Created By: longWriter on September 26, 2017 Last Edited By: longWriter on October 23, 2017
Troped

Raincoat Of Horror

A significant character in a horror work wears a raincoat

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http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/it_georgie_raincoat.png
...Yep, definitely a horror work!

Raincoats are getting to be a common in the horror genre, to the point where you can almost expect a work to be a horror, or horror elements to suddenly enter a work, by the sight of a significant character wearing a raincoat.

Perhaps it's because raincoats are often (though not always) colorful and provide a Splash of Color against the dark backgrounds common to horror, thus allowing the directors to emphasize the characters who wear them...or the blood on said characters. Perhaps it's because raincoats cover a lot of a person's body, so similar to the concealment of In the Hood, the raincoat adds a layer of mystery: there could be scales, slime, or tentacles beneath, and we'd never know until The Coats Are Off. Or perhaps it's simply because a raincoat is what a character would be likely to wear when It Was a Dark and Stormy Night, which is a common ambiance for horror works.

Compare In the Hood, Badass Longcoat, Conspicuous Trenchcoat, Trenchcoat Brigade, any of which this could possibly overlap. Contrast Exposed to the Elements, The Coats Are Off.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Daily Life with Monster Girl: Suu's body is actually liquid, and would thus soak through any clothes she tries to wear except for a raincoat. Played With, in that this is from the Harem genre with material borrowed from the Horror genre.

Literature
  • In The Secret Integration by Thomas Pynchon, significant parts of the story take place in the rain, and the child protagonists are said to be wearing raincoats.

Films — Animation
  • Coraline: One of Coraline's iconic outfits from this horror film is a yellow raincoat.

Films — Live Action
  • American Psycho: Patrick Bateman wears a clear plastic raincoat over his suit, to prevent it from being stained with blood.
  • Friday the 13th: Significant parts of this film take place when It Was a Dark and Stormy Night, and the counselors wear raincoats accordingly.
  • It (2017): Georgie becomes the prey and a form of the eponymous It on a rainy day while wearing a bright, conspicuous yellow raincoat.
  • Mimic: The insects in this horror film use their mimicry to appear like hobos dressed in dirty raincoats.
  • Unbreakable is a Psychological Thriller/ Deconstruction of the Super Hero genre, but it strays into horror territory near the end when protagonist David Dunn confronts a sadistic janitor who has invaded a family home, killed the father, and held the wife and their two children captive. David wears a long, hooded rain poncho that conceals his face for the duration of that scene. The poncho later makes an appearance in a newspaper article about his heroics, with an artist's depiction of the mysterious hooded hero who rescued the two children gracing the front page.

Live Action TV
  • Eureeka's Castle: There was a horror-themed episode that dealt with fear of movies, fear of a real monster, and pranks revolving around fear. Its opening had three rodents (puppets) scurrying around outside in a storm, screaming their heads off, running from a monster, and wearing yellow raincoats.
  • Hannibal: As a Shout-Out to American Psycho, the title character wears a clear raincoat to prevent his fine suits from being soiled during his murders.

Video Games
  • Deadly Premonition: One of this horror game's antagonists is even called the Raincoat Killer.
  • Dead Rising: In this zombie game, there's actually an enemy cult full of people who wear green masks and yellow raincoats, called "The True Eye". Why they wear masks and raincoats is never explained.
  • Little Nightmares: This game takes place in a horrific engine of child exploitation, cannibalism, and danger called The Maw, and stars a raincoat-wearing little girl named Six.
  • Terraria: There is a cosmetic raincoat-outfit available in the game, but the only way to obtain it is by killing zombies (classic horror monsters) who are wearing raincoats.

Web Comics
  • It was on a rainy night that Sadick lost his eye and his brother was murdered so they were wearing rain parkas in Charby the Vampirate.

Western Animation
  • In the Donald Duck short Duck Pimples, Donald is greeted at his door by an intimidating-looking figure wearing a raincoat. It turns out to be a jolly character looking to sell him magazines.
  • Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends: There was a horror-themed episode taking place on a rainy night, where a forbidding-looking character with a hook-hand, wearing a concealing raincoat seems to be following Frankie around. He's actually a goofy-looking imaginary friend looking for a place to stay, and he's following Frankie because he heard about Foster's.
  • The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh: In "Pooh Oughta Be in Pictures", Piglet (who has been struggling with fear the whole episode) gets spooked by a shadowy figure wearing a raincoat, which turns out to be Pooh. This scene is also shown in the theme song.
  • The Simpsons: In one Treehouse of Horror episode, Flanders turns into a werewolf, Hulking Out and destroying the raincoat he's wearing as soon as the clouds part and reveal the full moon.

