Created By: Justin_Brett on May 25, 2011 Last Edited By: Justin_Brett on June 29, 2011

Rush the Psychic

Getting around a villain who analyzes attacks by not letting him take advantage of it.

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Trope
This has cropped up more than a couple times in media, I'd wager: when the heroes are fighting a villain who has studied their individual fighting styles and adapted to them, they get around that by attacking them simultaneously or in different ways very quickly. The enemy is usually a robot of some kind, but not always.

Could probably use a better name.
Community Feedback Replies: 32
  • May 26, 2011
    Damr1990
    On One Episode of Power Rangers(forgot wich generation, time force i think ) the {{Monster of the week) has analysed all of the rangers weapons and has effectively neutralized them, then they use this strategy, and using the Mid Season Upgrade they just got to give the finishin blow
  • May 26, 2011
    jaytee
    Definitely Needs A Better Name. A Laconic would help too - it's completely impossible on the YKTTW page to tell what this is about without expanding it.
  • May 26, 2011
    randomsurfer
    We Have This I Swear...I thought it was Overclocking Attack but I was wrong. But I know I've seen it around here somewhere.
  • May 26, 2011
    Auxdarastrix
  • May 26, 2011
    PaleHorse87
    Death In All Directions, Beam Spam, Spam Attack, Macross Missile Massacre and More Dakka all seem to be relatives, but I'm not sure if any are really this trope.
  • May 26, 2011
    Auxdarastrix
    Sounds a lot like "The heroes actually use tactics for a change instead of playing stupid one-on-one fighting games." Don't know if that is already trope or not. :-)
  • May 26, 2011
    Justin_Brett
    Added a possible laconic description.
  • May 26, 2011
    hevendor717
    Dump on Strategy? Having trouble making a decent title.

    BoboboBoboBobo and Don Patch can overwhelm foes who think they're ready by assaulting them with ludicrous new attacks.
  • May 26, 2011
    hevendor717
    Done often in all the Yugioh anime. You've studied my deck and my dueling skills? Well here are some cards you've never seen!
  • May 27, 2011
    PaleHorse87
    Okay, I get that the basic set-up is a villain that has studied the heroes every move and found responses for all of it. But, I'm seeing two different possible interpretations of the solution the Hero uses. Does the hero respond by pulling out a new attack method that hasn't been used yet, and therefore the villain didn't prepare for?

    Or is it the hero saying Screw Tactics and just hammering the villain with so much of their usual strategy that the villain is incapable of defending against it all?
  • May 27, 2011
    kentdyson88
    In response to Palehorse87:

    I'd say it could be use both ways.

    Here are some examples:

    I know for example there was one Power Rangers episode where they went up against Goldar in his zord Cyclopsis. It changes to match the attacks of whatever zord it's fighting. The Rangers beat it by switching zords. They start with the Megazord, then summon Dragonzord, then the Megadragonzord, and finally Ultrazord. It eventually overloads from too many changes and they destroy it.

    There was a Superman comic where a man had advanced alien spacecraft that could analyze and predict Superman's moves. At one point his friends had to take control of his body and guide him(makes sense in context) and they had different ideas on what he should do, so the attacks became so random the machine couldn't figure it out and the villain surrendered.

    In another one Brainiac thought he had deststroyed Metropolis and Superman would be coming after him in a rage. He had prepared for that but Superman was being perfectly rational was only pretending. That caught Brainiac off guard.
  • May 27, 2011
    dalek955
  • May 30, 2011
    Justin_Brett
    In some cases this trope could involve invoking that, certainly.
  • May 30, 2011
    Fearmonger
    There's a boss in Final Fantasy XI which uses a lot of powerful skills, making in nearly unbeatable. The trick, supposedly, is to use your version of that skill, which prevents it from doing the same. This means to weaken it as much as possible, your party has to spam the right high level skills at it, preventing it from using them on you.
  • June 6, 2011
    TBeholder
    Saturation Attack?
  • June 6, 2011
    Speedball
    Brute Force the Psychic might work.

    I swear I saw this happen in Pilot Candidate. The protagonist was fencing against a guy who could read your thoughts--so he decided "screw it!" and lunged at the guy, because any attempt at strategy would result in the guy reading his mind and reacting appropriately. The telepath admits that, indeed, against someone who knows your every move, you have to unrelentingly make sure they don't have any chance at mounting a defense.
  • June 7, 2011
    Justin_Brett
    ^ That works a lot better.
  • June 7, 2011
    cocoy0
    Yusuke of Ghost Fighter does this to a human who can foresee his next attacks. Yusuke just punched him so fast that he didn't have the time to react.
  • June 9, 2011
    MrNekomata
    I wouldn't say villains, per say. The children in Akira didn't welcome him with open arms, when they used those toys in their attack but only to have him saved by stepping on a broken glass shard. Yet to for lack of a better word 'Scare' them off with the blood from the cut.
  • June 9, 2011
    Speedball
    This trope is one of the reasons Doctor Octopus is Spider-Man's greatest villain. Spider-man can dodge most incoming attacks thanks to his Spider-sense, but Doc Ock can hit him with almost more attacks than he can keep up with.
  • June 9, 2011
    jaytee
    I don't like Brute Force The Psychic for a few reasons. Most importantly, it gives zero indication that this is a Combat Trope - it sounds more like some kind of brain-hacking. Second, this trope really doesn't require a psychic - there are lots of characters with the ability to predict attacks without being psychic. Third, this trope doesn't seem to require brute force either - the enemy could be defeated through some kind of cunning rather than a Spam Attack.
  • June 9, 2011
    LarryD
    Speaking of Spider-Man; Once the Beetle (a former Iron-Man opponent trying to make a come back) programmed a battle computer with data on Spider-Man (obtained by roof cameras). It didn't help that much, as Spider-Man is the poster guy for extemporaneous tactical improvisation.
  • June 9, 2011
    Ryusui
  • June 9, 2011
    Damr1990
  • June 9, 2011
    Chabal2
    Brute Force The Psychic sounds like applying Talk To The Fist / When All You Have Is A Hammer to a psionic to beaat it. Pretty sure that's not the trope described...
  • June 9, 2011
    Speedball
    Rush The Psychic then. The idea is to overwhelm someone who can anticipate your moves, right?
  • June 25, 2011
    Bisected8
    What about Pushing The Offensive, since that's basically what they're doing (attacking before their opponent has a chance to prepare).
  • June 25, 2011
    Grain
    What Justin_Brett is describing, so far, is nothing more than strategic battle. Fighters have strategies, and then they create counter-strategies, and then they create counter-counter strategies.

    This article seems like People Sit On Chairs to me. If nobody else agrees, name it Counter-Counter Strategy.
  • June 26, 2011
    Pyrite
    Are we talking about Speed Blitz beating Mind Reading / Awesomeness By Analysis? If so, take out the "in different ways" part, as that throws in the element of Confusion Fu. And as previously mentioned, they don't have to be psychic.

    A good name escapes me presently. Too Fast To Counter?

    Example: Quicksilver beat Mister X (a Martial Artist Telepath) in Dark Reign, saying that he'd be able to predict every single attack... and do nothing about it.
  • June 27, 2011
    oztrickster
    Dragon Ball Z had Dr Gero study the main characters and began building androids capable of defeating them, but he based his observations on the characters before they went to Namek where every character got a fairly big boost in power
  • June 29, 2011
    meretricious
    How is this different from No Time To Think? I think I see it, but I want to make sure.
  • June 29, 2011
    Confusion567
    This is forcing an analytical enemy into No Time To Think when they're not ready.

    If we want to be snarky, Analyze This!

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