Created By: xanderiskander on May 17, 2013 Last Edited By: xanderiskander on July 1, 2014
Troped

Bloody Horror (Trope Repair Shop)

Playing blood and gore for horror (hats? feedback?)

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((This was revived to create trope for blood being played for fear after Body Horror went to the Trope Repair Shop))

Blood is a primal fear, which makes it, and other things you'd usually like to keep in your body, ripe for scaring people with in fiction. If someone is bleeding out you know they've been attacked or are in danger of dying, and when there's blood puddling in an everyday place you know that place is no longer safe and should fear for a character's life. This is a staple of the Horror Genre. Appearing in hauntings and Survival Horrors such as Zombie Apocalypse stories. It's also used in Murder Mysteries, and Serial Killer stories that have elements of horror.

This trope is the reason why Blood-Splattered Innocents, Blood Is the New Black and Blood-Splattered Wedding Dress are horrifying, and that fear is why Evil Is Visceral. Blood from the Mouth is often combined with Incurable Cough of Death to induce horror and signal to the viewer they should fear for a person's life.

There are many ways blood can invoke fear. Haunting stories sometimes have blood supernaturally "bleeding" and dripping down/out from furniture, and architecture, for unnaturalness and creepiness. Blood can also signify danger is nearby, and that somebody was wounded or worse killed. Murder Mysteries with horror elements have gorey murders specifically for this reason, some going beyond just blood, and showing the victim's internal organs or separated body parts. Finally blood and gore is very often used as Gross Out Horror, which also makes it pretty common in Medical Dramas, to show the character's health is declining or it's shown during surgery. Either way it signals the audience should fear for the patient's life.

There's no question, psychologically why this is the case. The fears of blood and death are very common, and most people like to keep their blood inside their body, and the rest of their body intact. This trope is why kid's show's tend to use symbolism in place of bleeding, use non standard colors for blood or just have Bloodless Carnage to get around the censors. This is because blood horror is often seen as too scary for young children.

Since this has a lot of overlap with Death Tropes, and thus is ripe with spoilers spoilers will be unmarked.

Subtrope of Horror. Related to Afraid of Blood, Blood-Splattered Innocents, Blood-Splattered Wedding Dress, Blood Is the New Black, Couldn't Find a Pen, Overdrawn at the Blood Bank, High-Pressure Blood and Evil Is Visceral. Chest Burster is a variation. Compare Paint the Town Red and Symbolic Blood. Also see Blood Magic for when blood is used for magic by ritualistic sacrifice. Contrast Bloody Hilarious, where blood is played for Black Comedy, and Bloodless Carnage where scenes where characters would normally bleed are censored to be less scary. Not to be confused with Gorn which isn't intended to make people afraid, but uses gore to "thrill" the audience instead.

