Created By: atheywa on February 9, 2012 Last Edited By: atheywa on February 11, 2012

Smart Sportsgirl

A girl who is not only skilled at sports but intelligent as well.

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Female athletes are generally portrayed as more competent than the typical male athlete. Possibly as a form of Positive Discrimination she's often portrayed as above average in terms of intelligence.

Her primary interest will be sports. Either school will be an occasionally mentioned second or it might be what she takes up when she matures. She's the Girl Next Door who's easy to talk to or play with since there's no pressure to be anything more than Just Friends.

If there's a contrast she's firmly the Tomboy in Tomboy and Girly Girl because of how independent she is. Unlike the Short Tank she has no interest at all in girlish trappings. Off the field she's more concerned with books than looks.

This girl has a mind as active as her body and isn’t afraid to speak it so think twice before you embarrass her or make sexual advances on her. She will try to protect little ones especially her children.

Unlike all examples of Genius Bruiser the Smart Sportsgirl isn't The Big Guy but just the Girl Next Door and unlike the Badass Bookworm she has a sporty look to her, not a smart one. Another trope of combining Brains and Brawn. Contrast Dumb Jock.

Examples:

  • Jess of Bridge to Terabithia thinks highly of Leslie Burke because she beat all the fifth grade boys in their race and she can impress teachers with her imaginative essays and ability to appear focused in class.
  • Basketball star Mary Camden from 7th Heaven will occasionally tutor other characters.
  • Samantha “Sam” Kepler from Wishbone participates in every sport her male friends do and is picked for her class team captain spelling bee because she's always reading.
  • The Dear America book With The Might of Angels has Dawnie who has the highest grades in the elementary division of her school but more than anything she wants to be part of the All-American Girls Baseball League.
  • Laura Ingalls Wilder from LittleHouseOnThePrairie will get dirty and play baseball as a child but at sixteen she becomes more elegant and gets her first teaching job.
  • Kristin Amanda “Kristy” Thomas from The Babysitters Club has the management skills to create the club and be it's president. Her sport is softball and she even starts a kids' team.
Community Feedback Replies: 12
  • February 9, 2012
    Psi001

    Since the trope revolves around excelling in areas of both brains and brawn, exagerrated examples risk bordering as into Mary Sue or Positive Discrimination territory.
  • February 9, 2012
    MiinU

    Video games

  • February 9, 2012
    atheywa
    That annoying squirrel? I don't think intelligent tomboy is the right thing to call her.

    I don't think Natsu Ayuhara works. Volleyball and swimming are both feminine sports. She doesn't sound like the kind of person who would have a big mouth or be especially easy to talk to or play with for the guys.
  • February 9, 2012
    MiinU
    ^@atheywa - According to the game, and her official character profile, Natsu is fairly easy to get along with for most people. The only exceptions are bullies, and when it comes to Shoma because he delibrately provokes her. Roberto even points this out when he tells Shoma she wouldn't be so hard on him if he was nicer to her and is also shown in the Gorin team's ending when she compliments Shoma until he passes by and provokes her again. Cue facepalm from Roberto.

    Natsu is also a tomboy. There's official art of her in kimonos but, for the most part, she's usually depicted in her uniform, or casual attire such as jeans. And while she's easy to get along with, she's known for having a quick temper; especially in regards to anyone who picks on her club members (or bullies in general), or whenever Shoma pisses her off. Otherwise, she's a combination of Cool Big Sis / Tall Dark And Bishoujo and most definitely a tomboy.

    It's all right there on her character page. Oh, and guys play volleyball to.
  • February 9, 2012
    atheywa
    Okay, can Natsu have something more specific said about her than performs well academically? A subject she helps her classmates with or impresses the teachers with... Also it would help if there's something aggressive, yet friendly, that can be said about her more than a couple of non-contact sports.
  • February 10, 2012
    MiinU
    ^@atheywa - Capcom never went into detail, they only mentioned that she does well in school. As far as helping schoolmates, however, they mentioned Natsu tutors her club members, and that they look up to her as a role model.

    Volleyball may not be a contact sport, in the traditional sense (but then, neither is baseball), but it's still physically demanding and injuries can occur just as easily as in any other sport.

    If that's not enough, during the end credits of the Play Station version, there's anime sequence of all the characters where she's shown spear fishing (0:22). She even shows off her catch while waving to the other students onshore.

    So: tomboy, captain of the school's volleyball team, fiercely protective of her club members, a Bully Hunter, and spear fishing = aggresive. At the same time, she's fairly easy to get along with (in most cases), is Cool Big Sis to her club members, makes good grades, and tutors in her spare time = friendly.

    Unless I'm missing something, she fits.
  • February 10, 2012
    Sackett
    Wait,what? Tomboys are divided between the Tomboy And Girly Girl? I don't think you understand that trope.

    The description needs a lot of work. There's a trope in there somewhere, but it seems like two or three tropes are being shoved together. Is being a Tomboy in other areas really essential to this character? If so, why? Or is it that being involved in sports makes her a tomboy? If the second, then discussion of other Tomboy traits should be left on the Tomboy page.

    Maybe we need an Athletic Girl trope to cover girls in sports and how that can sometimes be depicted as making her a Tomboy. Then have Smart Sportsgirl a subtrope of that.

    Which brings up another point, does being a girl and smart and athletic some how differ from a guy who is smart and athletic? If not then we probably don't need to separate them.

    Here are the steps I think should be taken:

    1: Create Academic Athlete page about athletes who defy the Dumb Jock stereotype. A subtrope of Brains And Brawn.

    2: Create Athletic Girl, which deserves a page separate from male athletes because girl athletes are depicted different. Discuss how an Athletic Girl is sometimes considered a Tomboy trait. Often Even The Girls Want Her (at least in anime). She's more likely to be an Academic Athlete then a guy.

    I also wouldn't bother with the discussion of other Tomboy traits on the Athletic Girl page, just link back to Tomboy and add Athletic Girl there as a common subtrope.

    3: Then stop and consider if Smart Sportsgirl examples are covered sufficiently by those two tropes. If not then create Smart Sportsgirl as a subtrope of Athletic Girl and Academic Athlete.
  • February 10, 2012
    atheywa
    If you want to work on the description I'll make it Up For Grabs. All I know is that there's a strong connection between the six characters I've listed in how they're female, play sports, and good in school.
  • February 10, 2012
    spudwalt
    How about Courtney Chetwynde in The Pendragon Adventure? She's introduced as Bobby's athletic rival (and long-time crush), and further events prove she's not stupid, either.
  • February 11, 2012
    atheywa
    I've made some edits so hopefully it works better now. I specified that she has above average intelligence. I also said that she has no interest at all in girlish trappings because I don't think it's possible for this to overlap with Short Tank.
  • February 11, 2012
    Sackett
    My criticism is more than just the description.

    I'm suggesting that your trope structure is wrong. You have 6 examples, but are they 6 examples of one trope? Or 6 examples of two tropes that overlap in the case of those 6 examples?

    We don't have the supertropes, so are seeking to make a subtrope to cover those 6 examples. I'm suggesting that we need to create a the supertropes first. Then we can better determine if there is another subtrope in here or not.
  • February 11, 2012
    Sackett
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=c6zsku5c185mpc94t8vodqha