Created By: Twospoonfuls on September 30, 2012 Last Edited By: Twospoonfuls on October 2, 2012
Nuked

Nerd apotheosis

We welcome our new inadequate overlords.

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The chief characteristic of the common put upon boy/girl/creature gifted with incredible superpowers is their staggering banality of aspiration. Things typically not on the superbeing's agenda include ending poverty, solving the energy crisis, world peace or thinking beyond good and evil. No, the most important things on the to do list are slapping down the high school/office/area man bully and doing the police department's job for it. Golden era comics are all about this kind of wish fulfilment, where the task of the hero is to preserve the status quo ante by slapping the guns out of the hands of the pettily powerful and investing the monopoly of violence in just one person.
Community Feedback Replies: 7
  • October 1, 2012
    Twospoonfuls
    Like lottery winners who remain poor people with lots of money.
  • October 1, 2012
    Arivne
    The description sounds like a rant.
  • October 1, 2012
    Twospoonfuls
    It is. Is that a bad thing?
  • October 1, 2012
    Damr1990
    There's a reason why we have the Rule of Cautious Editing Judgment, while not inherently bad, many rant's ,due its very nature, tend to be subjetive, and if handled incorrectly, will come out as offensive to the eyes of many, and then we'll have a lot of angry heated discussions about the topic. i see this as tropeworthy, but if you ask me Reed Richards Is Useless covers most of the idea (superheroes have the power to change the world and society as a whole, they don't)
  • October 1, 2012
    Twospoonfuls
    I was being slightly facetious in agreeing that this was a rant. Actually I'm not emotionally invested in what I've written here: rewrite it, discard it, incorporate it elsewhere, I don't mind. But I do think this trope is a tad more specific than the Reed Richards one in that it was the point made in HG Wells's The Man Who Could Work Miracles that being suddenly endowed with great power (or wealth) doesn't change the poverty mindset the recipient has always lived with. That's a narrower point of characterisation not covered I think by the other article.

    There is also a separate point to be made that having God-like powers doesn't allow you to change the facts of economics or human nature. But that might be a story for a different trope.
  • October 2, 2012
    Twospoonfuls
    Captainpat, cut it out! There has not been enough discussion to merit deletion without a damn good reason. One other person thinks this is trope worthy.
  • October 2, 2012
    Damr1990
    mhmmm, while i agree this could be either a Super trope or a sister trope, i also think this does not apply only to nerds, many characters or storys centered about Wish Fulfillment will be like this, the protagonist will engage on all kinds of adventures the author considers desirable but not necesarily will consider all the aplications and/or consequences of such things, they'll probably spend more time thinking on stories with oversimplified versions of his/herfriends/enemies/idols/love interest/celebrities why bother thinking about the sociopolitical consequences and uses of Time travel when your Author Avatar could kick Hitler in the balls and then go riding a velociraptor?

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=8oeodebgk7qaen1mrelgsyvo&trope=DiscardedYKTTW