Created By: bulmabriefs144 on August 25, 2012 Last Edited By: bulmabriefs144 on August 26, 2012
Nuked

PasteurWasWrong

Alternate disease origins, from the standard of being sneezed at

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No, this is not about how if you leave milk out, it will never rot. That's Indestructible Edible.

Way back at one point, Pasteur had major rivals such as Antoine Bechamp and Pouchet. Several of them are, to put it lightly, a tad resentful.

Bechamp

Bechamp held that there were substances called microzymes, which responded to environmental factors, fermenting inside the body to produce illness. In plain English, this means that a person who was perfectly healthy, would not get sick, no matter how many people sneeze in his face. Only when a person eats improper food, starves, or overeats, goes without sleep, or gets dehydrated, does one disease or another have an opportunity to infect the host or become susceptible to infection from others.

Pouchet

While some alternative medicine specialists actually believe in Bechamp, hardly anyone believes in Pouchet. This may be because Pouchet believed in spontaneous generation, the belief that life could arise from nowhere, or at the very least, life could spawn from things like compost piles and decaying matter.

While there are merits to this in the field of fermentation, it makes much better science fiction (monsters generating from nowhere, people getting sick with apparently no cause).


Bechamp Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • In Rumbling Hearts, two of the major chharacters develop a cold. One develops it by sitting outside moping in the rain, and the other one while at first seems to be aversion, had already skipped sleep due to constantly visiting a girl in a coma.
Literature

Film

Webcomics

Western Animation
  • Popeye had the title character regularly eating green veggies, and thus able to take on the resident bully. Wimpy on the other hand, ate nothing but burgers and fast food, and as a result had a weak system and wasn't capable of saving anyone.

Real Life
  • There are some practical examples of this, such as the hygiene hypothesis, which says that a sterile childhood environment can actually hinder the immune system by weakening the body's tolerance.

Pouchet Examples:

Anime and Manga

Literature

Film

Webcomics

Western Animation

Real Life
Community Feedback Replies: 12
  • August 25, 2012
    NimmerStill
    A minor point about the description, but can the doctors really be said to have "refused" to observe hygiene if they weren't even aware of why it was necessary yet?
  • August 25, 2012
    nitrokitty
    There is some truth to this, as stress, malnutrition, lack of sleep, and other such factors can suppress the immune system, making infection more likely. However, Bechamp was wrong in the cause, if not in the effect.
  • August 25, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    Wow, that was fast.

    Well, this isn't really about Bechamp being right or wrong. It's a trope, meaning it's the effect as played out in fiction.

    In answer the second question, the whole dirty implements had more to do with Pasteur. But the whole issue is taking extreme cleanliness, to well, an extreme, leading to enormous problems of its own. To say nothing of various criticisms of Pasteur, such as that he actually suppressed his rival's research. But again, not so much about rightness or wrongness any more than Lamarck Was Right is about right or wrong.

    • Although normally anime and manga are more likely to have cases of this than other works (possibly due to different cultural influences), there is a subversion in Fushigi Yuugi since Miaka mostly gets sick through the dirt and grime of the ancient world she she visits. Mostly. Getting wounded in battle against an evil doppelganger doesn't help matters, nor does the exhaustion of traveling for days in search of Dismantled Mac Guffin.
  • August 25, 2012
    NimmerStill
    ^With respect, that really doesn't answer my question. My issue is: is "refuse" really the right word here.
  • August 25, 2012
    MyTimingIsOff
    If you're admitting in your own description that most people have no clue who the hell Bechamp is, that's a sign that it's probably not a good idea to name a trope after him. (That and the fact that the "X Was Right" snowclone family is discredited.)
  • August 26, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    The reason most people have never heard about Bechamp is because he's not mentioned in any science book in school. If he is, it's a short paragraph about how he was clearly wrong, and that's that.

    The point is, the fact that he's forgotten is an Appeal To Obscurity fallacy that he necessarily is wrong. I know about him and other rivals, because I've read this[1] and this[2] (number 28).

    There aren't enough snowclones yet for this one to make it a concern.
  • August 26, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
    Snowclone is not a "killer argument" here. "Who's Bechamp?" is. "Semmelberg Was Wrong" (or whatever the proper spelling is) would be marginally better.
  • August 26, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    Dammit, now I'm gonna have to look up Semmelberg, because I don't know who he is.

    And... I can't find him under that spelling. What theory did he have, and I can probably back-reference him.
  • August 26, 2012
    SeptimusHeap
  • August 26, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    Oh. Antiseptic procedure. Well, I'm not sure this trope necessarily would be against that.

    I'm gonna call this Pasteur Was Wrong, and have it be about his various rivals, having a split between sections (Type I, II, II).
  • August 26, 2012
    Routerie
    Or, how about you name it something else entirely? All the other X Was Right pages have bad names.
  • August 26, 2012
    bulmabriefs144
    Hmmm, wow there's already a page here. So, either Bechamp Was Right (despite the obscurity problem), or we nuke it. Pasteur Was Wrong is too much like Pouchet's work.
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