Created By: Delphi on October 7, 2012 Last Edited By: ginsengaddict on March 11, 2014
Troped

Murder By Inaction

Deliberately not saving someone.

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Trope
What we have here is an ethical dilemma:
'Less I help him get the mask removed, he doesn't have a prayer;
True the gun as never fired, but the way events transpired
I could finish him with simple laissez faire.
What we have here is a tricky moral problem:
Do I help remove the mask, or let him go for lack of air?
Couldn't shoot him when I tried, but the fates are on my side;
I can off the guy by staying in the chair!
Little Shop of Horrors, sung by Seymour

Vegeta: You... green thing... heal me...
Dende: Oh? I'm sorry, I'm having a hard time hearing you over the smell of my people's blood on your hands.
Vegeta: Oh no... Do not be that guy right now!
Dende: Oh, I'm going to be that guy right now.

A convenient way to deal with someone you want dead is to simply not save their life when a situation arises in which their death is inevitable.

Killing is messy. You have to deal with those pesky murder charges, or go to the effort of engineering a convenient "accident" to avert suspicion, or clean up the crime scene to hide your involvement. But as fate would have it, if your foe winds up in a fatal position and you are their only means of survival, all you have to do to kill them... is nothing at all.

In Real Life, this concept is called the duty to rescue. According to The Other Wiki, the failure to offer help for those in need is rarely considered a crime, but there are some countries where people are obligated by the law to come to the aid of those in life peril. In Serbia for example, abandoning a helpless person can earn you a prison sentence of up to one year — eight years if the person in question dies because of the lack of help.

Compare Make It Look Like an Accident and Suicide, Not Murder. Contrast Accidental Murder. Contrast/Compare Failure-to-Save Murder, where someone is held responsible for a death, because they tried and failed to prevent it. Is often the Start of Darkness for a character.

No Real Life Examples, Please!

As a Death Trope, all spoilers will be unmarked ahead. Beware.


Examples:

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     Comic Books 

  • Batman: In issue #633, Robin (Stephanie Brown) dies due to torture and Batman later discovers that Dr. Leslie Thompkins deliberately withheld treatment that could've saved her life but chose not to in order to teach the kids of Gotham a lesson about superheroing. This was retconned into Thompkins making Batman think that Stephanie died, but she didn't really die.
  • Marshal Law: At the climax of the "Kingdom of the Blind" storyarc, Law is very much capable of helping the Private Eye up rather than let him fall to his death. Watching from across the room, Law jokingly insists he "can't quite reach" as the Private Eye struggles and eventually falls.

     Film 

  • Batman Begins: Batman uses this as a loophole around his "no killing" rule to dispose of Ra's al Ghul, who's caught on an about-to-crash train.
    Batman: I won't kill you... but I don't have to save you.
  • The Fifth Element: Subverted. Immediately after Zorg gives Cornelius a diatribe about survival of the fittest and the necessity of destruction, he starts choking on a fruit. Cornelius takes some time to point out the irony, but ultimately performs the Heimlich to save him.
  • Frozen: Attempted by Prince Hans when he first chooses to withhold a potentially life-saving Almost Kiss from Anna, then leaving her to succumb to her frozen heart. You could argue that he also sped up the process by extinguishing flames, but ultimately, it was a choice not to save, rather than to kill.
  • Gladiator: After Maximus disarms Commodus in the arena, Commodus immediately starts demanding one of the surrounding Praetorian Guard to give him a sword. If he hadn't recently and publicly dishonored his own royal guards, they might have.

     Literature 

  • Several murders in Agatha Christie novels, notably in And Then There Were None about an old couple who are accused of doing this to their previous mistress to inherit from her.
  • In one Stephen King book (name, anyone?) a young boy's father has a heart attack in the woods, and he tells the boy to run to the house and get his pills. But on the way to the house, the boy starts thinking about all the horrific sexual abuses his father has inflicted on him, and starts running slower and slower until he's at a leisurely walk. And what do you know, he’s too late.
  • From Dr. Isaac Asimov's I, Robot collection, "Little Lost Robot": This is a concern of Dr. Susan Calvin. A robot has been built with a modified First Law, which in its case permits a robot to allow a human to come to harm via inaction. Calvin posits a situation where a robot with this modification can commit murder - by dropping a heavy weight above a human, knowing that its quick reflexes will allow it to catch the weight in time to not harm the human; but then having dropped the weight it has the ability to decide not to catch the weight.
  • Redwall: Ungatt Trunn dies when, after surviving being thrown into the sea with a broken back, finds himself stranded as the tide comes in. Then his much-abused former seer shows up to gloat, not doing a thing to get him out of the rising water.

