Created By: JonnyB on June 20, 2011 Last Edited By: JonnyB on September 11, 2011
Troped

Incessant Music Madness

When someone singing or playing a musical instrument drives another mad.

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STOP!
This is when someone is singing or playing a musical instrument or a drum, and WILL. NOT. SHUT. UP., and it finally makes another character yell for him to stop or just start screaming insanely, or lash out in some way. It doesn't necessarily have to be bad music (though it often is), it's just that it's incessant (or sometimes just in a style the hearer just can't stand to hear) and goes beyond the hearer's point of enduring, and to them it becomes like Nails on a Blackboard and they just want it to end. The "madness" is usually figurative and temporary, but can occasionally be literal and permanent.

Related to Big "SHUT UP!" (which is often the outcome). Also related to Dreadful Musician. Could be a case of The Thing That Would Not Leave if this happens inside a persons house. Compare Brown Note, which is a related trope. (The difference? This trope is when the music is not harmful itself but irritates you to madness; Brown Note is when the music is inherently harmful.) Also compare Loud of War, which is this trope done maliciously. Also compare Hell is That Noise. Not to be confused with Ear Worm.


Examples:

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  • In the Cheetos commercial, "Piano", a girl and Chester the Cheetos cheetah are repeatedly playing just the beginning of the song "Chopsticks", over and over. Finally, a guy in the foreground has had enough and says, "Don't you two know anything else?" The girl and Chester look annoyed, then start playing it again - one octave higher.

Anime and Manga
  • In Darker Than Black, Hei's downstairs neighbors practice for their band into the wee hours of nonstop. Averted, in that this never bothered him, either due to his zen-like calm, or the fact that he's generally never home. Un-averted, when he has Kenji Sakurai as a guest, and he complains about the noise.

Comic Books

Film
  • Brave Sir Robin's Minstrels in Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
  • Animal House. At the toga party, some guy is playing a guitar and singing when Bluto happens by. After listening to the singing for a while, Bluto takes the guitar away from the guy and smashes it to pieces against a wall. Watch it here.
  • It's a Wonderful Life: When George returns home after discovering that Billy misplaced the deposit money, he begins to mentally unravel while Janie can be heard practicing Hark the Herald Angels Sing on the piano. Eventually, he snaps and shouts, "Haven't you learned that silly tune yet? You've been playing it over and over! Now stop it! Stop it!!"
  • Who Framed Roger Rabbit: the director is arguing with Roger after he blows his lines when he finally shouts, "Can we lose the playback please!?"
  • The villain in The Driller Killer was driven homicidally insane partly due to his wannabe rock star neighbors never shutting up.
  • In the Australian indie film Samson and Delilah, the main character's brother is in a band. As they are living on an Aboriginal compound in the middle of the bush, they pretty much don't do anything but play music all day, right outside Samson's bedroom, and throughout the movie every time we hear them play it is the exact same song. Mid-way through the movie, Samson gets so sick of listening to it that he attacks them, smashing their instruments.
  • In The Smurfs, Patrick Winslow is driven crazy by the Smurfs constantly singing their theme tune.
  • In Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, some of the kids have run off. The other kids are showing Max which direction they went, and are chanting a lament in the background. Eventually, Max yells, "Stop the noise, STOP THE NOISE!"
  • In Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Prince John calls for the knights to stop Robin and his men. About 50 men in suits of armor start marching into the room from all sides, the clanging of their armor getting louder and louder and louder. After several minutes of this, Prince John, who has taken refuge under a table and is holding his ears, says, "I hope this is worth THE NOISE!!!"
  • In the film Rocket Man, the protagonist and his rival for the astronaut position are both placed in isolation chambers for psychological testing. However, the two chambers aren't isolated enough, so the test subjects can hear each other. The protagonist passes the time by singing "John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" for several hours, pushing the other guy to the brink.