Examples

Anime and Manga
  • A Certain Magical Index: On his way home Touma sees now-familiar habit-wearer Index sprawled on the floor near his apartment door. Knowing Index's appetite, Touma can expect her hunger to be the cause again, and proceeds to perhaps help her up, quickly getting whiplashed by not knowing what's with all the blood pooling under her.
  • In Another Mr. Kubodera dies by stabbing his own throat repeatedly in front of his students and causes them to be splattered by his blood
  • Attack on Titan The Titans (giants) love to play with their food (humans), and will bite off people's bodies in bits spraying blood everywhere in the process. Or even just injure humans so they bleed out and leave them to die. The scariest part is that they don't even need to eat to survive. They eat humans for fun, and just throw them up later. So all the casualties in battle are pretty much killed for no reason.
  • Elfen Lied: Lucy is frequently covered in blood after killing people with her psychic powers. When Kouta finally witnesses this in the anime it's extremely traumatic for him since he had been trying to protect her and befriended her throughout the series, and because he has PTSD from a traumatic past.
  • Eureka Seven: When Eureka discovers the "The Children" they're covered in the blood of their family that Eureka just killed
  • Fullmetal Alchemist:
    • Scar is a Serial Killer bent on revenge against alchemists. He can tear apart the alchemic makeup of his victims with an alchemic circle tattoo on his arm, often leaving bloody mess in his wake. The only real reason for him to kill the alchemists in such a bloody way, instead of disintegrating them completely, and leaving no evidence behind is the fear factor.
    • It's pretty common place whenever Fuhrer Bradley fights for him to Paint the Town Red, as well. Also for the fear factor.
    • Ed and Al's teacher Izumi coughing up blood is played for fear for her condition. It turns out the reason is because she's missing some of her organs after an attempted human transmutation.
  • Highschool of the Dead: Nearly every cast member is covered in blood at some point due to having to fight off hordes of zombies.
  • Neon Genesis Evangelion: Gendo takes control of Shinji's biomech and forces him to kill Unit 03 against his will forcing him to experience (through the mech) ripping someone apart and having blood splattered all over him. It was traumatic enough to teach Shinji to never disobey Gendo's orders.
  • Rurouni Kenshin: This is mostly invoked by the villains since Kenshi is a peaceful person who won't kill. The villains tend to kill people in very bloody ways to make a point they're horrible murderers. Although quite a few characters Cough Up Blood after sustaining heavy hits causing life threatening organ damage, making the other characters fear if they'll come out alive. The Animated film with Kenshin's backstory is also very fear inducing with it's high amount of bloody deaths, and Blood-Splattered Innocents like Tomoe.
  • Quite a few witches of Gokukoku No Brynhildr are shown to be on the run from the organisation responsible for creating them. Even eluding the more direct methods of disposal, they are not exempt from having to regularly take the now unprocurable death suppressant capsules to push back the certain gory melting to death. Your skin ruptures a bit or nose starts bleeding? Congratulations, that's an indication of entering the 5-hours final countdown stage. And if the drug supply you had is used up by now...
  • ×××HOLiC: In one story a woman makes a wish on a monkey paw and inadvertently causes a man to fall in front of a moving train. His blood sprays onto the platform and onto her shoes

Film
  • American Psycho: Patrick Bateman kills an annoying coworker which results in his face being covered in blood. Then he takes off his raincoat that was keeping his suit clean, sits down at the desk facing the coworker's corpse, and smokes a cigar.
  • The Amityville Horror: A specific part of the wall in the Amityville House's basement starts dripping blood at night, and forming, a stream leading George to it. It's revealed later on that the basement used to have a morgue, and that people were also tortured there.
  • In Italian horror films there's Lucio Fulci's City of the Living Dead which involves a girl who begins bleeding from the eyes. Followed by her intestines and stomach being ejected from her mouth. The effect is...disturbingly realistic.
  • Ghostbusters. During the scene in the mayor's office where people are describing the weird events going on in New York City, one man says "The walls in the 53rd Precinct were bleeding."
  • Indiana Jones
  • In The Machinist, Christian Bale plays an anorexic insomniac who works heavy machinery. While, working at the factory, he accidentally makes a machine rip somebody's arm off. And then, he hallucinates about a man who has an equally mutilated hand, with his thumb replaced by a toe.
  • Poltergeist:
    • There's a scene where one of the characters hallucinates ripping his face off in the bathroom, and dripping blood into the sink
    • There's another scene nearing the end of the film, after rescuing the daughter the mother and the daughter come out of the ghost's world, and fall into a bathtub full of blood.
  • One of the iconic images from The Shining is the scene with an elevator full of blood pouring out and flooding a hallway.
  • Sinister:
    • One of the characters who moves in the haunted house of the film finds a home movie titled "House Painting" in super 8 film. The home movie shows a video of a family who used to live there being cut up, and then the walls in the hallway being painted in the family's blood.
    • The advertising was pretty bloody too. With a commercial of a girl smearing blood on the walls with her hands with the film's title appearing as the blood drips on the wall.

