Created By: ryanasaurus0077 on March 18, 2014 Last Edited By: ryanasaurus0077 on March 3, 2016
Troped

Fake Australian

A non-Australian performer doing an Australian accent (usually Broad Australian)

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Trope
So you've got an Australian character in your work. Unfortunately, the performer in question is American, British, or something else that isn't Australian. Don't worry - as with foreigners trying to be American or British, all that's needed to sell the illusion is an Australian Accent.

The specific accent is usually Broad Australian; in reality, Broad Australian is one of several different Australian accents, but it seems to be the only one which appears in popular culture, leading to a self-perpetuating occurrence of Small Reference Pools where most foreigners wouldn't recognize any other Australian accent.

It should be noted that, to Australians, many attempts to imitate an Australian accent end up sounding like London Cockney instead.

Compare Fake Brit and Fake American. Subtrope of Fake Nationality.


Examples

Fan Works
  • In an example involving imagine casting, Tsumugi from Rhythmic Pretty Cure is voiced by Emma Watson (Anglo-French) in the English version and, per Word of God, speaks with a General Australian accent (it helps that the character in question is half-Australian).

Film

Literature
  • Terry Pratchett's The Last Continent is about the Discworld Australia - but here, the accents are exaggerated and knowingly caricatured for laughs.

Live-Action TV
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus (five English, the other American) did this several times, most famously with the Bruce Sketch. In it they play a group of stereotypical Australians all named Bruce who all teach in the Philosophy Department of the University of Woolamaloo.
  • M*A*S*H. John Orchard (English) has portrayed two Australian characters on the show: anesthesiologist Ugly John in Season 1 and MP Muldoon in Season 8.
  • A girlfriend of Daphne Moon's in Frasier is an Australian model in Seattle - but played by an American actress whose Australian accent is every bit as shaky as Daphne's English one.
  • In the Poirot TV series adaptation of Agatha Christie's Peril at End House, British actors Jeremy Young and Carol MacReady play Australians.

Video Games
  • Crash Bandicoot. None of Dingodile's voice actors were Australian, and all were in fact American.
  • The Sniper in Team Fortress 2 is voiced by John Patrick Lowrie, an American born in Hawaii, and raised in Colorado. The game's accents are all designed to sound like caricatures of what 1960's Americans would imagine these accents to sound like.

Web Video
  • In Dragon Ball Z Abridged, Jeice is voiced by GanXingba, an American, to heavily parody the heavy Aussie accent he had in the Funimation dub of Dragon Ball Z. Averted with the original performance, however, as Christopher Sabat actually did live in Australia for a while.

Western Animation
Community Feedback Replies: 60
  • March 18, 2014
    daefaroth
    Live-Action TV:
    • Monty Pythons Flying Circus did this several times, most famously with the Bruce Sketch. In it they play a group of stereotypical Australians all named Bruce who all teach in the Philosophy Department of the University of Woolamaloo.
  • March 18, 2014
    paycheckgurl
  • March 18, 2014
    StarSword
    This is a subtrope of Fake Nationality, not a compare/contrast.
  • March 18, 2014
    Snicka
  • March 18, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Added the actual nationalities of the performers in accordance with the latest example.
  • March 18, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Film
    • Pacific Rim: Max Martini and Robert Kazinsky who play the Australian father and son duo, Herc and Chuck Hansen, are really American and English respectively.

    EDIT: De-potholed the title of Crash Bandicoot. Remember: always state the source.
  • March 18, 2014
    gallium
    This is understood to be Trivia, yes?

    While I for one don't specifically object to this trope, I think it's pointless, just as pointless as all the other tropes under the Fake Nationality umbrella. "Person who comes from Country X and speaks Language Y plays character from Country Z who speaks Language Y." Pointless. But as long as this is Trivia it's harmless enough.
  • March 18, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Yeah, it's meant to be Trivia. In fact, this is the second YKTTW I created that's for a Trivia page.
  • May 4, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Any other non-Australians pretending to be something they aren't (if you get the picture)?
  • May 4, 2014
    Alucard
    The Sniper in Team Fortress 2 is voiced by John Patrick Lowrie, an American born in Hawaii, and raised in Colorado. The game's accents are all designed to sound like caricatures of what 1960's Americans would imagine these accents to sound like.
  • May 4, 2014
    Chabal2
    Quentin Tarantino appears as an Australian slaver in Django Unchained.
  • May 4, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ ain't subtropes The Same But More Specific?
  • May 4, 2014
    Catbert
    I suppose next we could do Fake Ecuadorian.

