Created By: KhazemiElmirAmarna on July 14, 2011 Last Edited By: KhazemiElmirAmarna on August 9, 2011

Remove Your Coats

If something takes too long, the scene will shift to the end and the characters are dissheveled

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Some characters are in a room. They are trying to accomplish something; solving a puzzle, wait for something to arrive or happen, or perhaps get Homer to answer to "Mr. Thompson". To show how long they've been at this, the scene will cut ahead, and they will have taken off any coat they might have been wearing, rolled up their sleeves, or removed their ties.

Used to show an absurdly long yet absurdly dull task's accomplishment, or used more spaciously over the course of a more serious work to show the characters are getting weary; to cool off and weigh less, they have removed their coats and ties to show they are tired and don't care about looking dissheveled anymore.

See Clothing Damage and Time Skip.
Community Feedback Replies: 22
  • July 14, 2011
    ElleWednesday
    Covered by The Coats Are Off and Clothing Damage, I think.
  • July 14, 2011
    Trotzky
    2011-07-14 there was a play on Radio 4 about a Doctor Who fan who left his jacket on the train with his wallet and phone and stuff. This trauma and catastrophe would have driven him insane. Except the whole Aesop of the play was that Sci Fi fans are automatically insane already.
  • July 14, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Maybe Clothing Damage, but certainly not The Coats are Off. This refers to the coat being lost forever, and the character does not shed it for dramatic effect, nor do they get an advantage of any sort in anything.
  • July 18, 2011
    ryanasaurus0077
    The Good The Bad And The Ugly had Joe (always referred to as Blondie in this film) do this willingly when he comes across a dying soldier, swapping the Badass Longcoat he was wearing for most of the film for the soldier's poncho, which will eventually become his trademark.
  • July 18, 2011
    pinkdalek
    I really don't think this is a trope.
  • July 18, 2011
    OhNoes
    Whether or not this trope is up for debate, I have an example.

    • The Dresden Files - Harry's iconic Bad Ass Longcoat is stolen, battered, and generally defiled over the course of the series. In Changes, it disintegrates into nothing after being used as the basis for his Faerie Godmother's Gothic suit of armor. Then Harry follows it into oblivion; almost no time passes before he's literally sniped in the back.
  • July 18, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    I'm not sure if it is proper troper etiquette or not to give examples for your own YKTTW, but here are mine:

    In Resident Evil 4, Leon starts the game with a bomber coat. Early in the game, the coat is lost off-screen, never to be seen again. Subverted in that Ada later sees an enemy wearing it.

    In Jumanji (For some reason a link refuses to be made to this page...), Alan wears a tweed coat for most of the film, then removes it for no real reason near the end.
  • July 18, 2011
    TrustyGun
    In Futurmama near the end of the first episode, Leela tkes off her jacket.The only time this Jacket is mentioned is much later in the series, where the proffesser deems the jacket to be the "captain's jacket", though Leela objects, it is given to Bender,and Fry.
  • July 22, 2011
    Bisected8
    • In Trigun Vash the Stampede eventually has his iconic red Badass Longcoat destroyed. He gets a new one.
    • In New Tricks Brian is assaulted by a group of homeless who steal his coat. He later tracks them down and gets it back, only for his wife to burn it because it's become so smelly. He buys a similar looking one from the charity shop...which smells exactly like his old one.
  • July 22, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Part of the trope is that the character never gets it back. It also should be done rather inconspicuously, and is completely inconsequential.

  • July 23, 2011
    YouKeepUsingThatWord
    It is certainly acceptable to give examples for your own YKTTW, because it helps people understand where you got the idea for it.

    If you're insisting on it being inconspicuous and inconsequential, with no dramatic effect, that might make it untropable. People sometimes take off jackets in real life, and to make a trope of that, you'll have to find some meaning to taking off a jacket.

    I didn't play Resident Evil 4. Did they do anything with Ada seeing an enemy wearing the bomber coat? Like, she was all, "I recognize that," and realized that Leon was dead/evil or realized the enemy had to have been in a certain location to pick it up? (Like I said, I didn't play it, so I have no idea what Ada would determine from this.) Then what you're labeling as the "subversion" may have been the primary purpose of the jacket business.

    Also, there might be significance to the costume change that you just haven't thought of. For example, from an article on the clothing in Alien:

    http://clothesonfilm.com/alien-anthology-a-revolution-in-sci-fi-costume-design/15672/

    "As for Sigourney Weaver's Ripley ... her choice of (apparently regulation) overalls puts her closer to Ash than the accessorised 'working class' boys aboard ship, ... Ripley is a 'suit,' the one crewmember who tries to insist on following procedure by quarantining Kane (John Hurt) after his alien attack. ... Yet the longer the film goes on, the looser Ripley wears her clothes. ... partly it's symbolic. Now that she has realised exactly what kind of people she's working for, why bother with conformity?"
  • July 23, 2011
    KamenZero
    Maybe it could extend to more than just coats? In Naruto, all of the Akatsuki are shown walking around with large hats to conceal their identity, but as soon as they are taken off, they are never seen again.
  • July 24, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    You Keep Using That Word- If you examine the enemy's body after you kill him, Ada merely says, "Hey, that's Leon's Jacket. I wonder how it ended up here." and it is then never mentioned again. It was merely a developer easter egg to show fans where that jacket went; the enemy thought it was a nice, warm coat so he put it on. And I never quite thought about that bit about the hidden meaning. Interesting, I say.

    Kamen Zero- While this is more a coat trope than a hat trope, that example certainly seems to work, as it follows the same basic principles as the coat trope.

    To clarify more, it can be done in a dramatic way, but the drama must come from, say, the reveal of what is under the coat, and the (permanent) loss of the coat is not lampshaded.
  • July 25, 2011
    bbofun
    I finding it hard to see this as a trope, since it seems like a major point is that it doesn't mean anything. It seems more like something that just happens in some works, and not necessarily that often.
  • July 25, 2011
    KamenZero
    Also, could this be related to What Happened To The Mouse? except that in this case, the Mouse is a coat.
  • July 25, 2011
    Cidolfas
    Yep, sounds like it falls under People Sit On Chairs - it happens, but there is no underlying meaning to it and hence it is not a trope.
  • July 25, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Oh well. This lackluster phenomenon had been driving me insane since I first noticed it in resident Evil 4 and nobody ever mentioned Leon's coat until Ada's side story, and even then the same thing happened in other works, which.... well, then I suppose it would be, if anything, a clothing-related subtrope of [[What Happened To The Mouse? What happened to the Mouse?]]. Perhaps What Happened to the Coat? Very well, then, lads. Do what must be done, whatever that may be.
  • July 28, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    I will be retooling this to fit another thing I've noticed. If said retool happens to also be chairish or we turn out ot have it, I will abandon this YKTTW altogether.
  • July 31, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Bump for replies to the retool.
  • August 1, 2011
    Micah
    Don't retool YKTTWs; it's really confusing and it's not like there's a shortage of them. Start a new one.
  • August 2, 2011
    KhazemiElmirAmarna
    Very well, though I have a problem; I wanted to use this title, since it accurately portrays the subject using a TV Tropes flavour and I'm not sure what else will. Give me a good new title and I'll start over.
  • August 9, 2011
    bbofun
    Not certain, but I think you can just start a new YKTTW with this title (or you might have to put something like (new version" or "beta" or some such) (that wouldn't go into the title when the trope is launched, of course) and just edit this YKTTW to "No longer in consideration- please don't post here. Let it die." or the like.
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