Created By: ginsengaddict on January 12, 2015 Last Edited By: ginsengaddict on March 20, 2017

Implacable Healer

The Medic is The Determinator

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Trope
-I'm a doctor. You're my patient. That's all I need to know.

A somewhat common trait among characters who are doctors or clerics, when their desire to cure is the first (sometimes only) priority; it doesn't matter if the character they're trying to heal is a villain, a monster, doesn't want to be healed, or is just plain rude; the medic will. Not. Give. Up on them.

Can be an indication of a tragic Back Story, where the character lost someone close to them, and vowed to never let that happen to anyone else.

Can be a case of Stupid Good, when the patient they refuse to give up on will probably kill them or go on to murder a lot of people after the medic saves them.

The care needed by the patient need not necessarily be urgent. The trope can simply show that no matter how much verbal or physical abuse the patient might throw at the healer, and however fed up the healer might get with the patient, the healer will not retaliate by leaving the patient to his fate.


Examples

Film
  • Big Hero 6: Baymax is programmed to be this. He literally cannot shut down until sufficient aid has been rendered.
    Baymax: I cannot deactivate until you say 'I am satisfied with my care.'

Live Action TV
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
    • On one occasion, Bashir was forced to endure lies and verbal abuse from Garak, when the latter was suffering from psychological and physiological complications brought on by an malfunctioning implant in his brain. Despite the consistent vitriol from Garak, Bashir never wavered in his determination to save Garak.
    • On another occasion, Bashir attempted to cure the Jem'Hadar's dependence on Ketrecel White, a drug used to maintain their loyalty to the Dominion - his obsession with doing was such that O'Brien had to physically sabotage his work snap him out of it.
    • On yet another occasion, Bashir's unshakable will to heal actually resulted in the first child born without the "blight" in a society where literally everyone is born with and died from the disease. Even after this success, he still endeavours to find a cure, long past the episode where it is introduced.

Video Games
  • BlazBlue: Litchi Faye-Ling, the resident doctor, is determined to turn her old friend Arakune to normal, even if she has to make questionable decisions along the way, or even if Arakune himself warned her not to go too far and told her to stop. Eventually, she meets Arakune's disembodied soul (Roy) who insists to her that he prefers staying that way, saying that the two have been playing a game of "who's more selfish", which apparently he won.
  • Florence Nightingale in Fate/Grand Order is summoned as a Berserker, which causes her to have a compulsion to heal anyone she can no matter what due of the Mad Enhancement. It is to the point that she will threaten her own patients if they are being uncooperative and generally disregards her own health if it means saving someone.

Webcomics
  • Dr. Bowman from Freefall was this in his younger years. He was a combat medic for a bunch of uplifted chimpanzee soldiers, being one himself. Unfortunately, because they were created to be biological weapons and chimps were chosen specifically for their aggressive natures and would often become frenzied when injured, he frequently had to beat the casualties under his care unconscious so he could treat them.

Community Feedback Replies: 14
  • January 12, 2015
    Skylite
    Baymax's example is Justified in that he is a robot and that's pretty much his prime directive.

  • January 12, 2015
    DAN004
  • January 12, 2015
    DAN004
    I believe Dr. Tenma of Mon S Ter is an example, but I can't write it well.
  • January 12, 2015
    ginsengaddict
    ^^ Bad Snowclone, and too narrow a concept for this.
  • January 12, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ I mean, this trope is when someone insists to heal someone else against all odds, right?

    Implacable doesn't sound fitting either.

    Just Insisting To Heal would sound good, and will be related to Worst Aid, Comically Inept Healing and Harmful Healing.
  • January 12, 2015
    Chabal2
    Warhammer 40 K: Subverted with ork paindoks, who will not stop experimenting as they work on their patients, and so are only sought out as a last resort..

  • January 13, 2015
    Arivne
    • Blue Linked (backstory).
    • Examples section
      • Added a line separating the Description and Examples sections.
      • Blue Linked media section titles.
      • Italicized work names.
      • Corrected improper Example Indentation in the Star Trek Deep Space Nine examples. If a work has more than one example, each example gets its own 2nd bullet indentation (2 asterisks).

    Big Hero 6 is a Zero Context Example. How To Write An Example - Remember That This Is A Wiki says "you cannot rely on certain elements remaining on the page", such as page quotes. It needs more specific information about how it's this trope.
  • January 15, 2015
    HeroGal2347
    In the character page for Star Trek The Original Series, it mentions that just like Scotty wouldn't give up on keeping the ship together, McCoy refuses to let his patients die if he has any means to save them. An example appears in "Mirror, Mirror" under Inconvenient Hippocratic Oath: "Despite Kirk having had to knock Mirror Spock out when he risked interfering in their plan to return home, McCoy insists on saving him - which would pay off for them in the end."

    Are we sure this isn't Inconvenient Hippocratic Oath?
  • January 16, 2015
    emillang1000
    I think it's related to Inconvenient Hippocratic Oath, but it's a different beast altogether.

    IHO carries with it the sense of an Anti Hero as it were - the doctor in question doesn't WANT to treat the patient, or knows that it is a terrible idea that will get himself into trouble/killed, but his conscience so nags at him that he can't live with himself if he doesn't.

    Implacable Healer or Implacable Medic is more verging on Lawful Stupid or Stupid Good: there isn't a question in their mind that they have a job (healing/treating someone) to do, and damn the consequences. Nothing is going to stop them - not a wall, not a battalion of soldiers, not a Metal Gear, and certainly not a stories-tall, radiation-spewing lizard.

    Think of it as the polar opposite of The Berserker or Blood Knight - once their "SOMEONE NEEDS HEALING" button has been pressed, the blinders turn on, and they will get to their patient to treat them, even if they have to make you one, as well, in doing so (of course, they'll make sure you get proper treatment, too).
  • January 16, 2015
    Peteman
    • Dr. Bowman from Freefall was this in his younger years. He was a combat medic for a bunch of uplifted chimpanzee soldiers, being one himself. Unfortunately, because they were created to be biological weapons and chimps were chosen specifically for their aggressive natures and would often become frenzied when injured, he frequently had to beat the casualties under his care unconscious so he could treat them.
  • March 20, 2017
    Arivne

    It's my understanding that each page can only have one page quote, so one of them will have to go before this is launched.
  • March 20, 2017
    TPPR10
    • Florence Nightingale in Fate Grand Order is summoned as a Berserker, which causes her to have a compulsion to heal anyone she can no matter what due of the Mad Enhancement. It is to the point that she will threaten her own patients if they are being uncooperative and generally disregards her own health if it means saving someone.
  • March 20, 2017
    Getta
    • Blaz Blue: Litchi Faye-Ling, the resident doctor, is determined to turn her old friend Arakune to normal, even if she has to make questionable decisions along the way, or even if Arakune himself warned her not to go too far and told her to stop. Eventually, she meets Arakune's disembodied soul (Roy) who insists to her that he prefers staying that way, saying that the two have been playing a game of "who's more selfish", which apparently he won.
  • March 20, 2017
    Skylite
    • Comicbooks/{X-Men} character Elixir is determined to help and heal as many people as he can while his powers are running properly. This imperative vanishes if his power is corrupted or damaged, but returns when his powers are restored to normal. Triage has similar powers to Elixir but has not shown the "must heal no matter what" compulsion.
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