Live-Action Television
  • House being a Medical Drama often has bleeding as a symptom both to gross out veiwers, and to fear for the patients life. Whether it be from the mouth, the eyes, the nose, ears, and other places we'd rather not think about.
  • Nip/Tuck: In one episode a woman who was put under anaesthetic could still feel and see everything going on during her operation, but wasn't mobile enough to tell the doctors. She's completely traumatized after seeing and feeling the doctors cut into her, and takes legal action over it.
  • Monk: In the episode Happy Birthday, Mr. Monk, a maintenance man named Bradley Foster goes down into a garbage compactor to fix a jam. After he fixes it the episode's murderer flips the circuit breaker. The garbage compactor turns on, Bradley falls into it, and is brutally ripped apart.
  • The Walking Dead has way too many instances of this to list all at once. But generally the bloody mess is a result of them fighting off Zombies.

Tabletop Games
  • Dungeons & Dragons module X2 Castle Amber. One of the castle's features is the Blood-Stained Arch. A steady patter of blood flows from the underside of the arch, with no apparent source. The blood is in atonement for all of the bloody crimes committed by the Amber family.

Video Games
  • Bioshock Infinite: After killing Jeremiah Fink, Daisy Fitzroy deliberately smears his blood across her face.
  • Persona 3: During the Dark Hour any water/liquid in the environment turns blood red. Blood will often be puddling on the floor and dripping off the walls during animated cut scenes.
  • Skull Girls
    • Ms. Fortune, is a pun-loving catgirl with deep scars on her body. She fights by dismembering herself along her scars, wrapping her opponents in her own sinew and muscle, spurting her blood at high pressure, and her signature gimmick: Using her own disembodied head as a weapon.
    • It's also invoked in her backstory. She got her abilities when she swallowed a stolen gem with immortality-granting properties, and was promptly butchered alive by a mafia assassin. She woke up later on the seafloor, finding her body in pieces and surrounded by the chopped-up carcasses of her friends.

Visual Novels
  • Corpse Party has a few instances of this.
    • The ghosts you encounter in the game all died extremely bloody and gorey deaths as children. For example all of them had their tounges cut out, one of them was decapitated, and one of their deaths was so morbid and graphic that the news article you originally read about the murders in omits it from the article.
    • In the first chapter you encounter blood and guts decorating a wall and the floor in the hallway. You find out in a later chapter that Mayu was killed there when she was thrown into the wall by ghosts so fast that it killed her.
  • Higurashi: When They Cry:
    • At one point Rika commits suicide in front of Shion, by holding a knife to the wall, and slamming her neck into it. It's a lot more graphic in the anime adaptation, since it's only described in the visual novel.
      • Similarly many other suicides involve the victims mysteriously scratching open their own necks with their fingers.
    • In Hinamizawa there's a ghost story about an old village ritual (that's used for some of the murders) that involved the villagers disemboweling the victim as torture, and showing them their own guts on the day of the yearly festival.
  • Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors
    • At the beginning of the game the Number Nine Man enters a numbered door by himself and explodes because of small bombs placed in his stomach, foreshadowing the rules for the nonary game. You have to walk past a bloody puddle of his remains if you chose to go through that door. Later on another man dies in a similar way when being thrown into the number 3 door by himself.
    • This game infamously has a number of bloody deaths for bad endings. Especially during the axe ending where Clover becomes literally Axe Crazy and brutally murders several people.
  • Umineko: When They Cry
    • There are multiple instances of what appear to be ritualistic "magic circles" being drawn in blood.
    • There's multiple cases of murders that involve bashing people's faces to so that they're so bloody, that it's impossible to recognize who it is.
    • The disembowling in Higurashi makes an encore in Umineko, on the first twilight (murder) of the second arc leaving blood and guts all around the crime scene. Played for horror again since they were sitting at a party table when they were found.
Community Feedback Replies: 33
  • May 18, 2013
    Arivne
    Film
    • Ghostbusters. During the scene in the mayor's office where people are describing the weird events going on in New York City, one man says "The walls in the 53rd Precinct were bleeding."