Community Feedback Replies: 15
  • September 27, 2017
    darkemyst
    Web Comics
    • It was on a rainy night that Sadick lost his eye and his brother was murdered so they were wearing rain parkas in Charby The Vampirate.
  • September 27, 2017
    Kartoonkid95
    • In the Donald Duck short Duck Pimples, Donald is greeted at his door by an intimidating-looking figure wearing a raincoat. It turns out to be a jolly character looking to sell him magazines.
    • The New Adventures Of Winnie The Pooh: In "Pooh Oughta Be in Pictures", Piglet gets spooked by a shadowy figure wearing a raincoat, which turns out to be Pooh. This scene is also shown in the theme song.
  • September 28, 2017
    longWriter
    I've added the examples.

    ^ Those both look like subversions to me, but since it takes a trope for a subversion to happen, they're adding credibility to this TLP. Do you think I should have a link to Subverted Trope in one or both of them?
  • October 5, 2017
    longWriter
    I'm thinking about launching this one, if there are no objections.
  • October 5, 2017
    Leporidae
    This might be an example?

    Live Action Film

    • Unbreakable is a Psychological Thriller/ Deconstruction of the Super Hero genre, but it strays into horror territory near the end when protagonist David Dunn confronts a sadistic janitor who has invaded a family home, killed the father, and held the wife and their two children captive. David wears a long, hooded rain poncho that conceals his face for the duration of that scene. The poncho later makes an appearance in a newspaper article about his heroics, with an artist's depiction of the mysterious hooded hero who rescued the two children gracing the front page.
  • October 6, 2017
    DustSnitch
    The current description doesn't actually give a description of the trope, so it would be smart to start off the article by importing the laconic.

    Although, that laconic description would make any appearance of a raincoat, no matter how insignificantly, an example of this trope. You may want to add something to guard against that before examples come in of extras wearing a raincoat or a raincoat appearing in someone's closet.
  • October 10, 2017
    longWriter
    ^ I changed the opening to make it clear a character should be wearing a raincoat for it to count.

    EDIT: Actually, extras wearing raincoats could plausibly count as an example of this trope; the idea is that the sight of a character wearing a raincoat is indicative to the audience that we're looking at a horror work. It can reinforce the idea that the genre is horror if we already know it is, or imply shades of horror or nods to horror even if the work isn't in the horror genre.
  • October 10, 2017
    randomtroper89
    • American Psycho: Patrick Bateman wears a clear plastic raincoat over his suit, to prevent it from being stained with blood.
    • Hannibal: As a Shout Out to American Psycho, the title character wears a clear raincoat to prevent his fine suits from being soiled during his murders.
  • October 11, 2017
    longWriter
    Added those examples.

    Anything else need tightening up or adjusting before this is tropeworthy? I know technically three examples, three days, and five hats are needed, but I want to make sure I'm doing things correctly.
  • October 11, 2017
    DustSnitch
    ^^^ That's assuming too much. Fact is, the whole "raincoats=horror" thing isn't ingrained enough in the genre for any tiny appearance to really be significant. I'm still recommending tightening the description to make it so only it only describes raincoats worn by those directly involved with the horror of the movie.
  • October 12, 2017
    longWriter
    ^ I think I see what you mean. I've tweaked the description a little; please let me know what you think.
  • October 17, 2017
    Limelite
    Mimic has giant cockroaches in the subway system who use mimicry to look like shabby hobos in dirty macs.
  • October 19, 2017
    longWriter
    Any objections to me launching this?
  • October 19, 2017
    DustSnitch
    Sorry I haven't contributed to this in a while. Thank you for updating the description. Before launching, considering this is very much a visual trope, it would be smart to launch with an image. Maybe a screenshot from It?
  • October 20, 2017
    longWriter
    ^ Thanks for your help :) I've tried an image of Georgie looking down the storm sewer; what do you think?
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