Poor Business Model
A business that does in its employees or customers


(permanent link) added: 2012-04-27 14:04:35 sponsor: bulmabriefs144 (last reply: 2012-12-28 06:37:27)

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The manager or CEO of a company provides it with a vision of proper mission goals. They decide what the company needs, and what they have to do to achieve it.

However... some companies do not have a proper plan, or acceptable goals. This is not about simple bad bosses, but rather a case when a company does things that put the health of their employees in danger. No, we're not talking about No OSHA Compliance or massive infractions to child labor laws. This company does something much worse, and has a Poor Business Model for the simple reason that if things continue, there would be no company. If a company feeds all its employees to a giant plant, this qualifies, as does creating People Jars for every customer or employee, as does making tofu from the meat of the manager.

A company that has goals like this is probably not after making money, but they have to maintain the pretense for awhile, in order to achieve their other goal (brains, life energy, souls, or simply gaining new bodies either to eat or to possess with aliens/demons/monsters). How they get the resources to maintain this charade is not always explained, however.

In most cases, the business in question will fold, resulting in one of many scenarios:

  1. The one running the show will get done in by their own plan through a general lack of planning (or they succeed over and over again despite the nature of their business, making this a Black Comedy).
  2. The one seemingly in charge is actually being backed by a foreign element (mafia, evil plants, or sometimes actual aliens), who will take over in the event of the manager being destroyed or ruined.
  3. A hero exposes the secret of the place and shuts it down. To qualify as this and not the others, the focus must be on the hero rather than the company. Given the nature of this trope, they seldom succeed, usually going to the wrong authorities, or selling out to the company.

Contrast Evil Inc. which is evil but without the tendency to do in its employees or customer base.


Example:

  • Little Shop of Horrors is a classic case of this, especially in the play where Audrey, Mushnik, and Seymour are all fed to the plant, along with the dentist.
  • Mega Meaty Meat in Teen Titans, is run by a creature called The Source. Beast Boy, who's largely sold out to get a moped, finds out his company is selling essentially tofu burgers made out of an alien tofu creature, in order to abduct nearby cattle.
  • Soylent Green. The hero is not involved in the company that makes Soylent Green, instead being a detective of some sort. The police don't seem likely to tell everyone about Soylent Green, any more that the countless people sleeping on the streets are willing to listen.
  • Company by Max Barry has an absurdly messed up company. Nobody has met the CEO, the business has no apparent purpose, the receptionist seems to be paid more than anyone else when all she does is look pretty, and people who are fire seem to disappear.
  • In Sailor Moon, this happens frequently, with villains creating dummy businesses that suck the energy out of all their customers, extracting heart crystals, etcetera.
  • The nameless company in Dilbert has embarked on too many employee and/or customer killing projects to count. Yet they somehow manage to stay afloat.
    • For example, one time they sold giant donuts filled with lard and shards of glass.
  • Both GeneCo of Repo! The Genetic Opera and The Union of the blatant rip-off Repo Men murder customers who fail to make their exorbitant monthly payments on their artificial organs. GeneCo at least has the possibility of making a profit off their cosmetic surgery division.
  • In The Witcher, the eponymous witchers were invented after a massive invasion of extradimensional monsters to protect humanity from them. However, they were so efficient that by the time the books take place, there are talks that the witchers are not needed anymore, as the baseline humans can mop up the remaining monsters on their own.
  • Double Subverted in Claymore: the Organization finances itself by killing demonic yoma for money. It is eventually revealed that a secret branch of it produces most yoma in the first place and scatters them across the land... However, they don't do it for money but instead to continue their experiments to create Super Soldiers for a Great Offscreen War.
  • Witch Hunter Robin has specially made witch-hunting weapon Orbo derived from witches themselves, and employs witches to kill off other witches. Guess what happens when the witches they employ get too big for their job?
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