     Live Action TV 

  • Babylon 5: Out of jealousy, Lennier's final act on the show was to leave Sheridan behind locked door, flooding with toxic gas. Subverted, in that, A.) he has a change of heart and goes back to correct the mistake, and B.) he returns to find others have arrived to save the day, and is forced to go on the run.
  • Breaking Bad: Walt watches Jesse's girlfriend, Jane choke to death on her own vomit (she'd shot up with heroin). Jane had earlier demanded Walt fork over some drug money and threatened to rat him out. Made worse in that Walt had moved Jane on to her back in order to wake Jesse up, and thus inadvertently caused her death as well.
  • Law & Order: UK: In the episode "Samaritan", based on the original Law & Order episode "Manhood"[[note:Which had more or less the same plot, but involved a gang of officers instead of just one.]], a homophobic policeman is discovered to have essentially killed his (gay) colleague by not getting him any help when he was shot (the courtroom section of the episode is mostly based around proving he was there and deliberately didn't do anything).
  • Luther: The biggest source of blackmail against Luther comes from the opening scene in the pilot, when a child molestor nearly falls to his death while fleeing capture. Instead of helping the molestor back on his feet, Luther lets the man fall to his death.
  • Medium: In one episode, a young Allison has visions about one of her friends. She sees that, by knocking on his door, she will stop him from killing himself, and many years later he will rape and murder teenage girls. So a few days later, she decides to not interrupt his suicide.
  • Midsomer Murders: There's one where a snobby wine lover is tied to his lawn while the murderer is catapulting wine bottles at him. His wife comes to the window and sees the whole thing (though the murderer remains unidentified). When she sees the bottle miss, she calls out corrections to the murderer. The next morning, the police arrive but she of course didn't see anything.
  • Orphan Black: Suspecting Aynsley to be her monitor (erroneously), Alison does nothing to prevent Aynsley from accidentally strangling herself with a scarf and a drain grinder.
  • Person of Interest: At the end of the episode Reasonable Doubt, John decides the POI and her husband just aren't worth saving, and leaves a gun for the husband to even the odds in allowing them to kill each other.
  • This is how Xena: Warrior Princess originally killed Callisto; they tumbled down a hill, Callisto landed in quicksand and Xena simply let her sink. She got better though, multiple times.

     Music 

  • In Carrie Underwood's "Blown Away" a young girl gets rid of her abusive father by locking herself in the cellar while he’s passed out drunk and there’s a tornado headed straight for the house.
  • A popular Urban Legend surrounds the Phil Collins song "In The Air Tonight". The legend usually involves someone watching someone else drown to death and being unwilling to help along with several other variations. In actuality, the song was about a divorce.

     Theatre 

  • In Lillian Hellman's 1939 play The Little Foxes (later made into a 1941 film starring Bette Davis), Horace decides to cut his evil wife Regina out of his will, and tells her so. Shortly thereafter he feels a heart attack coming on and asks Regina for his pills. She does nothing, instead watching as he collapses. He dies a few hours later without changing his will.
  • Little Shop of Horrors: Seymour tries to shoot Orin the Depraved Dentist, but can't bring himself to. Moments later, Orin gets himself high inside a mask full of gas, but finds he can't get it off and begs Seymour to help him get it off (while he laugh maniacally.) Seymour just stands by and Orin suffocates.

     Video Games 

  • Amnesia: Justine: The titular character is presented with the option of doing this three times.
  • Ghost Recon: Future Soldier: The Ghost team deployed in Russia was about to take out the leader of the coup in Moscow when they were ordered by the US government to take him in alive. Ghost Leader is pissed off at this, but doesn't do anything to help the coup leader escape from being killed by an incoming train since he said "our orders were not to touch you."
  • Heavy Rain:
    • Norman Jayden can do this if he fights the Origami Killer in the end. The alternative is to save him and then kill him.
    • Shelby can also do this to Charles Kramer by not giving him his pills while he's having a heart attack.

