Created By: TwoGunAngel on June 30, 2013 Last Edited By: TwoGunAngel on December 27, 2013

A Real Man is a Patriot

A true man loves his country, and is willing to stand by it and fight for it.

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There is a certain manliness about patriotism. A soldier's duty to fight and die for one's nation is among the manliest things on the planet, and even when one isn't a soldier, love of one's country and willingness to stand by it is often seen as indicative of courage, and therefore, true manliness. This trope is most prevalent in American works, where a "real man" is often also a "real American" (though exactly what entails a "real American" is often subject to the No True Scotsman fallacy), though it extends to all others who hold patriotism to their nation in high regard.
Community Feedback Replies: 8
  • June 30, 2013
    KingZeal
    • In many wars, women were employed to stigmatize and humiliate deserters, draft dodgers, or men who just refused to fight.
  • June 30, 2013
    Prfnoff
    • In Bye Bye Birdie, Conrad is acclaimed as a "fine, upstanding, patriotic, healthy, normal American boy" for supposedly volunteering to join the Army.
      First Reporter: Volunteered? I thought he was drafted!
      Third Reporter: And he appealed! Three times!
      Rosie: Sing!
  • June 30, 2013
    xanderiskander
    fun fact: History-wise nationalism (patriotism) is a relatively new idea. It's only been around since the 18th century..
  • June 30, 2013
    KingZeal
    I suppose we could expand the trope to include "Kings' men" or "Queens' men", for the days before nationalism.
  • June 30, 2013
    RedneckRocker
    One line of the "Bro Code" from How I Met Your Mother: "A Bro loves his country. (Unless his country isn't America)).
  • December 27, 2013
    Djanchorhead
    Chris Redfield from Resident Evil is a aversion of this trope. According to an Easter egg in Resident Evil 5 he really isn't all that patriotic.
  • December 27, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In Time Enough For Love Lazaarus Long time travels back to his youth. He wanted to get there just after World War I but miscalculated and got there just before the US enters it. He doesn't want to fight in the war but is basically browbeaten into joining up by his family (who don't know he's from the future), who all accuse him of being unpatriotic.
  • December 27, 2013
    arbiter099
    Has some overlap with My Country Right Or Wrong
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=arnrmre72m1d9vjult1oliaa