Created By: MarqFJA on August 30, 2011 Last Edited By: Xtifr on October 28, 2012
Troped

Bizarre Alien Sexes

Very different system of sexes than the usual two.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope

Tags: Needs a Better Description

Redirects: More Than Two Sexes

Indexes: Gender and Sexuality Tropes, Bizarre Alien Biology

An alien species' sex system is very bizarre in comparison to terrestrial ones. Perhaps it has two sexes are not identifiable as either "male" or "female" in terrestrial terms, or perhaps it has three or more sexes, each of whom is indispensible for the species' reproduction process.

Of course, Earth has a few bizarre examples of its own. Some species of fungi have more than two sexes (although only two at a time are required for reproduction). There's a species of fish that only has one sex, and among seahorses, the male bears the children. But this only scratches the surface of what writers can imagine.

Supertrope of One-Gender Race. Frequently overlaps with Bizarre Alien Reproduction. May lead to Pronoun Trouble. Compare Extra Parent Conception, Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism.

Examples

Note: A lot of these are being transplanted from Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism. If you notice any other similar examples, please point them out.

Comic Books
  • Sillage has an alien species that apparently requires two "females" and a "male" for procreation.

Literature
  • The Soft Ones in Isaac Asimov's The Gods Themselves have three sexes: Rational/left, Emotional/mid and Parental/right, which reproduce by fusing their bodies together and "melting".
  • Known Space: The Puppeteers, who are already fairly strange looking, claim to have three "sexes", one of which is non-sentient, technically a different species, and serves as a host for a the embryo created by the two others. In actuality, this is a subversion. They're merely prudish about admitting that they're a parasitoid species
  • The dominant race of the Empire of Azad in Iain M. Banks' The Culture/The Player Of Games has three sexes: One is male, the 'apex' has ovaries and "a kind of reversible vagina", and the female has a womb. The only non-sexual difference between the sexes is the eugenically bred-in lowered intelligence for non-apices. Sexism here sees females as breeders and domestics, males as workhorses and disposable soldiers.
  • Bruce Coville's My Teacher is an Alien series mentions one species that requires "seven genders [sic] to produce an egg, and three more to hatch it".
  • "Venus and the Seven Sexes" (1949), a short-story by William Tenn, features a seven sexed species that passes gametes in a chain: sex 'D' receives from sex 'C' and transmits to sex 'E'. The sex of the offspring is determined by the sex of the parent which receives/completes the fully fertilized gamete. One sex is tasked with coordinating the family.
  • The Tralfamadorians from Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five claim to have five sexes; also, because they can see through time as well as space, they claim humans have seven sexes. It doesn't really make sense from the human perspective when some of the "sexes" are "male homosexuals", "women over sixty-five" and "baby". However, it could be that the other 5 sexes we don't percieve contribute to reproduction in ways we aren't aware of/can't percieve in the dimensions our senses work on. Each human would thus have 7 individuals who contributed to the act of procreation even though we can only detect 2.
  • Bob Shaw's "Warren Peace" has the Squelchers, an alien race with no less then six different sexes, each one with its own unique appearance, and with a reproductive cycle where each sex fertilizes the others in turn. The forms look so different that, to the vast majority of the universe, the species only consists of the fourth sex, which resembles an orange haired saggy sasquatch (kind of like a blown up balloon that's developed a slow leak) with multiple eyes in a ring around its head (usually covered by its fur), oversized feet that let it wade on water, and two giant red nipple-like gamete sacs positioned one above the other on its torso. The fifth sex, the only other one mentioned, is described as being indistinguishible from a tree, except for the presence of a pair of two dual-pronged ovipositors (they look almost identical to staples) sprouting from its trunk.
  • Chanur Novels: The stsho have "bizarre sexual trimorphism"; their sexes are called "gtst", "gtste", and "gtsto". If emotionally disturbed, they will undergo "phasing" and change sex as well as personality.
  • In The True Meaning of Smekday by Adam Rex, the Boov aliens who attempt to enslave the human race have 7 sexes that translate in English to: girl, boy, boygirl, girlboy, boyboygirl, and boyboyboyboy.
  • In the Star Trek novels by Diane Duane, there is one race, the Sulamid that is described as a bundle of bright purple tentacles about six to seven feet high, topped off with a sheaf of pink-stalked and tentacled eyes with triangular pupils and a purplish, "bloodshot" look. According to Dr. McCoy, they have twelve sexes, and all of them claim to be male, especially the ones that bear the children. The Enterprise has at least two of them among the crew, Mr. Athende in Maintenance and Lt. Meshav, from Data Management.
  • In Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis books, there are male and female Oankali, but the third gender Ooloi does the genetic mixing.
  • In Pier Xanthony's Cluster series, the Spicans have three sexes - impact, undulant, and sibilant - of which all three are required for reproduction.
  • The aliens inThe Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov have three sexes which roughly correspond to Superego + Ego + Id. But each triplet only has 3 children.