     Web Original 

  • Dragon Ball Z Abridged: Following the scene where Krillan has mortally wounded Vegeta (as Vegeta requested), Dende is understandably unwilling to heal him on account of his partaking in the Namekian genocide. He reluctantly does so when Gohan points out how screwed they are without Vegeta's assistance.

     Western Animation 

  • Avatar: The Last Airbender: In a flashback showing parts of Roku's life, Sozin leaves Roku to die when the latter accidentally inhales toxic fumes from an erupting volcano.

Community Feedback Replies: 74
  • October 7, 2012
    Tuckerscreator
    • In Little Shop Of Horrors, Seymour tries to shoot Orin the Depraved Dentist, but can't bring himself to. Moments later, Orin gets himself high inside a mask full of gas, but finds he can't get it off and begs Seymour to help him get it off (while he laugh maniacally.) Seymour just stands by and Orin suffocates.
    • Batman Begins: Batman uses this as a loophole around his "no killing" rule to dispose of Ra's al Ghul, who's caught on an about-to-crash train.
      Batman: I won't kill you... but I don't have to save you.
  • October 7, 2012
    Koveras
    • In Heavy Rain, Norman Jayden can do this if he fights the Origami Killer in the end. The alternative is to save him and then kill him.
  • October 7, 2012
    countrymatters
    I'm almost positive I've seen this happen in a Sherlock Holmes story or two, but I can't remember where. I'll get back to you.
  • October 7, 2012
    captainpat
    Huh, could have sworn we have this. Anyway please rewrite this description without the Alice And Bob scenario (see Example As A Thesis). Remember, leave the examples to the example section.
  • October 7, 2012
    KTera
    Also in Heavy Rain, Shelby can do this to Charles Kramer by not giving him his pills while he's having a heart attack.
  • October 7, 2012
    Noaqiyeum
    Title suggestion: Passive Homicide.
  • October 7, 2012
    Astaroth
    Does this trope warrant a 'death trope, beware of unmarked spoilers' warning?
  • October 7, 2012
    Goldfritha
    The villain often gets this when he shouts Give Me A Sword to minions.
  • October 7, 2012
    Goldfritha
    • In Gladiator, Maximus disarms Commodus in the arena, and Commodus immediately starts demanding one of the surrounding Praetorian Guard to give him a sword. If he hadn't recently and publicly dishonored his own royal guards, they might have.
  • October 7, 2012
    lilliterra
    In an episode of Monk, a man's obnoxious boss gets his tie stuck in the motor of a semi truck. The man at first moves to help his choking employer, and then hangs back, changing his mind.
  • October 7, 2012
    AP
    • The somewhat controversial ending to Batman Begins involves Batman refusing to save Ra's Al Ghul from a crashing railcar.
  • October 8, 2012
    Chabal2
    • Redwall: the warlord Ungatt Trunn dies when, after surviving being thrown into the sea with a broken back, finds himself stranded as the tide comes in. Then his much-abused former seer shows up to gloat, not doing a thing to get him out of the rising water.
    • Midsomer Murders: There's one where a snobby wine lover is tied to his lawn while the murderer is catapulting wine bottles at him. His wife comes to the window and sees the whole thing (though the murderer remains unidentified). When she sees the bottle miss, she calls out corrections to the murderer. The next morning, the police arrive but she of course didn't see anything.
  • January 15, 2013
    randomsurfer
    This is a concern of Susan Calvin in one of Isaac Asimov's short stories in I Robot. A robot has been built with a modified First Law, which in its case permits a robot to allow a human to come to harm via inaction. Calvin posits a situation where a robot with this modification can commit murder - by dropping a heavy weight above a human, knowing that its quick reflexes will allow it to catch the weight in time to not harm the human; but then having dropped the weight it has the ability to decide not to catch the weight.

    [Edited because of Tiiba's comment below. I don't know if Tiiba was specifically referring to my example, but looking at it I could see that it looked like I meant that the First Law does allow this. It does not. The robot in question had a modified First Law because it was working with humans who were being exposed to brief amounts of radiation. Other robots would rush in to save the human because he might forget to leave the radiated area in time, even though the radiation is instantly lethal to a robot brain.]
  • January 15, 2013
    partner555
    Perhaps a note on how this would work in Real Life.