Jokes
  • A tourist visiting deepest Africa becomes ever more maddened by the incessant sound of native drums, about which the natives will only ever say "Very bad when drumming stops!" About to completely lose it, he finally forces one of them to tell him what happens when the drumming stops. The native replies: "bass solo."

Literature
  • Not playing an instrument exactly, but in Songs of the Humpback Whale by Jodi Picoult, one of the main characters is a scientist who studies, well, whale songs. For a while he plays recordings of them at home all the time, until he catches his wife attacking the stereo with a knife because she can't stand to listen to them anymore.

Live-Action TV
  • In the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Qpid", Q turned the bridge crew into Robin Hood and his merry men. Geordie became the Alan a-Dale analog, and kept plucking annoyingly at a lute. Finally Worf had had enough, walked up, snatched the lute and smashed it against a tree (in an homage to the Animal House example above).
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus, the Cheese Shop sketch. When John Cleese's character enters there are some guys playing Greek music and dancing. After several minutes of the annoying music in the background he turns around and yells "Will you shut that bloody dancing up!" and they stop playing.
    • Also happens in the Spam sketch.
  • One CSI case involved a garotted musician. Turned out he was killed by an angry neighbour who couldn't stand the noise.
  • In the M*A*S*H episode "The Smell of Music", Winchester's french horn aggravates BJ and Hawkeye such that they refuse to bathe until he gives it up.
  • Norton often did this in The Honeymooners, prompting Ralph to finally yell at him to stop.
  • In season 7 of Curb Your Enthusiasm, Sammy sings in the shower as Larry's trying to sleep, prompting an extremely agitated outburst. 'SHUT THE FUCK UP!'
    • Cheri Oteri's appearance on Curb Your Enthusiasm was as a mentally unstable nanny who was driven mad by constantly hearing the Looney Tunes theme working at an amusement park. She sings it constantly and it drives her into a murderous rage.
  • "The Song That Never Ends" from Lamb Chop and Friends drives Sheri Lewis mad.
  • In the BBC comedy show, Not the Nine O'Clock News, Gryff-Rhys Jones played a colonial planter, driven to drink by the noise of the jungle, who staggers drunkenly onto the verandah and demands "Will you shut up! Will this damn noise never end!" The camera pans back, revealing that what we have taken to be the chittering of night insect noise is really thirty or forty natives, each of whom is playing with a Rubiks Cube...

Music

Web Comic

Web Original
  • During ProtonJonSA's Let's Play of Super Kaizo World, he hears the "Time's Running Out" alarm so many times after reloading save states at the very beginning of the level that he eventually pleads for it to stop. He later adds, "I'm not sleeping tonight, guys. This is my nightmare sound."

Western Animation
  • The Bugs Bunny cartoon "Long-Haired Hare" begins with Bugs playing various instruments and singing while an opera singer is trying to rehearse, leading the opera singer to smash his instruments and beat him up.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants, "Jellyfish Jam". SpongeBob and a jellyfish keep Squidward up all night playing loud music. When more jellyfish show up and play the music even louder, Squidward has had enough and counterattacks by playing his clarinet. This angers the jellyfish, and when SpongeBob's pleas to stop result in Squidward playing even louder, the jellyfish go over to Squidward's and sting him.
  • In early seasons of The Simpsons one of Homer's catchphrases was "Will you cut out that infernal racket?!" directed at Lisa rehearsing her sax. In the episode where he thinks he's dying from having poisonous sushi he goes to her room as she's playing. "Hi Dad. Want me to cut out this infernal racket?"
  • In an episode of The Flintstones, Fred and Wilma find the perfect maid/cook, and everybody's happy--except that Fred keeps singing (badly) an inane song he made up. The hired help finally quits.
    Fred: Oh, Lola Brigada/Your food I dig-ada!
  • On Arthur Arthur's little sister DW likes the song "Crazy Bus," which drives Arthur crazy. Everyone else his age enjoys it too, but not as incessantly as DW.
  • Histeria! had a Civil War skit accompanied by violin music - eventually the soldier started complaining about the music and wound up eating his own head so he wouldn't have to hear it (Played for Laughs).