Live-Action TV
  • Star Trek:
    • In one of the Star Trek: Enterprise episodes there was a race that had Male, Female and a third intermediate sex ("Cogenitor"). Trip develops a friendship with the third person in a trio of aliens and had a difficult time when he finds out that the cogenitor sex is treated as an inferior.
    • In Star Trek: Voyager, Species 8472 has five sexes.
    • In the Star Trek Expanded Universe, Andorians have four sexes. There isn't any evidence of this within the Live-Action TV Canon though.
  • Alien Nation has Male + Female + Catalyst. Catalysts are very rare, but necessary somehow. Once mating has happened, the egg spends sometime in the mother's egg pouch and sometimes in the father's egg pouch.

Tabletop Games
  • The Droyne in Traveller have three sexes: Male, female, and enabler, the enablers being required to give off scent during a mating session. Droyne also are casted in the manner of social insects and each caste has only one sex. Droyne language focuses more on caste then on sex as that is more important in their psychological framework.

Video Games
  • The Grekim from the RTS Achron have three genders (octo, pharo, and sepi). They also have three 'classes' (basic, pod class, and ligo class). Any two different genders can mate to produce a member of the third gender of the same class or the next one up. E.g. a pharo and a sepi can produce an octo or an octopod, or an octopod and a pharopod can produce a sepipod or a sepiligo. This is actually the species' primary method of producing units in the game. Ligo units cannot mate (or 'progenerate'), but can 'split down' into two basic units of the remaining genders. E.g. an octoligo can split down into a pharo and a sepi.
  • Cthulhu Saves the World has party member Paws, a cat-like alien, explain that his species technically has every member as a unique gender. However, for sake of convenience, he allows the party to refer to him as "he".
  • Done with two different species in the X-Universe. The Boron have three sexes: male, female, and Lar. The presence of a Lar during reproduction is highly valued, though not strictly necessary. Meanwhile, the Paranids have eleven genders, and while not all of them are required for any individual act of reproduction, the combination of parents will affect the development of the young.

Community Feedback Replies: 81
  • August 30, 2011
    Sol9000
    • Lego Minifigures may count as either a Real Life example, or as a Toys example. They are made in a Lego Brick Factory. This is, however, only an example due to the fact that Minifigures are not humans in Lego Bricks. Your Milage May Vary if they're living things or not
  • August 30, 2011
    deuxhero
    More Than Two Sexes should be a redirect.
  • August 30, 2011
    CommanderPanda
    Male Female And Xemale Aliens? Nah.

    In your opening sentence when you mention "Three or more," aliens that reproduce asexually should also be mentioned. I want to say the Hanar do this, but it's been a while since I played Mass Effect.

    EDIT:
    "It is not known if hanar have more than one gender, or are asexual (as some jellyfish species are)."
    I guess not.

    Though I believe Asari would qualify as a one-gender race.
  • August 30, 2011
    randomsurfer
    Isn't this covered by Extra Parent Conception?
  • August 31, 2011
    PaulA
    ^ From what point of view are you defining "extra"?

    If a human has three parents instead of the normal two, that's an Extra Parent Conception. If a xczvxcian has four parents instead of the usual three, that's an Extra Parent Conception. But if a xczvxcian has three parents, that's business as usual for a xczvxcian.
  • August 31, 2011
    MarqFJA
    ^^^ Asexual reproduction and Hermaphrodite One Gender Race isn't that bizarre from a terrestrial perspective, though.

    ^ This.
  • August 31, 2011
    randomsurfer
    From Extra Parent Conception: "A child is conceived, but instead of simply mixing one male sperm and one female ovum, a third set of genes becomes involved...a child turns out to be the genetic offspring of multiple people - except, it was natural conception. " Lots of the examples on the page boil down to "Fictional species X has more than two sexes."
  • August 31, 2011
    elwoz
    The centaurs in John Varley's Gaea Trilogy have two genders in the social sense. However, their reproductive process requires only one female centaur, can involve up to five more centaurs and/or humans, and is described in great detail. With diagrams.
  • August 31, 2011
    Euodiachloris
    Perhaps a better idea would be to avoid overuse of the word'sexes' and use the word 'genders' occasionally? Just a thought, as gender and sex are not always identical: see the Ringworld example for squicky reasons why.
  • August 31, 2011
    deuxhero
  • September 1, 2011
    MarqFJA
    @randomsurfer: Then those examples should be transplanted to here.

