Created By: dsneybuf on August 15, 2011 Last Edited By: dsneybuf on October 6, 2011
Troped

Close on Title

Works that place the title card at the end, as opposed to the beginning.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • The Ouran High School Host Club episode about Kaoru and Hikaru meeting Tamaki for the first time, "The Door the Twins Opened", saves its title card for the closing scene, after the twins open the door to the Host Club's room.

Comic Books
  • The Spider-Man comic "The Night Gwen Stacy Died" saves the title for the last panel, in order to prevent readers from discovering too soon which Spider-Man character Marvel decided to kill off.
    • Peter David's "The Death of Jean DeWolff" did this as well.
  • Every issue of the John Stewart-centric comic Green Lantern: Mosaic had the story title on the last page.
  • The comic detailing Captain America's death, "The Death of the Dream", saved its title for the closing.
  • In a Deadpool story where his eardrums get destroyed by an explosion, and then he ends up fighting magical mimes, there are no words at all till the last page, and the punny title, Silent But Deadly, is the very last thing of all.

Film

Western Animation
  • The Pixar Short Day and Night does not have its title displayed until the ending, after Day and Night have become friends.
  • The BBC kid's show Kerwhizz ("The quiz with added whizz") has a "K" logo and a theme song which includes the title at the start, and it's referred to several times per show, but the title only appears on-screen during the closing credits.

So, let's say you're watching a movie. As you get introduced to the characters, you might expect the title card to show up soon. However, several minutes pass without it. You wonder briefly what's taking so long, but then decide to just enjoy the film. Once the characters have completed their journey and the movie ends...the title card finally shows up.

What took so long? The answer can differ depending on the story. Maybe the title refers to something the protagonist spent the entire plot learning. Maybe it refers to something the character becomes by the time the story ends. Maybe the title contains a spoiler. Then again, maybe it just felt unique.

For the record, that last explanation is the reason this intro comes all the way at the article's end.

Contrast The Teaser, where the title takes a few minutes to appear, but still does so before the conclusion.
Community Feedback Replies: 22
  • August 15, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Mentioned with a few examples on the The Teaser page.
  • August 15, 2011
    dsneybuf
    Well, someone up and removed those mentions. I didn't think it made sense for them to go there anyway.
  • August 15, 2011
    benjamminsam
    As randomsurfer alluded to, this phenomenon is technically considered a Cold Open (redirects to The Teaser)... although given that the entire work is The Teaser, I don't think this trope really applies there, so this could definitely be split off in my opinion.
  • August 15, 2011
    Echidnite
    Hanna both opens and closes on the title, in an example of Book Ends.
  • August 16, 2011
    Medinoc
    Didn't The Lion King end this way?
  • August 16, 2011
    dsneybuf
    I didn't intend to include movies that show the title at the beginning and the end, but if someone can explain why they sound relevant...
  • August 16, 2011
    TrustBen
    Non-movie example: Every issue of the John Stewart-centric comic Green Lantern: Mosaic had the story title on the last page.
  • August 16, 2011
    regresal
    all the episodes of Adventure Time. Also, Lost.
  • August 17, 2011
    dsneybuf
    Anyone want to try coming up with a description?
  • August 17, 2011
    Psychobabble6
    Avatar and How To Train Your Dragon shouldn't be part of the same example. Also, because this is primarily a movie trope, should live action and animated films be separated? Or is that unnecessary?
  • August 17, 2011
    randomsurfer
  • August 19, 2011
    dsneybuf
    I tried to find a good picture from Inception, and the closest I got to finding one that looked like the end of the movie had the title preceded by the standard disclaimer about the people being fictional and any resemblance to actual people would prove coincidental. Does that sound like something people would recognize as the end of the movie?
  • August 20, 2011
    LeeM
    Pretty sure I YKTTW'd something similar a while back. Anyway, one title I mentioned was:

    • Western animation (although it has some live-action elements): The BBC kid's show Kerwhizz ("The quiz with added whizz") has a "K" logo and a theme song which includes the title at the start, and it's referred to several times per show, but the title only appears on-screen during the closing credits.
  • September 6, 2011
    Xtifr
    Comics:
    • In a Deadpool story where his eardrums get destroyed by an explosion, and then he ends up fighting magical mimes, there are no words at all till the last page, and the punny title, Silent But Deadly, is the very last thing of all.
  • September 10, 2011
    OneMore
    I believe there was a Puella Magi Madoka Magica episode that had its opening in the end. Investigate?
  • September 10, 2011
    randomsurfer
    There may have been a Monty Pythons Flying Circus episode where this happened. I know they played around with the positioning of the opening and closing credits - at least one didn't have any opening credits at all, and another had the closing right after the opening.
  • September 10, 2011
    dsneybuf
    This has bugged me for a while now: the phrase, "Can you read the timer?" is supposed to be the caption for the picture. How do I get them to line up?
  • September 10, 2011
    randomsurfer
    One of the many buggy things about ykttw is right-justified pictures don't work with captions. It'll be fine when you make the page.

    Although, personally I can't read the timer.
  • September 10, 2011
    IlGreven
    Medinoc: It did end that way, but it also began that way.
  • September 10, 2011
    CommanderPanda
    Would movies like Paul that fill the resolution of the story with "And they made a movie of it," count if the Title Card of the movie of the movie came up?
  • September 11, 2011
    dsneybuf
    If that scene marks the first time we see the title card, yes.
  • October 6, 2011
    dsneybuf
    Anything else we need to do before launching this?
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