Created By: TorchicBlaziken on November 10, 2010 Last Edited By: CrypticMirror on December 22, 2010
Troped

Jeez, Who's Jesus?

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Trope
The inverse of Hold Your Hippogriffs and Oh My Gods!, it's when someone uses an expression which could not possibly have come into use, due to Speculative Fiction history preventing the etymology from taking place. "Jeez" or variants are the most commonly seen words which invoke this trope. In fact, when Hold Your Hippogriffs or Oh My Gods! are used, it's to defy this trope.

Another variant of this trope is used for humor, such as yelling out "Jesus" in front of the real Jesus, who will usually assume that He is being addressed.

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Examples

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[[folder:Anime]]
  • In the English dub of InuYasha there's an episode where he remarks, "we've all got our own cross to bear." This is set before Christianity was introduced to Japan.
  • Fullmetal Alchemist. As far as is shown, there's nothing like a benevolent monotheist deity- there's the jerkass god Truth and Father, whose kind of like Satan. However, Greed does a See You in Hell to his family and Buccaneer references Fluffy Cloud Heaven.
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[[folder:Comics]]
  • A translation-created problem in the Spanish version of an Astérix comic book: a character sneezes, Asterix says "Bless you!" - which in this context is translated to Spanish as "Jesus!". Raising the question for Spanish readers of how could Asterix say that in the year 50 B.C.
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[[folder:Film]]
  • History of the World Part I, Comicus says "Jesus" in exasperation during The Last Supper, causing Jesus to answer, "Yes?" assuming that he was addressing him.
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[[folder:Literature]]
  • One of the earlier Discworld books references gypsies, which is kind of a problem, since there's no Egypt in the universe to derive that name- the equivalent is called Djelibeybi. So, if there are Roma on the Disc, they should probably be nicknamed Jelibeybs or something like that.
  • In the Dragonriders of Pern series, Pernese still say "jays" and "by all that's holy" despite having Outgrown Such Silly Superstitions.
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[[folder:Live-Action TV]]
  • Thanks to Throw It In, Battlestar Galactica's Colonel Tigh exclaims "Jesus!" in a polytheistic society that's never heard of and predates Abrahamic religions.
  • Dinosaurs uses the B.C. timeline. Lampshaded in the first episode when Robbie asks why the dates go backwards. "I mean, what are we counting down for? What are we waiting for?"
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[[folder:Video Games]]
  • Falco rather infamously sarcastically calls Fox "Einstein" if you shoot him in Star Fox 64. When a reader of Nintendo Power magazine sent in a letter questioning how could a being from another galaxy know about Einstein, their response was "Because the game's creators are from this galaxy, Einstein."
    • Falco not only says "Einstein", but also "Jeez Laweez, what's that?". He really loves this trope.
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[[folder:Web Comics]] [[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
  • In the animated The Return of the King, Samwise's response to Gollum's final attack is a very animated "Gooood help us!"
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Community Feedback Replies: 33
  • November 11, 2010
    Arutema
    Thanks to Throw It In, Battlestar Galactica's Colonel Tigh exclaims "Jesus!" in a polytheistic society that's never heard of Abrahamic religions.
  • November 11, 2010
    AlexRandom
    A translation-created problem in the Spanish version of an Asterix comic book: a character sneezes, Asterix says "Bless you!" - which in this context is translated to Spanish as "Jesus!". Raising the question for Spanish readers of how could Asterix say that in the year 50 B.C.
  • November 11, 2010
    Gnoman
    A related trope is swearing in a way that shouldn't be swearing at all in that culture. I can't remember the title, but I recall a scifi story where sex was so free and common to almost count as conversation, but when characters swore, they used the same sexual swears we do.
  • December 6, 2010
    Generality
    A common variant is to have someone use the name Jesus in the modern, expletive way, in front of the actual Jesus, who is confused by the abuse of his name. Used this way in History Of The World Part One and less anachronistically in South Park.
  • December 6, 2010
    batgirl1
    Swearing aside, does it count when aliens on other planets experience earth-quakes?
  • December 6, 2010
    berr
    In the animated The Return Of The King, Samwise's response to Gollum's final attack is a very animated "Gooood help us!"
  • December 6, 2010
    PaulA
    "Earthquake" and "God" could both just be Translation Convention -- aliens probably have a word that means "earthquake", and most cultures have a word that means "god". It's when they invoke the name of a specific person that it starts getting dodgy.
  • December 6, 2010
    Dacilriel
    I'm not sure what the dialogue was in Japanese, but in the English dub of Inu Yasha there's an episode where he remarks, "we've all got our own cross to bear." This is set before Christianity was introduced to Japan.
  • December 7, 2010
    NativeJovian
    Falco rather infamously sarcastically calls Fox "Einstein" if you shoot him in Star Fox 64.
  • December 7, 2010
    RainyDayNinja
    For the name, I suggest Orphaned Etymology
  • December 7, 2010
    Tulling
    Something similar occurs when a Fantasy Counterpart Culture includes names taken from a real-world culture that does not have a counterpart in the fiction. In Warhammer Fantasy, Imperial characters usually have German names. Some of them have Biblical names ultimately derived from Hebrew, like Michael or Johann, even though there is no Christianity in the setting and no counterpart to Hebrews.
  • December 7, 2010
    Jordan
    One of the earlier Discworld books references gypsies, which is kind of a problem, since there's no Egypt in the universe to derive that name- the equivalent is called Djelibeybi. So, if there are Roma on the Disc, they should probably be nicknamed Jelibeybs or something like that.