Real Life
  • Bagpipes, for many. YMMV. (They were used by armies for just that reason, another example of this trope being weaponized.)
  • Yodeling, for many. (Also weaponized in Mars Attacks!, but for the Martians it was more of a Brown Note.)

Community Feedback Replies: 80
  • June 20, 2011
    Madeira
    Can actual madness result? There's an H.P. Lovecraft story The Music of Erich Zann which has it. There's also an early merry melodies cartoon where there are a bunch of animals performing in a school talent show and one of them is so bad it's this.
  • June 20, 2011
    PaulA
    The Bugs Bunny cartoon "Long-Haired Hare" begins with Bugs playing various instruments and singing while an opera singer is trying to rehearse, leading the opera singer to smash his instruments and beat him up.
  • June 20, 2011
    JonnyB
    That caused me to remember another one. And I suppose it doesn't always have to end with a loud scream, as long as the person is irritated to the point of doing something rash, a passive-aggressive response works too. In one Star Trek The Next Generation episode, Q turned the bridge crew into Robin Hood and his merry men. Geordie became the Alan a-Dale analog, and kept plucking annoyingly at a lute. Finally Worf had had enough, walked up, snatched the lute and smashed it against a tree.
  • June 20, 2011
    Madeira
    Oh also a literary example: "Overhead the moon is screaming" from John Bellairs' Face In The Frost and Brave Sir Robin's Minstrel in Monty Python and The Holy Grail
  • June 20, 2011
    JonnyB
    Can you give me more context of the Face in the Frost example? Sir Robin's Minstrels work, as they won't shut up and are driving him crazy with their singing.
  • June 21, 2011
    Arivne
    Film
    • Animal House. At the toga party, some guy is playing a guitar and singing when Bluto happens by. After listening to the singing for a while, Bluto takes the guitar away from the guy and smashes it to pieces against a wall. Watch it here.

    Live Action TV
    • Monty Pythons Flying Circus, the Cheese Shop sketch. When John Cleese's character enters there are some guys playing foreign (Greek?) music and dancing. After several minutes of the annoying music in the background he turns around and yells "Will you shut that bloody dancing up!" and they stop playing.
  • June 21, 2011
    Oreochan
    Related to Dreadful Musician, however that trope is often done unintentionally.
  • June 21, 2011
    JonnyB
    Madeira, did the music drive someone mad, in the Lovecraft example?
  • June 21, 2011
    Loogaroo
    Film
    • Its A Wonderful Life: When George returns home after discovering that Billy misplaced the deposit money, he begins to mentally unravel while Janie can be heard practicing Hark the Herald Angels Sing on the piano. Eventually, he snaps and shouts, "Haven't you learned that silly tune yet? You've been playing it over and over! Now stop it! Stop it!!"