    @elwoz: That's... certainly bizarre. Do they have actual males, in the reproductive sex sense?
  • September 1, 2011
    elwoz
    ^ They all have two sets of genitalia. One set is either male or female, and determines their social gender (Everyone Is Bi, but Varley did not explore the possibility of genderqueerness). The other set is hermaphroditic. It is possible for a female to reproduce without any male help -- the offspring is effectively a clone -- but it's unusual.
  • September 2, 2011
    MarqFJA
    So they're actually a One Sex Race of hermaphrodites, biologically speaking?
  • September 3, 2011
    elwoz
    ^ No. they do have two sexes, it's just that both have hermaphroditic "hind" genitalia in addition to their one-sexed "front" genitalia. The best Earth analog is probably the various species that normally reproduce sexually but can engage in parthenogenesis if they need to (e.g. no available males).
  • September 4, 2011
    MarqFJA
    Wait, so only the ones with the female front-genitalia have wombs/ovaries/the capability for pregnancy?
  • September 4, 2011
    elwoz
    Ovaries. If I remember correctly, "frontsex" of the any/F variety produces a partially fertilized egg, which is about the size of a golf ball, and can be used in "hindsex" to actually get pregnant. Both sexes can gestate, though.
  • September 15, 2011
    elwoz
    Minor correction -- having gotten the book out of the library, Varley's centaurs have one to four parents. Not one to six.
  • September 15, 2011
    KingZeal
  • September 15, 2011
    JonnyB
    In one of the Star Trek Enterprise episodes there was a race that had Male, Female and a third intermediate sex ("Cogenitor"). Trip develops a friendship with the third person in a trio of aliens and had a difficult time when he finds out that the cogenitor sex is treated as an inferior.
  • September 15, 2011
    Kytin
    The Grekim from the RTS Achron have three genders (octo, pharo, and sepi). They also have three 'classes' (basic, pod class, and ligo class). Any two different genders can mate to produce a member of the third gender of the same class or the next one up. E.g. a pharo and a sepi can produce an octo or an octopod, or an octopod and a pharopod can produce a sepipod or a sepiligo. This is actually the species' primary method of producing units in the game. Ligo units cannot mate (or 'progenerate'), but can 'split down' into two basic units of the remaining genders. E.g. an octoligo can split down into a pharo and a sepi.

    They generally look kinda like giant cyborg squid. They use a lot of time travel, and tend to form group minds (or something very like it). Very much Starfish Aliens.
  • September 18, 2011
    MarqFJA
    ^^^^ Varley's centaurs?
  • September 22, 2011
    Medinoc
    One may expect Exotic Equipment as well.
  • September 22, 2011
    Falco
    Sure this is covered by enough tropes already: Bizarre Alien Biology, Bizarre Alien Reproduction, Exotic Equipment etc
  • September 23, 2011
    SharleeD
    Plenty of IRL fungi have as many as seven sexes, each of which can combine genes with any of the other seven. (Note that this works better than most examples above, as it still only takes two individuals for such fungi to breed.)
  • September 23, 2011
    MarqFJA
    ^^ No, it's not. It tends to intesect with them, yes, but it's as distinct enough to be Sub Trope of Bizarre Alien Biology as Bizarre Alien Reproduction is.

    ^ And once again, Real Life proves itself to be just as capable of being bizarre as fiction can be.
  • September 23, 2011
    IuraCivium
  • September 23, 2011
    LobsterMagnus
    In the Star Trek Expanded Universe, Andorians have four sexes. There isn't any evidence of this within the Live Action TV Canon though.
  • September 23, 2011
    Allronix
    • In Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis books, there are male and female Oankali, but the third gender Ooloi does the genetic mixing.
    • An inesctoid race in the Star Wars Expanded Universe has at least a dozen known sexes. Other insectiod races vising the planet are frequetly assumed to be an exotic or rare gender type and often get propositioned.
  • October 18, 2011
    SharleeD
    Quibble: The Puppeteer example should be listed as a subversion. Their species has two sexes, male and female; they only claim to have three because they're prudish about admitting that they're a parasitoid species.
  • October 18, 2011
    Maxaxle
    a joke from Hitch Hikers Guide To The Galaxy
    Ford (About Zaphod): "He's my half-brother. Three out of five of the same fathers."