    Tabletop Games
    • Dungeons And Dragons module X2 Castle Amber. One of the castle's features is the Blood-Stained Arch. A steady patter of blood flows from the underside of the arch, with no apparent source. The blood is in atonement for all of the bloody crimes committed by the Amber family.
  • May 18, 2013
    xanderiskander
    I actually wanted it to be more of "blood and other types of gore played as scary". Blood in a place it shouldn't be is one type of way to play it that way. But there's also cases like the bathroom scene in poltergeist, where one of the characters starts ripping his face off.

    I also wanted to include things like organs being ripped out, and missing body parts from a corpse.

    editing the description to broaden it.

  • May 18, 2013
    Arivne
  • June 1, 2013
    xanderiskander
    I remember blood being played for horror in the Elfen Lied anime, but it's been awhile since I've seen it and I don't remember exactly how it happened. If anybody can write up an example they remember that'd be great.
  • June 1, 2013
    KingZeal
    This trope is used often in a Zombie Apocalypse story. One of the most unnerving things about that type of story are visible signs that everyday locations that most people take for granted are no longer safe.
  • June 1, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Um, isn't this pretty much Body Horror?
  • June 1, 2013
    xanderiskander
    No. To quote Body Horror: "Simply put, this is any form of Horror that is based primarily on the body visibly mutating and developing in out-of-control, hideous ways." Body Horror is basically someones body transforming into something horrible and terrifying.

    They both involve the body and are played for horror, but they're very very different.
  • June 1, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Nope, I'm pretty sure Body Horror covers all sorts of mutilation (or at least that's how it's used).
  • June 1, 2013
    xanderiskander
    The laconic says "Your body is mutating into something horrible". And the description only talks about transformations. It says nothing about blood or gore or the like being played as horror. If it's being used that way it's probably being misused because people are misunderstanding that trope based on it's name.
  • June 1, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    ^ Now that I think about it, it might be that Body Horror is actually just misused a lot, and this trope would be the one to help fixing the situation.
  • June 11, 2013
    xanderiskander
    I've Seen This A Million Times, and I know this is tropeworthy. What do I have to change to gather a few hats?
  • June 11, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Well, you could add that this trope is the reason for the existence of Evil Is Visceral.

    EDIT: Also, not to be confused with Gorn, where the violence is played for excitement rather than horror.
  • June 23, 2013
    xanderiskander
  • April 15, 2014
    Scorpion451
    Giving this one a bump now that Body Horror has been upgraded to a supertrope. I tentatively suggest changing the name to Bloody Horror, even if it does toe the line of a Snowclone just because it has such a good ring to it, and it'd be easier to fit into sentances than Bloody Horrifying.

    With a little tinkering this one is a shoo in. If you want a bunch of ready-to-go main body and examples, check out Afraid Of Blood, and strip mine it. That one is supposed to be about people fainting or freaking out at the sight of blood, but because this trope is missing every thing that belongs in this missing trope is being put there instead.

    I'd suggest describing the trope this way: Playing blood for horror. Short, simple, and focused, but covers a pretty wide range of ways that it can be played for horror.

    EDIT: Derp, Had Afraid Of Blood confused with The Power Of Blood for the one needing to be strip mined but otherwise the ideas the same, stuff in the wrong place because there is no place for it.
  • April 15, 2014
    Az_Tech341
    I second Bloody Horror. Does that make Afraid of Blood an in-universe sub-trope of this one?
  • April 15, 2014
    Scorpion451
    Definitely related, but wouldn't call it a sub-trope, more of a sister trope.
  • April 15, 2014
    arbiter099
    • One of the iconic images from The Shining is the scene with an elevator full of blood pouring out and flooding a hallway.
  • April 15, 2014
    DAN004
  • April 19, 2014
    Scorpion451
    Overdrawn At The Blood Bank is a good related trope, and mentions a whole bunch of other tropes and examples. High Pressure Blood is especially notable.
  • June 18, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
  • June 21, 2014
    xanderiskander
    I could still use some more hats and examples. This is common enough that I know there have to be more examples of this. I'd bet there's some instances of blood horror in Dexter. I've never seen that show though. There are probably a lot of horror movies that I've never seen that use blood to scare people too.

