Created By: normp571 on April 5, 2013 Last Edited By: normp571 on January 25, 2014
Nuked

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Trope

Community Feedback Replies: 40
  • April 5, 2013
    Koveras
    Erm. Fire IS a physical phenomenon... Maybe you meant Solid Fire?
  • April 5, 2013
    normp571
    Yeah, I meant solid fire. Thanks Koveras.
  • April 5, 2013
    Larkmarn
    I think this is tropable, but I can't think of many concrete examples. Maybe expand it to energy weapons as well?

    Avatar The Last Airbender is the first one that comes to mind, fire clearly has concussive force.
  • April 5, 2013
    Koveras
    I don't have any solid examples, either...
  • April 5, 2013
    Larkmarn
    ... I see what you did there.
  • April 5, 2013
    normp571
    I added some examples.
  • April 5, 2013
    DunDun
    I'd love a description explaining how this is artistic license or something, since not everyone (including me) knows the Real Life properties of fire. Or how this trope is different than Real Life fire..........

    Especially since I thought fire has a push back when it rapidly expands - like, it pushes the surrounding air which explains the "concussionary force".........?
  • April 5, 2013
    normp571
    Explanation is up.
  • April 5, 2013
    Larkmarn
    ... is concussionary a word?
  • April 5, 2013
    normp571
    Larkman, oops it is concussive force....not concussionary
  • April 5, 2013
    MiinU
    The Avatar example is partially justified, since the effects of firebending are clearly shown to have semi-explosive properties, like in this scene (at 01:32-01:35) from The Legend of Korra, where the force one of her blasts sends Amon's troops flying without touching them.
  • April 5, 2013
    Ekuran
    How about Solid Energy? Or maybe Solid Fluids?
  • April 5, 2013
    Larkmarn
    ^^ That's not really a "justification" so much as an extension of this trope.
  • April 5, 2013
    normp571
    Miin U, exactly but that doesn't happen in real life.
  • April 5, 2013
    DunDun
    So fire in Real Life wouldn't push someone but move around and engulf them in heat, which would cause them to burst into flames?

    You might also want to connect this to Video Game Flamethrowers Suck or Aerosol Flamethrower or other fire-related tropes, all of which I am most certainly not knowledgeable of.

    I'm asking because if the description is too complicated or vague after it's launched, people will edit in examples that don't belong to this trope (or add justifications that don't hold up).
  • April 5, 2013
    MiinU
    ^^@normp571 - Not with fire on its own, no. But the force of an explosion (i.e. the accompanying shockwave), which is often accompanied by fire, or the ignition of the various chemicals, gases, etc. that fuel the explosion, yes. Which is what I meant by firebending having semi-explosive properties.
  • April 5, 2013
    normp571
    If anyone would like to help with the description by editing it be my guest. Also, @Miin U the shockwave is caused by the concussive force released by the explosion. I'm talking about the flames themselves having concussive force and being able to do things such as blasting through a concrete wall.
  • April 5, 2013
    MiinU
    ^normp571 - I know, I was agreeing with you; which is why I said fire lacks concussive force, of its own. Which is also the reason I used the links to illustrate what I meant when I said firebending had semi-explosive properties.
  • April 6, 2013
    Arivne
    Added Namespaces and italicization to OP example work names.
  • April 6, 2013
    normp571
    Thanks Arivne!
  • April 6, 2013
    undeadcupcake3
    I don't really know if this contributes to the argument(s) at all, but Blue Fire from Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is able to burn Red Ice, and you can trap Blue Fire in a bottle.
  • April 6, 2013
    normp571
    ^Hhhmmmm but is the fire "solid" per say
  • April 7, 2013
    normp571
    Haha we really need more examples!
  • April 7, 2013
    NateTheGreat
    In the Batman The Animated Series episode "If You're So Smart, Why Aren't You Rich?" the Riddler has robot griffins that can shoot fireballs from their mouths. Somehow they can blast holes in stone walls. Literally, blast. Couldn't the creators show them melting their way through?
  • April 7, 2013
    normp571
    ^LOL I love your little commentary I'll definitely be adding your example
  • April 8, 2013
    normp571
    More examples please!
  • April 10, 2013
    normp571
    Examples...
  • April 10, 2013
    normp571
  • April 12, 2013
    normp571
    ^srry whoever wrote that my intention was to copy and paste it onto the main thing
  • April 19, 2013
    normp571
    Someone help!
  • April 19, 2013
    DunDun
    Explain how this trope is related to the other tropes listed. "Compare Video Game Flamethrowers Suck, which is similar but [different in this way]; Playing With Fire, which is when [blah]"; etc.
  • April 20, 2013
    Arivne
    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons
      • (Fireball spell example)
      • Creatures from the Elemental Plane of Fire (such as fire elementals) are made of fire but are still solid. They can move objects, and other creatures and objects can't freely move through them.
  • April 22, 2013
    normp571
    Dun Dun, uhm, can you do that please?
  • April 27, 2013
    normp571
    So, anyone wanna give me some hats?
  • April 29, 2013
    DunDun
    "Contrast Video Game Flamethrowers Suck, which is when flamethrowers are portrayed as spraying pressurized gas rather than burning liquid; compare and contrast Hollywood Fire, which is another form of unrealistic fire--but instead of for the reasons above, it's due to the fire lacking proper heat and smoke."

    That help? I know I suggested VGFS a while back, but it might not really be similar enough for the contrast.
  • April 29, 2013
    1810072342
    We Have This I Swear. I think it was on the Rule Of Perception page, but I'm in a rush and I don't have time to dig it out right now.
  • July 6, 2013
    DAN004
    Add this to the description -

    One arguable reason for this is related to Rule Of Perception: As the trope Outrun The Fireball shows, in fiction, many people treat what can be directly seen in an explosion (i.e fire) as the most harmful thing and that said fire tend to knock people across distance, as well as making craters (when it's powerful enough), when in reality it's the concussive force of the explosion that did both.

    This trope may be justified if it's magic fire (controlled by someone who plays with them), lava, or burning napalm.
  • July 6, 2013
    DragonQuestZ
    Often fire can make a wall in some video games, as in you can't just pass through it (although you would take damage regardless), and putting it out is how you can advance.
  • July 6, 2013
    xanderiskander
    It's been awhile, but I recall it working this way for the fireflower power in mario bros.

    Video Games
    • The fireball projectiles you get from using the fireflower in the Super Mario Bros Franchise cause enemies to move backward away from you as if they were hit by something solid.
  • August 1, 2013
    normp571
    Bump
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=cb0w0a5anyg7hh0hhdtl5i8h