    Do we really need any of these?
  • May 4, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ as long as examples are numerous enough, splitting is always okay.
  • May 4, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    ^^ And, of course, Fake Australian is much more common than Fake Ecuadorian may ever be.
  • May 4, 2014
    gallium
    Not tropeworthy, motion to discard.
  • May 4, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Why do you always think none of my YKTTW's are tropeworthy?
  • May 4, 2014
    randomsurfer
    Would voice artists playing real life Australians count? On The Simpsons and South Park celebrities Rupert Murdoch and Russel Crowe have appeared respectively, but other people have voiced them. (Maybe I'll try to look them up if the answer is yes, but I won't bother if the answer is no.)

    For that matter, in the Simpsons episode "Bart vs. Australia" The Simpsons go to Australia; several Australian characters are shown, and (I imagine) no Australian voiceover actors were used.
  • May 4, 2014
    gallium
    ^^To be honest, because they usually aren't. If I had my way Fake Nationality in general wouldn't be a trope unless it was in-universe. We certainly don't need specific Fake Nationalities for every country in the world.
  • May 4, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ it really isn't a trope per se. It's trivia.
  • May 4, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Do we need a button to alert commenters on YKTTW's that they may be Comically Missing The Point with their comments? Because gallium mistook this Trivia YKTTW for an actual trope YKTTW, and now he's probably just generalizing (Me: "Why do you always think none of my YKTTW's are tropeworthy?", gallium: "To be honest, because they usually aren't") as far as my YKTTW's are concerned.
  • May 4, 2014
    gallium
    ^^Well, as trivia, it's still boring. "This person who is not an Australian played an Australian in X." Does TV Tropes need pages for stuff like that?
  • May 4, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Arguing about whether or not trivia belongs on TV Tropes is, IMHO, more useless than Trivia pages themselves might be in the eyes of some of us here (or, as Governor Wilhuff Tarkin once said, "This bickering is pointless.").
  • Okay, here's an example I managed to think of:

    Live Action TV
    • M*A*S*H. Anesthesiologist, Ugly John, is said to be Australian, though he was played by British actor, John Orchard.
  • May 14, 2014
    AgProv
    TV:
    • A girlfriend of Daphne Moon's in Frasier is an Australian model in Seattle - but played by an American actress whose Australian accent is every bit as shaky as Daphne's English one.

    Literature:
    • Terry Pratchett's The Last Continent is about the Discworld Australia - but here, the accents are exaggerated and knowingly caricatured for laughs.
  • May 14, 2014
    StrixObscuro
    Film
  • May 15, 2014
    Folamh3
    ^ That wouldn't be an example. The character is pretending to be Australian in-universe, whereas this trope is about non-Australian actors playing Australian characters.