    Web Original
    • During ProtonJonSA's Let's Play of Super Kaizo World, he hears the "Time's Running Out" alarm so many times after reloading save states at the very beginning of the level that he eventually pleads for it to stop. He later adds, "I'm not sleeping tonight, guys. This is my nightmare sound."
  • June 21, 2011
    ParadiscaCorbasi
    Troper Tales: I was at a comic shop for an appearance of an artist friend. The store had a Bagman video game which played a midi version of "turkey in the straw". After 10 hours with that as backgroundmusic, the running gag was that all of us in the store would Freak Out and go Axe Crazy anytime we heard the song thereafter. Not quite, but I know the song does make me a little twitchy.
  • June 21, 2011
    Madeira
    Oh and the Bard from Astrix and Obelix
  • June 21, 2011
    TonyG
    • SpongeBob SquarePants, "Jellyfish Jam". SpongeBob and a jellyfish keep Squidward up all night playing loud music. When more jellyfish show up and play the music even louder, Squidward has had enough and counterattacks by playing his clarinet. This angers the jellyfish, and when SpongeBob's pleas to stop result in Squidward playing even louder, the jellyfish go over to Squidward's and sting him.
    • Who Framed Roger Rabbit: the director is arguing with Roger after he blows his lines when he finally shouts, "Can we lose the playback please!?"
  • June 21, 2011
    Mozgwsloiku
    One CSI case involved a garotted musician turned out he was killed by an angry neighbour who couldn't stand the noise
  • June 21, 2011
    randomsurfer
    In early seasons of The Simpsons one of Homer's catchphrases was "Will you cut out that infernal racket?!" directed at Lisa rehearsing her sax. In the episode where he thinks he's dying from having poisonous sushi he goes to her room as she's playing. "Hi Dad. Want me to cut out this infernal racket?"
  • June 21, 2011
    bluepenguin
    Not playing an instrument exactly, but in Songs of the Humpback Whale by Jodi Picoult, one of the main characters is a scientist who studies, well, whale songs. For a while he plays recordings of them at home all the time, until he catches his wife attacking the stereo with a knife because she can't stand to listen to them anymore.
  • June 22, 2011
    Arivne
    It looks like we have two types here:

    • 1. The music/singing is so bad that listening to even a little of it will drive you crazy.
    • 2. The music/singing isn't so bad, but listening to it over and over again for a long period will eventually get on your nerves.
  • June 22, 2011
    TooBah
    To clarify The Flintstones example: Fred and Wilma find the perfect maid/cook, and everybody's happy--except that Fred keeps singing (badly) an inane song he made up. The hired help finally quits.
    Fred: Oh, Lola Brigada/Your food I dig-ada
  • June 22, 2011
    32_Footsteps
    I beg everyone's pardon, but I'm failing to see the difference between this and Brown Note.
  • June 22, 2011
    JonnyB
    This might be a subtrope of that, I don't know. But that seems to be a note or song that has an affect on anyone that hears it... this can be any song or singing that ordinarily would be innocuous, but is continued on or repeated over and over, or done very badly (often intentionally, to be annoying) to the point where someone can no longer tolerate hearing it.
  • June 22, 2011
    LordCrayak
    The villain in The Driller Killer was driven homicidally insane partly due to his wannabe rock star neighbors never shutting up.
  • June 22, 2011
    JonnyB
    To give some clarification for 32_Footsteps: The Flintstones example, for instance. If Fred had sung the song once, or twice, everyone would have just said, "God, that was horrible." But he wouldn't shut up, he just kept going on and on and on with it, literally ad nauseum, until the hired help couldn't stand any more of it. In the Babylon 5 example, Marcus was actually a fairly decent singer. But Dr. Franklin was already annoyed, and Marcus was just doing it "for the lulz" to increase the annoyance; apparently Marcus seems to have started over (at least once) past the commercial break... it sounds like by that time even the production crew wanted him to shut up.

    @Arivne: You could be right. Although I don't think your #1 is quite right, I think that while the music may be incredibly bad, it's the fact that it just continues on past a person's point of enduring it that's the real point (as I pointed out in my Fred Flintstone example above).
  • June 22, 2011
    ZarbiNerada
    Not to be confused with Ear Worm.
  • June 22, 2011
    randomsurfer
    • In one episode of Family Guy Peter gets obsessed with the song "Surfin' Bird" and plays/sings it nonstop. In a later episode Peter has gotten amnesia, and then discovers this great new song: Surfin' Bird.
    • On Arthur Arthur's little sister DW likes the song "Crazy Bus," which drives Arthur crazy. Everyone else his age enjoys it too, but not as incessantly as DW.
  • June 22, 2011
    TheMayorofNorthfield
    • In the MASH episode "The Smell of Music", Winchester's french horn aggravates BJ and Hawkeye such that they refuse to bathe until he gives it up.

