails the "common purpose" criterion, which is part of the reason why this trope is exclusive to video games.

    EDIT: Now that I've come to realize, what I'm actually thinking of isn't so much about food, but about some broader, currently unnamed aesthetic, and this is just one form it could take. Said aesthetic, which I already attempted to describe in the quotes taken from my blog, actually could apply even outside video games, but is present mostly in that medium.

    Right now, I'm about to go to bed for tonight, but I will attempt to describe the concept and the situation better on my blog when I'm fresh tomorrow.
  • February 19, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ and what kind of aesthetic is that?
  • February 20, 2015
    SeaRover
    Okay. I've just described the whole situation in my blog, and brought it up with another friend of mine. Here is a link to the uncut blog entry:

    http://dmxrated.livejournal.com/558325.html

    As for what my friend has had to say:

    • Regarding Earthbound, the wide variety of food the game has to offer, despite lack of visual representations, makes the game more interactive. Being able to use condiments to improve the flavor and thus the effect goes even further towards that, and all of that is what makes its case of the trope more interesting.

    • As for everything else, food-related or otherwise, part of it has to do with me being autistic. The visuals in a game like Mother 3 are the type that affect me more than normal, because of all the cute, colorful designs and their kind of consistency. He compared this to why many grown men like "the colorful cutesy horsies" (despite FIM not being a game), I'd personally compare it to the Digimon franchise (at least regarding Baby-, In-Training-, and Rookie-level mons), and that would also explain my like for games like Super Mario World or Candy Crush Saga. (In short, some kind of balance between variety and consistency.)

    • And finally, he also explained that "Gourmet" normally refers to high quality and refined taste. I admitted that I was thinking of the Gourmet Race in Kirby Super Star when I applied the word, but this is exactly one more reason for another re-title.
  • February 20, 2015
    SolipSchism
    Well, I can't visit LJ from work, so I can't click the link, but based on what I'm seeing here... this is kind of getting wayyy too abstract for me to have a solid idea of what the trope is, if my description above isn't right.
  • February 20, 2015
    SeaRover
    Honestly, I'm starting to agree myself, and am actually considering dropping this. Haven't quite decided yet, though, and I will await any thoughts you might have once you read the blog entry.
  • February 20, 2015
    SolipSchism
    Not to be rude or dismissive, but I probably won't read it. Part of that is that I do pretty much all of my troping from work, and part of that is just flat-out laziness—if you want an opinion on it, it'd be best to wait for someone else to weigh in on that.
  • February 20, 2015
    DAN004
    Looking from your journal, I bet that that aesthetic is related to Weapons Kitchen Sink
  • February 21, 2015
    SeaRover
    Just wrote some more about it in a new entry this morning:

    http://dmxrated.livejournal.com/2015/02/21/

    At this point, I think this should just cover all media, no secondary criteria anymore, and have re-titled it accordingly. Personally, I have no more interest in running this, so up for grabs now.
  • February 21, 2015
    DAN004
    Not to be confused with leftover food in a kitchen sink.
  • February 23, 2015
    SolipSchism
    ^ Really doubt that would be a problem. "Kitchen sink" is an English-language euphemism for "a whole bunch of various stuff".
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