    And if it doesn't deserve five hats yet I'd like some feedback on why.
  • June 23, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    What I don't like about descriptions (regardless of the fact i'm not throwing hats around yet) like this is their "literaturological" all-knowing approach. It's, like, saying, "Come on, examples where author put blood in to spook you, go here." And I, as the reader, look at this and think, "How in the blue hell should I know what author intended?!" Maybe I'm not scared of rivers of blood, I'm more scared of his poor story passing the press, humanity is in danger.

    How would you discern a "blood for horror" from general "violence for horror" or "mutilation for horror", or "stab for horror", or "injury for horror", or "dismemberment for horror", or "just another unexpected illness symptom for horror", or "ahh, yes, something like that is expected now that you're surely dying for horror"?

    On that note, I think two things might be worth mentioning. One is that bleeding, regardless of mother Nature intentions, is used as a signal system. Another one is pain. You were sewing, *Wham* you feel pain, you see the blood. Shite, hurts like a witch, where's my first aid kit. Need to disinfect, bandage, in bad cases get a few stitches at a clinic. It's sure not a situation you strive to get in, but it's okay. Yet when you bleed from somewhere and there's no pain, no condition, no history, that's still sure means something is very wrong, but you don't know where, why and what does it mean, what should you do. And because it didn't hurt, you could be too late noticing the bleed that didn't hurt.

    Another one is a Message written in blood. Maybe people just don't like to explore that way that much. Bloody messages are not dramaticized there it looks like. But they didn't even have that example of Sideshow Bob writing death threats to Bart Simpson in blood. Overly enthusiastic about it, he passes out in his jsil cell from anemia, his cellmate yelling at him to use the freaking pen.
  • June 23, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Maybe it's just the fact that people get terrified of blood? See Afraid Of Blood.
  • June 24, 2014
    xanderiskander
    Well to start off I think I've done a good job in the description in saying that blood is used a signal system for danger. It says that it signals something is very wrong at least twice. And you're being too literal about the violence and gore bit. If there's blood involved it can still be played for Bloody Horror.

    Now on to the more complicated bits

    How would you discern a "blood for horror" from general "violence for horror" or "mutilation for horror", or "stab for horror", or "injury for horror", or "dismemberment for horror", or "just another unexpected illness symptom for horror", or "ahh, yes, something like that is expected now that you're surely dying for horror"?

    Blood and gore in general is used for horror because it's a common fear. So DAN has that right. But we also have pages like GORN where it's not used for horror, but to thrill. So here are some other ways we can tell:

    • What genre is the work in?:
      • Is the work itself a horror, murder mystery, medical drama supernatural drama? Then it's likely being used for horror.

    • How do the characters react to it?:
      • Is the character bleeding out scared for his life? Is the character dying? Did someone scream or cringe when finding he's bled to death? Did someone find blood, but can't find the body? Odds are it's being used for horror, or at least being played for a creepy factor

    • Is the way the scene plays out deliberately over the top and morbid seemingly just for the sake of it?
      • It's likely they're not being morbid just to be morbid. It's to scare the viewer. This is especially true in literature if the author deliberately goes out of their way to describe the scene in graphic detail.

    And yes bloody symptoms like Incurable Cough Of Death count (which this would be a Supertrope to) if they're coughing up blood. The reason is because it's not just a regular illness. It signals the character is in danger. It's deliberately used so the audience fears for the character. So Soap opera examples where this happens would count.

    Heck they don't even have to be dying. The bleeding just has to indicate danger for the character. For example in House a lot of characters survive in the end of the episode, but symptoms of bleeding always mean their health is taking a turn for the worst, so the audience is fearing for the patient because they want the patient to be okay in the end.
  • June 27, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi

    ^ Let's rephrase. I don't see a solid insurance against shoehorns via two mechanisms. "Matryoshka" and trivia/ymmv.