    As an aside, do we really need a different subtrope of Fake Nationality for each nationality? If we followed this to its conclusion it would mean having ~200 subtropes just for the sake of being exhaustive. I suggest scrapping both Fake Brit and Fake American and just redirecting everything to Fake Nationality.
  • May 15, 2014
    Arivne
    • Added blank line(s) for readability.
    • Examples section formatting
      • Added a line separating the Description and Examples sections.
      • Changed media section titles(s) to our standard style.
      • Blue Linked media section titles(s).
      • Namespaced work name(s).
  • May 15, 2014
    BaffleBlend
    Web Video
    • In Dragon Ball Z Abridged, Jeice is voiced by GanXingba, an American, to heavily parody the heavy Aussie accent he had in the Funimation dub of Dragon Ball Z. Averted with the original performance, however, as Christopher Sabat actually did live in Australia for a while.
  • May 15, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    ^^^ Only the most obvious and popular nationalities to impersonate. Fake Brit and Fake American are recognisable enough to have their own pages, as is Fake Russian. I'm not saying impersonations of every nationality should have its own page. In fact, if I didn't think impersonations of Australians were recognisable enough, I wouldn't have created this YKTTW in the first place. That said, the description may be the only thing that's been keeping the hats away.
  • June 6, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Well? Any help on the description?
  • June 10, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    While waiting for some help on the description, I added an example from Quigley Down Under.
  • June 30, 2014
    yisfidri
    Live Action TV
  • June 30, 2014
    randomsurfer
    Tropic Thunder: Robert Downey Jr plays Kirk Lazarus, an Australian method actor who is playing an African American character.
  • July 24, 2014
    ryanasaurus0077
    Could anyone offer some advice on the description?
  • January 10, 2015
    maxwellsilver
    In the M*A*S*H example, I think it should also be noted that John Orchard reappeared in season eight as Australian MP Muldoon.
  • March 26, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    Let's pay more attention to the description than to the examples; I think there's enough of them now that once the description is improved upon, the hats'll pile up for certain.
  • March 27, 2015
    Laevatein
    It should be noted that, to Australians, many attempts to imitate an Australian accent end up sounding like London Cockney instead.
  • May 1, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    Right... any more help with the description?
  • May 1, 2015
    dalek955
    • In The Salvation War, Koala Flight's squadron leader (an actual Australian) responds to Hellmouth Traffic Control's greeting with a stream of Australian stereotypes, probably with an exaggerated accent, then responds to his WSO's pained glare with "Don't blame me, that's how the Americans expect us to talk."
  • May 1, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    In other words, an Australian speaking with an Australian accent? If that is a valid example of this, then Brazil Nut Disorder is a valid trope.
  • May 1, 2015
    DAN004
    ^^ That's a subversion right?
  • May 2, 2015
    dalek955
    ^^Given the reaction of his fellow-Australian crew, and the fact that that wasn't the only thing he said to HMTC that they called bullshit on, one can assume that that isn't how he normally talks.
  • May 2, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    In that case, I don't know.
  • May 4, 2015
    LadyEvil
    • Jim Cummings has also put on an Australian accent to play Dingo in Gargoyles.
  • May 7, 2015
    wesker56
    In Dumb and Dumber 1994, Lloyd is attempting to seduce a woman at the beginning of the movie and when she says her accent is Austrian, he confuses it for Australian and gives off the worst sounding Australian accent ever.
  • May 8, 2015
    Laevatein
    Used In Universe in Mobile Suit Gundam 0080: During an infiltration, Bernie claims to be Australian. He's caught when he talks about snow during December, whereupon one of the Federation soldiers points out that it's summer in Australia.
  • May 15, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    We're getting closer. Anyone want to help with the description?
  • June 25, 2015
    Lythande
    Potential description rewrite:

    So you've got an Australian character in your work. Unfortunately, the performer in question is American, British, or something else that isn't Australian. Don't worry - as with foreigners trying to be American or British, all that's needed to sell the illusion is an Australian Accent.

    The specific accent is usually Broad Australian; in reality, Broad Australian is one of several different Australian accents, but it seems to be the only one which appears in popular culture, leading to a self-perpetuating Small Reference Pools where most foreigners wouldn't recognize any other Australian accent.

    It should be noted that, to Australians, many attempts to imitate an Australian accent end up sounding like London Cockney instead.

    Compare Fake Brit and Fake American. Subtrope of Fake Nationality.
  • June 25, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    Thanks!
  • June 25, 2015
    Lythande
    Think nothing of it~

    Ideally, all those examples with the work name at the end should be rewritten to have it at the beginning.
  • September 10, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    Any more help needed? Or does this look good enough as is?
  • October 21, 2015
    yisfidri
    Looks good to me.
  • November 22, 2015
    eroock
    Film:
    • Although the character Mad Max is an Australian, he has yet to be played by an Australian actor. Mel Gibson, the first Mad Max, although raised in Australia, was born in the USA. And Tom Hardy, the Mad Max of Mad Max Fury Road, was born in England.
  • November 22, 2015
    NoirGrimoir
    Didn't Robert Downey Jr play an Australian in another movie other than Tropic Thunder? Where he interviewed a serial killer or something?
  • November 24, 2015
    ryanasaurus0077
    Enlighten me.
  • November 25, 2015
    NoirGrimoir
    Haha! I was right! Heh, and I've literally only seen five minutes of this show too. Sorry, I'm just stupidly impressed by my own memory.

    Robert Downey Jr. does a really good Australian accent, IMO. Just makes sense he'd play more than one them.
  • November 25, 2015
    robinjohnson
    What is the The Last Continent example doing there? It's a book. There's no screen adaptation and therefore no actors to be faking the accent.

    Also, in the Frasier example: A girlfriend of Daphne Moon's in Frasier is an Australian model in Seattle - but played by an American actress whose Australian accent is every bit as shaky as Daphne's English one.

    Daphne is played by English actor Jane Leeves. Her Manchester accent is fine [edit: apparently the opinions of British listeners differ on this one, oh well]
  • March 3, 2016
    ryanasaurus0077
    OK, I'm launching this trivia item tomorrow if nobody has any further objections.
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