  • June 22, 2011
    JonnyB
    That would definitely qualify as passive-aggressive, lol.
  • June 23, 2011
    Arivne
    ^^^^^ Jonny B: I just re-read the description and you're correct. The description is clearly Type 2, but the Laconic doesn't mention the "repeated incessantly" part so you got some Type 1 examples (including my Animal House one).

    Suggestion: change the Laconic to "Someone singing or playing the same song/music over and over again drives another mad." and delete all examples that don't fit.
  • June 26, 2011
    JonnyB
    Been busy... I'll look it over and see if it needs some adjusting.
  • June 28, 2011
    FastEddie
    Title is a line of dialog. Name the trope, don't parrot some line of dialog.
  • June 28, 2011
    JonnyB
    I'm open to suggestions.
  • June 29, 2011
    Arivne
  • June 30, 2011
    Arivne
    Film
    • Ghost. Sam Wheat has been murdered and returned as a ghost. He desperately needs for Oda Mae Brown (who is the only person who can hear him) to speak to other people for him. When she refuses, he sings the song "I'm Henery the Eighth, I Am" to her over and over again until she can't take it any more and gives in.
  • June 30, 2011
    ClockStopping
    • In the Australian indie film Samson and Delilah, the main character's brother is in a band. As they are living on an Aboriginal compound in the middle of the bush, they pretty much don't do anything but play music all day, right outside Samson's bedroom, and throughout the movie every time we hear them play it is the exact same song. Mid-way through the movie, Samson gets so sick of listening to it that he attacks them, smashing their instruments.
  • June 30, 2011
    ButterKit
    Another film example with a ghost, in Just Like Heaven Elizabeth is functionally a ghost (whether she knows it at this point I can't recall) and is singing inceasently to get David to stop ignoring her.

    Also, once this has a good title, it deserves a hat! How about Incessant Music Makes You Mad, for the fact that "mad" can be used to characterize an angry reaction as well as the fact that the music is driving the character crazy.
  • June 30, 2011
    hevendor717
    Horribly Invoked in Real Life- American soldiers have been known to do this to deprive enemy detainees of sleep and sanity in recent military conflicts.

    http://motherjones.com/politics/2008/02/torture-playlist

  • June 30, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Real Life: In order to get Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega to surrender, US troops blasted his location (the Vatican embassy) with...Barry Manilow tunes.
  • June 30, 2011
    dollink
    In Girl Genius, Castle Heterodyne has a torture room that apparently plays music. Few people can actually hear it, though, it seems.
  • July 1, 2011
    JonnyB
    If they can't hear it, then how is it this trope?
  • July 1, 2011
    Andygal
    One of Mercedes Lackey's Serrated Edge books has a captured hero drive his telepathic jailers insane by mentally singing They Might Be Giants songs.
  • July 1, 2011
    BrightBlueInk
    There's a flash cartoon where a character hears "Bananaphone" played constantly in his head (and nobody else can hear it). Eventually he's literally driven insane by the song, curled up in a fetal position in the corner, and after an extended period starts to bleed from the eyes and dies. Then his roommate touches his body and starts hearing it, too...
  • July 1, 2011
    JonnyB
    Going back to Arivne's types... type 1 would seem to be more Brown Note. I'll have to go through the trope and cull those out.

    As for the detainee "torture" example, I'm not sure that qualifies. Also uncomfortable with the definition of it as "torture."
  • July 1, 2011
    Bisected8
    An old joke about bagpipes goes; Baseball bats are for Americans. An Englishman should defend his home with a cricket bat and a Scottsman should play the bagpipes to repel intruders.
  • July 2, 2011
    Speedball
    Another Star Trek The Next Generation example: in "The Survivors," Deanna Troi is unexpectedly hit with music that won't leave her mind and drives her insane, specifically so she won't be able to use her mind-reading powers on the local Physical God.
  • July 2, 2011
    Stindris
    This needs a more solid deffinition before it's shipped. For example, in 1408 (film version), the song 'It's only just begun' plays, and Horror Insues. Would this be counted, as the it is only one of many things that cause the main character to go mad? Or does music have to be the primary reason for insanity? Otherwise, this is looking very good.