    Also a note on whether Real Life examples are allowed or No Real Life Examples Please applies.
  • January 15, 2013
    CharacterInWhite
    One for Live Action TV:
    • Luther: The biggest source of blackmail against Luther comes from the opening scene in the pilot, when a child molestor nearly falls to his death while fleeing capture. Instead of helping the molestor back on his feet, Luther lets the man fall to his death.
  • January 15, 2013
    Aspie
    "Be careful what you say to the police" may not be a necessary warning here, assuming the fictional world follows the same laws as the real one. (Admittedly, a risky assumption.) With a few exceptions, not saving someone who is dying or otherwise in danger is not illegal. (In the US anyway...no comment on other nations.)
  • January 15, 2013
    gallium
    [[folder: Theater]]
    • In Lillian Hellman's 1939 play The Little Foxes (later made into a 1941 film starring Bette Davis), Horace decides to cut his evil wife Regina out of his will, and tells her so. Shortly thereafter he feels a heart attack coming on and asks Regina for his pills. She does nothing, instead watching as he collapses. He dies a few hours later without changing his will.
    [[/folder]]
  • January 15, 2013
    AP
    • A popular Urban Legend surrounds the Phil Collins song In The Air Tongiht. The legend usually involves someone watching someone else drown to death and being unwilling to help along with several other variations. In actuality, the song was about a divorce.
  • January 16, 2013
    justanid
  • January 16, 2013
    sgamer82
    Also contrast Failure To Save Murder, in which a character is blamed for the death of someone he tried and failed to save.
  • January 16, 2013
    dvorak
    Comics
    • In a Grim Fairy Tales re-telling of Beauty And The Beast, one character refuses to get his abusive father's heart pills.
  • January 16, 2013
    randomsurfer
    There was a short lived network tv Police Procedural I can't remember the name of...it came out a few years after NYPD Blue debuted and was promoted as even more violent and gritty (but no swearing or nudity). Anyway, in the first episode a shooter goes on a random killing spree including taking out a few cops. The shooter is himself shot and dragged into a police station. They call an ambulance but he bleeds out before they get there. The shooter's family later sues the cops, saying that they let him die instead of calling for paramedics in time.
  • January 16, 2013
    Nithael
    Live Action TV
    • In one episode of Medium, a young Allison has visions about one of her friends. She sees that, by knocking on his door, she will stop him from killing himself, and many years later he will rape and murder teenage girls. So a few days later, she decides to not interrupt his suicide.
  • January 16, 2013
    Tiiba
    Asimov's first law prohibits it.
  • October 6, 2013
    Prfnoff
  • October 6, 2013
    gallium
    Live-Action TV
    • On a second-season episode of Breaking Bad, Walt watches Jesse's girlfriend Jane choke to death on her own vomit (she'd shot up with heroin). Jane had earlier demanded Walt fork over some drug money and threatened to rat him out. Made worse in that Walt had moved Jane on to her back in order to wake Jesse up, and thus inadvertently caused her death as well. It's the biggest Moral Event Horizon Walt crosses over the whole course of the series.
  • October 6, 2013
    Chabal2
    Several murders in Agatha Christie, notably in And Then There Were None (the old couple are accused of doing this to their previous mistress to inherit from her).
  • October 6, 2013
    gallium
    deleted post
  • October 7, 2013
    DAN004
    ...(this was about Batman Begins, and I didn't realize someone already posted this)...
  • October 7, 2013
    Alvin
    Literature: There's a short story by Dorothy L Sayers , where a playwright who secretly hates his agent is, when that agent needs a blood transfusion, is required to give blood and monitor the test that tells if the types are compatible. He may see a reaction, but doesn't say anything. The agent dies, and the playwright thinks he might have killed him, but will get away it. Sayers actually seems to have written this as part of a Detection Club (I think) challenge, and the Scotland Yard person who judged the results said she hadn't followed the rules: the way she wrote it, the playwright hadn't really killed anyone. Edited to add: I used Dorothy L Sayers' page on This Very Wiki to refresh my memory, and the story is called 'Blood Sacrifice' and the challenge stories 'Six Against the Yard'.
  • October 7, 2013
    Bisected8
    Compare Failure To Save Murder, where someone is held responsible for a death because they didn't prevent it.