    If you don't get the joke, Zaphod thinks that half of five is three. --Maxaxle EDIT: Okay, who deleted You Fail Math Forever?
  • October 19, 2011
    pinkdalek
    Fan Wank says this is the case with the trolls in Homestuck, who reproduce via a "queen" called the Mother Grub, and so while they do have binary sexes, any combination is capable of producing offspring (so they don't even have words for heterosexuality or homosexuality, and can't understand why that's 'even a thing'). This suggests that either the Mother Grub is a third sex, or the Mother Grub is the second sex and the genders we see on the male and female trolls in canon are vestigial.
  • October 19, 2011
    SirPsychoSexy
  • October 19, 2011
    BOFH
    Literature
    • In Pier Xanthony's Cluster series, the Spicans have three sexes - impact, undulant, and sibilant - of which all three are required for reproduction.
  • October 19, 2011
    jatay3
    The Droyne in Traveller have three sexes: Male, female, and enabler, the enablers being required to give off scent during a mating session. Droyne also are casted in the manner of social insects and each caste has only one sex. Droyne language focuses more on caste then on sex as that is more important in their psychological framework.
  • October 21, 2011
    Utgardloki
    Actually, the first novel in the Cluster series is largely a tour of different planets and how they reproduce on those planets. The second novel is largely a discussion of how many descendants the hero of the first novel had, on all those planets. And the third novel featured the sexual mechanics of two different alien species as plot points. The entire series is like an examination of this trope.
  • October 21, 2011
    OneInTwenty
    Perhaps a Startrek TNG reference of this, can't remember the episode, but Riker and a gender neutral alien with female tendencies fall in love. He attempts to convert it/her only for the expected twist ending.
  • October 22, 2011
    erehwonmorf
    PerryRhodan has this in spades. Self-fertilizing with only one gender, two genders but vastly different ...um.... mechanisms for doing it, any number of three gender races, you name it.
  • October 22, 2011
    valbinooo
    Isn't this just Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism??
  • October 23, 2011
    Ninjat126
    ^ Nope. Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism is when the sexes are drastically different to one another. This is Starfish Aliens applied to reproduction: completely alien and weird from a human perspective.
  • October 23, 2011
    Trotzky
    Alien Nation: Male + Female + Catalyst. Catalysts are very rare, but necessary somehow. Once mating has happened, the egg spends sometime in the mother's egg pouch and sometimes in the father's egg pouch.

    the Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov: Superego + Ego + Id. But each triplet only has 3 children.