  • In the "King Ramses" episode of Courage The Cowardly Dog, one of Ramses' three plagues is incessant music. "RAAAAAMSES! THE MAN IN GAUZE! THE MAN IN GAUZE!" It works pretty well to drive Courage and his family up the wall.
  • July 2, 2011
    dollink
    At Jonny B's reply to my comment: because I totally failed at reading the description. -headdesk- Sorry. I don't think sometimes. I think I was facepalming too much as a kid or something.
  • July 2, 2011
    JonnyB
    Actually, I might be able to fit it in as an aversion. They set it up to be this trope, and it failed.
  • July 3, 2011
    IronLion
    ^^^^^^^ The use of music to torture prisoners is an example of Loud Of War. And yes, it most certainly does qualify as torture.
  • July 12, 2011
    JonnyB
  • July 29, 2011
    Oreochan
    Bump
  • August 2, 2011
    VicGeorge2010
    Film
    • In The Smurfs, Patrick Winslow is driven crazy by the Smurfs constantly singing their theme tune.
  • August 3, 2011
    benjamminsam
    In season 7 of Curb Your Enthusiasm, Sammy sings in the shower as Larry's trying to sleep, prompting an extremely agitated outburst. 'SHUT THE FUCK UP!'
  • August 3, 2011
    Rotel
    "The song that never ends"?
  • August 3, 2011
    JonnyB
    ^ From??
  • August 3, 2011
    benjamminsam
    ^ Lamb Chop And Friends. "Charlie Horse don't you slam that... door."
  • August 4, 2011
    wordswords
    Could be a case of The Thing That Would Not Leave if this happens inside a persons house.
  • August 4, 2011
    PS3D
    Can easily imagine Troper Tales for this one.
  • August 4, 2011
    ScanVisor
    PHOEBE FROM FREINDS: Pretty much every episode she plays guitar is something akin to this.
  • August 4, 2011
    dotchan
    Related trope: Ear Worm.
  • August 5, 2011
    Bishop22
    You defeat the final boss of Mother (Earthbound Zero) by singing.
  • August 6, 2011
    JonnyB
    I'll try to get to cleaning this thing up sometime this weekend. In the meantime, I found another relevant one:

    In the comic book "Spike vs. Dracula" #5, Spike threatens to haunt Dracula with an endless singing of "I'm Henery the Eighth, I Am".
  • August 8, 2011
    benjamminsam
    Cheri Oteri's appearance on Curb Your Enthusiasm was as a mentally unstable nanny who was driven mad by constantly hearing the Looney Tunes theme working at an amusement park. She sings it constantly and it drives her into a murderous rage.
  • August 8, 2011
    DragonRanger
  • August 9, 2011
    JonnyB
    Ok I've gone through and added most of the ones since the last time I looked the trope over. So far I think the Cacophonix example and the Lovecraft example are the only ones that might be "Type 1" and therefore Brown Notes, and should possibly be removed. Let me know what the rest of you guys think, if there are any others.

    There's also a few other examples that might get folded into this trope from another YKTTW about incessant drums driving people mad, which is essentially the same thing.
  • August 9, 2011
    BFisch
    Idea for page quote: "Second verse - Same as the first!" -"I'm Henery the Eighth, I Am" (the Herman's Hermits version)
  • August 13, 2011
    Bruxist
    Vampire The Masquerade has Daughters of Cacophony - vampires who have the power of song (sounds ridiculous, I know). It's rumored that a certain Daughter managed to drive away a hostile vampire warband with her song; another time, she went with a friendly Gangrel Primogen to howl at the moon, and the Primogen went mad from the experience.
  • August 17, 2011
    JonnyB
    I'm not sure if Phoebe from Friends is type 1 (not this trope) or type 2, as I've never seen the show. Anyone care to elaborate?