    • In the Law And Order UK episode "Samaritan" (based on the original Law And Order episode "Manhood"note ), a homophobic policeman is discovered to have essentially killed his (gay) colleague by not getting him any help when he was shot (the courtroom section of the episode is mostly based around proving he was there and deliberately didn't do anything).
  • October 7, 2013
    dalek955
    [[never mind]]
  • October 9, 2013
    qazwsx
    Live Action TV

    • Orphan Black: In the season one finale, Alison allows Aynsley to be strangled when her clothes got caught in the garbage disposal because she thought Aynsley was spying on her for the neolutionists. She wasn't.
  • October 9, 2013
    DragonQuestZ
    • Sf Debris really calls on the prime directive of Star Trek when he feels it boils down to this.
  • October 10, 2013
    AgProv
    ""Be careful what you say to the police" may not be a necessary warning here, assuming the fictional world follows the same laws as the real one. (Admittedly, a risky assumption.) With a few exceptions, not saving someone who is dying or otherwise in danger is not illegal. (In the US anyway...no comment on other nations.)"

    In Britain, I believe this is a crime - manslaughter, (or third-degree murder to the USA) - I'll hunt down a few legal cases and precedents to be sure.

    to allow somebody to die when you could have acted to save their life breaches common-law expectations of duty of care from one citizen to another. There is a caveat that if rescue involves placing yourself at unacceptable risk, or presumes specialist knowledge or skills you do not have, it is understood direct action would fail and place the would-be rescuer at risk. But then the onus is on you to call for rescue from people in a position to provide appropriate assistance. Fail to do this and you can be charged with manslaughter by omission and failure to act - although proving it to a court's satisfaction is a different thing entirely!
  • October 10, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    In Real Life, this concept is called the duty to rescue. According to The Other Wiki, the failure to offer help for those in need is rarely considered a crime, but there are some countries where people are obligated by the law to come to the aid of those in life peril. In Serbia for example, abandoning a helpless person can earn you a prison sentence of up to one year — eight years if the person in question dies because of the lack of help.
  • October 11, 2013
    Synchronicity
    Compare Bystander Syndrome, except that trope has more to do with apathy.
  • March 7, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    • Added all suggested examples
    • Formatted everything
    • Added all Compare and Contrast suggestions
    • The Fifth Element subversion added
  • March 7, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    Which indexes?

    Death Tropes obviously.
  • March 7, 2014
    StarSword
    A Defied Trope when dealing with Three Laws Compliant robots, since the First Law requires them to come to humans' aid if possible.
  • March 7, 2014
    flamingcarrot
    Amnesia: Justine's titular character is presented with the option of doing this three times.
  • March 7, 2014
    BaffleBlend
    Possible page quote:

    Vegeta: You... green thing... heal me...
    Dende: Oh? I'm sorry, I'm having a hard time hearing you over the smell of my people's blood on your hands.
    Vegeta: Oh no... Do not be that guy right now!
    Dende: Oh, I'm going to be that guy right now.
  • March 7, 2014
    abateman
  • March 7, 2014
    StarSword
    Formatted page quote.
  • March 7, 2014
    abateman
  • March 7, 2014
    StarSword
  • March 7, 2014
    abateman
    Also another example. Attempted by Prince Hans in Frozen. He crosses the Moral Event Horizon when he first chooses to withhold a potentially life-saving Almost Kiss from Anna, then leaving her to succumb to her frozen heart. You could argue that he also sped up the process by extinguishing flames, but ultimately, it was a choice not to save, rather than to kill.
  • March 7, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    What else is needed?

    Need some hats.
  • March 7, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    Alphabetized examples, re-worded some examples to put work titles first.
  • March 8, 2014
    Arivne
    The first three paragraphs of the Description are still an Example As A Thesis and need to be re-written into a simple description of the trope.
  • March 8, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    ^ Any better?
  • March 8, 2014
    GeneralLuigi
    Western Animation:

    Avatar The Last Airbender: In a flashback showing parts of Roku's life, Sozin leaves Roku to die when the latter accidentally inhales toxic fumes from an erupting volcano.
  • March 8, 2014
    Goldfritha
    Note that in most places while there is no general duty, individuals may have a duty to rescue, such as the parents of minor children, or a person responsible for the danger.
  • March 8, 2014
    randomsurfer
    In Batman #633 Robin (Stephanie Brown) dies due to torture, and Batman later discovers that Dr. Leslie Thompkins deliberately withheld treatment that could've saved her life but chose not to in order to teach the kids of Gotham a lesson about superheroing. This was retconned into Thompkins making Batman think that Stephanie died, but she didn't really die.
  • March 8, 2014
    StarSword
    Corrected formatting in the Carrie Underwood example.
  • March 9, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    What else is needed?
  • March 9, 2014
    EponymousKid
    At the climax of Marshal Law: Kingdom of the Blind, Law is very much capable of helping the Private Eye up rather than let him fall to his death. Watching from across the room, Law jokingly insists he "can't quite reach" as the Private Eye struggles and eventually falls.
  • March 9, 2014
    Ominae
    In Ghost Recon: Future Soldier, the Ghost team deployed in Russia was about to take out the leader of the coup in Moscow when they were ordered by the US government to take him in alive. Ghost Leader is pissed off at this, but doesn't do anything to help the coup leader escape from being killed by an incoming train since he said "our orders were not to touch you."
  • March 9, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    Some of the examples have improper emphasis. I'll come back later.
  • March 10, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    New examples added.

    ^ Cool.
  • March 10, 2014
    robinjohnson
    Seymour's lines from "Now (It's Just the Gas)" in the stage musical of Little Shop Of Horrors, already listed as an example, might make a good page quote:
    What we have here is an ethical dilemma:
    'Less I help him get the mask removed, he doesn't have a prayer;
    True the gun as never fired, but the way events transpired
    I could finish him with simple laissez faire.
    What we have here is a tricky moral problem:
    Do I help remove the mask, or let him go for lack of air?
    Couldn't shoot him when I tried, but the fates are on my side;
    I can off the guy by staying in the chair!
  • March 10, 2014
    robinjohnson
    • In one of Isaac Asimov's robot stories, some Three Laws Compliant robots are reprogrammed with a First Law of simply "A robot shall not harm a human being" - removing the clause "or through inaction allow a human being to come to harm". This makes them capable of murder through inaction. One specialist considers that a robot like this could kill someone by, say, dropping its victim off a cliff in such a way that it could snatch them back if it wanted to, then letting inaction do the rest.

    EDIT: I really should check whether examples have already been provided before submitting them!
  • March 10, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    ^ Kinda already have that one.

    ^^ No reason we can't use both page quotes.
  • March 10, 2014
    KingZeal
    • During Devin Grayson's run on Nightwing, the eponymous hero is taunted by his Arch Nemesis Blockbuster, who now knows his Secret Identity and can use it to toy with Grayson's life whenever he wants. He taunts Grayson with the knowledge that there's no way out of this situation, and that everyone he knows and loves is now at risk for as long as Blockbuster lives. Nightwing has a Heroic BSOD as a result. The Tarantula, Nightwing's very own Stalker With A Crush, pulls a gun and puts it to Blockbuster's head and tells Nightwing all he has do to is walk away. Nightwing does so, and we hear a telling "BANG!". The implications of what he's done makes Nightwing BSOD that much harder.
  • March 10, 2014
    crazysamaritan
    Made the emphasis changes, and a few other small things. (indentation, namespace, etc)
  • March 10, 2014
    StarSword
    Only one page quote is allowed per page. Pick one and save the other for the Quotes tab.
  • March 10, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    In that case, going with the DBZ Abridged quote.
  • March 10, 2014
    gallium
    Failure To Save Murder already includes this as the third of three variants of that trope.

    "And lastly, there is a third version where Alice could have saved Charlie but chose not to, thus assuming some responsibility for his death even if she did not directly kill him."
  • March 10, 2014
    Lakija
    I think Passive Homicide is the best title. It's been turning over in my head for a long while. Someone else suggested it too. Just my two cents.

  • March 10, 2014
    arbiter099
    Not a fan of the DBZA quote. It's also Not An Example, Little Green does heal Vegeta. Throwing my hat in for the simple, "dont't have to save you", batman line.
  • March 11, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    ^ It's an example of a subversion. There are a couple more of those in there. Let's set up a crowner. Which quote gets to be page quote, and which get the quotes page: Batman Begins, DBZA or Little Shop?

    ^^ I disagree, that name is very Big Words and doesn't illustrate the trope as well, but we'll take a vote. Anyone know how to set up a crowner for these?

    ^^^ I take issue with it being there. That trope is about blame, this trope is about malice.
  • March 11, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    Collating Indexes:

    (please edit this comment if you think of further indexes this should be under)
  • March 11, 2014
    ginsengaddict
    5 hats at the time of this comment. Launching soon.
  • March 11, 2014
    gallium
    ^Probably should tweak the definition of Failure To Save Murder then.
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