    Real Life: Sea Horse: The "Female" has an ovipositor = penis, she puts "her" penis in the "male's" scrotum; "she" deposits "her" egg in the "male's" ball-sack, where the semen fertisies it.
  • November 4, 2011
    MarqFJA
    ^ RE Seahorse: I so did not know that! Just when you think you've seen it all (for terrestrial marine life, at least).... XD
  • November 4, 2011
    fulltimeD
    Real Life: Not every species has only two sex chromosomes like humans.
  • November 4, 2011
    fulltimeD
    I don't think this is distinct enough from Bizarre Alien Reproduction to warrant a split but if a split does occur (as seems likely) than shouldn't examples covered by this be removed and instead listed on this (proposed) trope's page?
  • November 4, 2011
    CompletelyDifferent
    • In Real Life, some species have multiple sexes, others happen to be all female. For example, one species of fungii has 3,600 sexes, and most can fertilize most others, making reproduction very easy.
    • In Doctor Who, sex and gender in terms of Time Lords was always the matter of some debate, considering their ability to change bodies. The season six episode "The Doctor's Wife" confirmed that they aren't always the same sex.
  • November 8, 2011
    MarqFJA
    ^^ I brought the issue of whether or not it's covered by Bizarre Alien Reproduction on Ask The Tropers, and the overall consensus was "No, it should be a separate trope." And yes, those examples should be moved; in fact, much of the listed examples have been moved by me from the other article in the first days of this YKTTW.
  • November 8, 2011
    Statalyzer
    However, it is nonetheless part of the same tropes of BA Reproduction and BA Biology.
  • November 8, 2011
    Omeganian
    Ijon Tichy mentions a few cases.
  • November 9, 2011
    Statalyzer
    However, it is nonetheless part of the same tropes of BA Reproduction and BA Biology.
  • November 9, 2011
    fulltimeD
    @Marq FJA: Glad to hear it.
  • November 9, 2011
    LeeM
    • Literature: A 1970s New Worlds story, "Tubs of Slaw" by "Richard" (Rachel) Pollack, combines a story about a bunch of teenagers obtaining and experimenting with fully-functioning yet somehow detachable, stick-on genitalia, with descriptions of possible improvements to our existing genitals. It's one of those "new wave" stories that has to be read to be believed.
    • The following exchange from The Goon Show also springs to mind:
      "Segregate the sinful sexes!"
      "Wait - how many sexes are there?"
      "Two."
      "It's not enough, I say! Go out and order some more!"
  • January 24, 2012
    Arivne
    ^ x 15: @One In Twenty: That was the Star Trek The Next Generation episode "The Outcast".
  • January 24, 2012
    animeg3282
    In Lilith's Brood, the Starfish Aliens the Oankali have an odd system of reproduction. Not only do they have a third gender, the ooloi, they also exchange genetics with species totally unrelated to their own- such as humans.
  • January 24, 2012
    animeg3282
    The aforementioned book is by Octavia Butler
  • September 29, 2012
    Xtifr
    This has been languishing long enough that it can be considered up-for-grabs, so I'm going to take over, but if Marq is still around (which I think he is), and really wants it back, I won't object.
  • September 29, 2012
    MrRuano
    • Cthulhu Saves The World has party member Paws, a cat-like alien, explain that his species technically has every member as a unique gender. However, for sake of convenience, he allows the party to refer to him as "he".
  • October 1, 2012
    Xtifr
    So I re-organized it, sorted the examples and added all the pending ones that seemed to fit, and mentioned related tropes that people brought up. What more do people think this needs? Does the description need to be expanded a bit? I have some ideas along that line, but I'm not entirely sure it's required.

    More examples would be nice, but I think we've got a decent start there.

    Anything else I'm overlooking?
  • October 1, 2012
    SharleeD
    In Real Life, having many sexes is common in fungi, but generally it only takes two of any different sex to produce offspring. Actually requiring more than two mates to reproduce would probably be selected against by nature, as getting two individuals together is less difficult than three or more, and each member of a mating can pass on a bigger portion of its genome to the offspring -- the real goal of reproduction, in evolutionary terms -- with just two participants.
  • October 6, 2012
    MarqFJA
    ^^ Seems alright to me, though it could use some expansion over its current near-laconic state.
  • October 6, 2012
    Stratadrake
    So what is the distinction between this and Bizarre Alien Reproduction? Are we drawing a line where this is where aliens mate in more or less familiar-to-human terms but may involve or require more than two sexes to conceive a child, while BAR is about the truly alien methods of conceiving (like Alien? ) That seems like a bit of The Same But More to me....
  • October 6, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^ Um, the distinction is between sexes and reproduction. It's perfectly possible for a species to have bizarre sexes, but for their reproduction cycle to be basically normal (the fungi are a good example of that), and of course, it's more than possible for a species to have a bizarre methods of reproduction, but perfectly normal sexes. (I think facehuggers fall into the latter category.)

    The two tropes may frequently appear together, but neither requires the other, so neither can be called a subset.

    eta: while we're at it, I should mention: I'm leery of adding a Real Life section, just because there's so much potential for abuse and violations of the Rule Of Cautious Editing Judgement. But I did add some brief notes about real-life examples in the description. I think that's a safer approach.
  • October 6, 2012
    Stratadrake
    Agree with adding "real life" as a footnote in the description and not highlighting it as an example section.
  • October 7, 2012
    MarqFJA
    Agreed.
  • October 7, 2012
    m8e
    @Maxaxle: That was in the book right?

    In the film, radio show and I think the tv series they shared three of the same mothers. Despite this they are only semi-cousins. If Ford and Zaphod is semi-cousins how do these aliens create (semi-)brothers?
  • October 8, 2012
    Xtifr
    Oh, hey, Marq FJA! You're back? Do you want your trope back, or should I go ahead and keep running it?

    To everyone else: is there more we need here, or is it time to start begging for hats?
  • October 9, 2012
    StarSword
    I'm thinking hats.