    Something that struck me about Fullmetal Alchemist. As far as is shown, there's nothing like a benevolent monotheist deity- there's the jerkass god Truth and Father, whose kind of like Satan. However, Greed does a See You In Hell to his family and Buccaneer references Fluffy Cloud Heaven.
  • December 7, 2010
    ayjazz1
    I also vote for expanding this trope to include misplaced names in a fantasy culture, and for the name Orphaned Etymology.
  • December 7, 2010
    TooBah
    Han Solo also tells someone, "Then I'll see you in Hell" in The Empire Strikes Back, a much more specific reference to the place.
  • December 7, 2010
    TonyG
    Dinosaurs uses the B.C. timeline. Lampshaded in the first episode when Robbie asks why the dates go backwards. "I mean, what are we counting down for? What are we waiting for?"
  • December 7, 2010
    Prfnoff
    In the Dragonriders Of Pern series, Pernese still say "jays" and "by all that's holy" despite having Outgrown Such Silly Superstitions.
  • December 7, 2010
    helterskelter
    I have my doubts the Star Wars example is a real example--hell is not limited to Christianity. It is a noun to describe a place of punishment people go when they die. Many, many religions have a similar concept. Them shouting "what the hell" isn't an example, nor is almost any use of saying "hell".
  • December 8, 2010
    PaulA
    I've seen it pointed out somewhere on this very wiki that some of the Star Wars Expanded Universe material makes a point of mentioning that the dominant religion on Han's home planet includes a concept of hell.
  • December 8, 2010
    ayjazz1
    In that case, I'll remove it.
  • December 8, 2010
    Augustine
    In the Warhammer 40,000 novels, explanations of shock are usually something along the lines of "Sweet Emperor!" or "Golden Throne!".
  • December 8, 2010
    helterskelter
  • December 8, 2010
    RainyDayNinja
    Yeah, those Warhammer examples are the exact opposite of this trope. Instead of Hold Your Hippogriffs, where figures of speech are changed to reflect the fantasy culture, this trope is where they aren't changed, even though they should be.
  • December 8, 2010
    batgirl1
    Casting my vote for Orphaned Etymology! =D
  • December 8, 2010
    LeeM
    The Return of the King example is faintly borderline. IIRC Tolkien does mention Eru, the One, in LOTR (although His other name, Iluvatar, doesn't show up until The Silmarillion). But yeah, folks aren't in the habit of routinely invoking Him, in vain or not.
  • December 8, 2010
    TheChainMan
    Falco not only says "Einstein", but also "Jeez Laweez, what's that?". He really loves this trope.
  • December 9, 2010
    aurora369
    The second version happens in The Master And Margarita. A minor character says "Hell take me!" as an expletive. The demons who were passing by do exactly that.
  • December 9, 2010
    ayjazz1
    Like said before, hell is not exclusive to a Western Christian audience. It seems to be a universal concept throughout religion.
  • December 14, 2010
    CrypticMirror
    In Exiern, High Fantasy world with no relation to earth much less Japan apparently has Yaoi Porn, mentioned by name.
  • December 18, 2010
    PaulA
    ^ Since it's another world with no relation to earth much less Japan -- or, say, England -- presumably they're not really speaking English. Thus, one could reasonably assume that they actually use some other name for the subject at hand, which is translated as "yaoi" for the convenience of the reader, just as every other word in their conversation is translated for the convenience of the reader.

    Or are you asserting that yaoi porn is so culturally-specific that, of all the countries in all possible worlds, Japan is the only one in which it could exist?
  • December 18, 2010
    CrypticMirror
    your argument of translation convention could apply to all the other examples here too.
  • December 22, 2010
    CrypticMirror
    The 1980 Flash Gordon movie has the war rocket Ajax. Why a Mongo-ian warship is named after a hero from Ancient Greek Mythology is unknown.
  • December 22, 2010
    Evalana
    • In the Veggie Tales DVD "Saint Nicholas: A Story of Joyful Giving", Octavius tells young Nicholas, "What most people saw from your father was just the tip of the iceberg." But since they live in Greece, Nicholas asks, "What's an iceberg?" "I have no idea," Octavius admits.
  • December 22, 2010
    shedemei
    Family Guy does this for humor when God accidentally sets a woman with whom he was flirting on fire. He shouts in horror "Jesus Christ!" and Jesus of Nazareth immediately shows up, crying "What?" in alarm.
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