    I've also added a clarification between this trope and Brown Note in the description.

    I'm going to edit out some of the examples again because some of them overlap with Brown Note and Loud Of War. I've made notations above as to which ones I am considering moving. Discuss please. (It's still a healthy trope without them; indeed, it strengthens all three and shows the relationship between the three tropes better, I think.)
  • August 17, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Frankly I don't think Phoebe from Friends counts in any of these. Sure her music is bad, but it's not so bad it drives people crazy.

    In the Monty Python example: it is indeed Greek music. One man is playing the bouzouki while two others do a Greek dance to it. (In Greek dancing as seen in the West, men dance with each other.)
  • August 17, 2011
    raigakuren
    The Prismriver Sisters from Touhou Project. Lunasa's playing causes depression. Merlin's uplifts the soul. Lyrica's music is the only one's who has no effect on those listening to it.
  • August 22, 2011
    JonnyB
    bump

    raigakuren, I'm not sure those fit, they sound more like Brown Note, at least Lunasa does.
  • August 22, 2011
    CommanderPanda
    • In Darker Than Black, Hei's downstairs neighbors practice for their band into the wee hours of nonstop. Averted, in that this never bothered him, either due to his zen-like calm, or the fact that he's generally never home. Un-averted, when he has Kenji Sakurai as a guest, and he complains about the noise.
  • August 23, 2011
    redvelvetmock
    In Real Life, there's "The song that never ends, yes it goes on and on, my friends. Some people started singing it, not knowing what it was, and then they went on singing it forever just because-" You get the idea.

    Also, "I Know a Song that Gets on Everybody's Nerves" invokes this trope.
  • August 23, 2011
    MetaFour
    • In the film Film.Rocket Man, the protagonist and his rival for the astronaut position are both placed in isolation chambers for psychological testing. However, the two chambers aren't isolated enough, so the test subjects can hear each other. The protagonist passes the time by singing "John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt" for several hours, pushing the other guy to the brink.
  • August 29, 2011
    terrafox
    Another Family Guy example:
    • Stewie drives fat people crazy by following them around with a tuba.
  • August 29, 2011
    Medinoc
    • In a French live-action short, one man is driven man because everywhere he goes, there's someone or something singing, whistling or playing Ah! le petit vin blanc. He ends up killing a hobo who was singing it, and tries to dispose of the body by cutting it up and tossing each part in a hand-cranked meat grinder... At which points the grinder starts emitting that fateful song like a barrel organ.
      • And this sounds even funnier in English: Organ grinder, anyone?
  • August 29, 2011
    IntentionallyIncohesive
    In Order of the Stick, Elan drives Roy (and pretty much any other party member) crazy by playing his lute and singing along.
  • August 30, 2011
    anya1594
    I don't know if this counts, but if you need another real life example...
    • "It's a small world, after all..."
  • September 10, 2011
    Damr1990
  • September 10, 2011
    JonnyB
    Ok, since there was no comments on the examples I flagged for moving, I'm going to move them and launch this trope within the next few days. I think it's languished in YKTTW purgatory long enough.
  • September 10, 2011
    randomsurfer
    ^*I* commented on the Friends example. I said it doesn't count here or at Brown Note. Yes, Phoebe's music is bad; but it doesn't drive people crazy or have a phisiological effect on people.
  • September 11, 2011
    JonnyB
    I missed your comment. Thanks.

    I think I also need a different title quote, as "Henery the Eight" seems to fit more with Loud Of War. the intentional version of this trope.

    Actually, after reading Cacophonix' description here, I think he just might fit this trope, as well as Loud Of War, and not Brown Note.

    Ironically, the original example that started this whole trope, the B5 example, is getting moved because it doesn't fit.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=avlxk7hr2o1xw447j5nk2a2q