    Got another example for you. Under video games:

    • Done with two different species in the X-Universe. The Boron have three sexes: male, female, and Lar. The presence of a Lar during reproduction is highly valued, though not strictly necessary. Meanwhile, the Paranids have eleven genders, and while not all of them are required for any individual act of reproduction, the combination of parents will affect the development of the young.
  • October 9, 2012
    MarqFJA
    We don't actually need five hats for a launch. The hats are just a rough measure that should be taken as a guideline. Would you launch a "trope" that clearly has a bad description, title, and incomprehensible examples just because a few trolls decided to give it five hats for lulz?

    ^^ I actually appreciate your efforts in improving this trope. But since I'm already around and not going any time soon, I might as well humbly ask to regain sponsorship of this trope.
  • October 10, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^ More than happy. Glad I could help. I just didn't want to see this get lost.
  • October 11, 2012
    SharleeD
    BTW, given that there are terrestrial organisms (e.g. fungi) that play this trope straight, the laconic probably ought to read "than humans" or "than terrestrial mammals".
  • October 15, 2012
    MarqFJA
    How about "than the general norm for terrestrial organisms"?
  • October 15, 2012
    SharleeD
    Alternately, "than the familiar two" would work.

    "General norm" is iffy, as the vast majority of individual organisms on the Earth are bacteria, and they don't have sexes at all.
  • October 15, 2012
    elwoz
    ^ Microbiologists sometimes describe the presence or absence of a conjugation factor in a bacterium as analogous to a sex difference, but it's a pretty fuzzy analogy (for one thing, conjugation isn't linked to reproduction, and for another, a successful act of conjugation will typically convert the recipient cell into a donor).
  • October 19, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^ I think that's more detail than this trope really needs to get into. :)

    Anyway, what's going on here? When Marq asked for the trope back, I assumed we'd be seeing a launch fairly soon. More examples won't hurt, but I think this is quite launchable.
  • October 27, 2012
    Xtifr
    Ok, I PM'd Marq, and he apologized for getting distracted, and said I might as well launch this. So this is your last chance to add any last-second examples. The trope will be launched within the next six hours.
  • October 27, 2012
    StarSword
    You need to go through the replies and add any missing examples (e.g. my X Universe entry) first. Also, do hermaphroditic species that technically only have one gender count? In which case One Gender Race is probably a subtrope.
  • October 27, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^ Most of the suggestions that aren't already included weren't included because they didn't fit, but I did miss your example, and it looks fine, so I'll do a second sweep before launching. Thanks.

    And yes, One Gender Race would be a subtrope. In fact, I'm pretty sure it was a discussion about that trope that eventually lead to this, though I may be misremembering. Anyway, I'll be sure to list it. Thanks again.
  • October 27, 2012
    Xtifr
    Ok, after review:
    • Varley's centaurs: only two sexes, example of extremely bizarre Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism, but still not this trope. (Excellent series, too.)
    • Hitchhikers Guide: Extra Parent Conception, not this trope. (Anyway, that series isn't supposed to make sense.)
    • Homestuck trolls: speculative, very dubious, sounds more like Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism to me.
    • Perry Rhodan: Zero Context Example, so not accepting it as it stands, but fine with it if someone wants to add context.
    • Asimov's The Gods Themselves, oversight, added.
    • Doctor Who: sounds more like Easy Sex Change, no suggestion of bizarre sexes, not an example as it stands.
    • New Worlds story: Detachable Penis is a completely separate trope! (And a great song!) :)
    • Goon Show: not actually an example.
    • X-Universe: oversight, added.

    I think that covers it.

    eta: given that people might want to comment on some of those, I suppose I should give this one more day.
  • October 27, 2012
    DRCEQ
    I think More Than Two Genders, not "sexes", would be a better redirect.
  • October 28, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^ No, "sexes" is the right word. Gender is entirely too nebulous a concept, and most of its definitions have nothing to do with biology. Old-fashioned folks will protest that "words have gender; people have sex." While that's no longer true (unfortunately, because it ruined a great joke), the newer meanings of gender often allow it to be quite the opposite of the biological sex, or even neutral despite any biological sex. The word "sex", especially in the plural, is clear, unambiguous, and correct.
  • October 28, 2012
    MarqFJA
    Be sure to look through Bizarre Sexual Dimorphism for any non-examples that should be on this trope instead.
  • October 28, 2012
    DRCEQ
    ^^ Ok, I honestly didn't know there there was that much... controversy about the word.
  • October 28, 2012
    Xtifr
    ^^ Ah, I thought you'd already done that. Ok, will do, thanks.

    eta: skimming it, I see some that belong on both pages as well as some that belong here but not there.
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