    Trivial blood which is not scary unless you're Afraid Of Blood (phobia-level).

    YMMV for mild, middle-ground cases, like, perhaps, neutrally eerie rather than horror. One guy will write his favorite show, claiming he was spooked (if need comes to be). Others will see it as an instance of nobody caring, losing the will to contribute, and/or see Trivial blood worth as much as anything else.

    Matryoshka comes to mind because I can imagine a very same scene being listed in a chain of the tropes pages equally and simultaneously (not "rightfully"). If the scene is beyond doubt scary, but the blood presence is justified by more or less realistic detailing of a complex horror trope, I don't think the scene needs a repeating mention at both pages. Only at the more complex one, to avoid cluttering. You very much look like you would disagree. If you do disagree, the paragraph about blood-splattered this and that in the description will contradict things (why haven't this trope candidate copied all the played for horror examples from Blood Splattered Innocents yet?). Either way, description needs to state its standing on this YMMV/Trivia/Matryoshka inclusion criteria clearly, not as indirectly as the just-mentioned paragraph.
  • June 27, 2014
    xanderiskander
    I really have no idea what you are trying to say with a lot of this because your phrasing is highly confusing. But there's no such thing as "trivial blood". Unless it's like a paper cut or something and is never mentioned again which nobody is going to list that anyway because that kind of thing is so mundane they're either not going to even remember it or if they do they'll know it's not intended for that. That kind of example is so rare that it's not even going to be an issue.

    Characters don't bleed out for no reason in a work, and there's no "middle ground". In fiction blood is either used for high stakes violence, to play for fear, gross people out, or to excite and arouse. There's always a reason for it. If there wasn't it wouldn't be there at all.

    And "slightly eerie" blood would be a Downplayed Trope, not a shoehorned one. That totally belongs in the examples because Children's shows and old timey censored shows aren't going to allow a work to use extremely graphic blood to scare people (when they allow blood at all).

    Finally just the fact that blood is censored at all for being too scary is telling enough that 99% of the time it's intended to scare people.
  • June 29, 2014
    Scorpion451
    I think this is a case of several people saying the same thing in several different ways:

    • What nemurumaeni is saying: Blood is not always played for horror.
      • Very true. Most Action Survivors end up with at least a little battle damage, and surgery doesn't have to be played as horror. This trope, however, covers cases where it is explicitly played for horror- its all about the context. I also agree that Blood Spattered Innocents and Couldnt Find A Pen are without a doubt Subtropes of this one.
    • What dan004 is saying: Blood is a Primal Fear.
      • Even a jaded ER surgeon used to seeing blood constantly is going to find the Shining's elevator full of blood at least a little bit disturbing, because it simply isn't right.
    • What xanderiskander is saying: If a work goes out of its way to involve blood when it doesn't have to, it's probably playing it for horror.
      • Agree, this is one of those "You know it when you see it" tropes, but there is middle ground- First Blood in a fight sequence, any of the Standard Bleeding Spots,a flesh wound with a bloody bandage over it, or the state that an Action Survivor usually ends up in would not be this trope. Again, its all about context.

    Also, make sure you keep the distiction between Horror and played for fear- clowns can be played for fear, but a Monster Clown is horror. If something is Horror, its inherently disturbing, with no room for YMMV.
  • June 29, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ maybe "for fear" you mean "to thrill".
  • June 30, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    ^^ Isn't it contradicting? This candidate has to be for horror while its alleged subtropes can be for things other than horror? Isn't it something more like sister in form, not sub-trope?

    ^^^ Regarding my being unclear. I wanted you to think over one thing. Why is "Afraid Of Blood" a trope? And not People Sit On Chairs. Because it's not a given, people do not just normally feel fear at any and every sight of blood. From there it's a walk in the park to wry smiles about how single-minded current description is.
  • June 30, 2014
    DAN004
    Afraid Of Blood is about in universe ppl being afraid of blood. It is possible for those ppl being afraid of blood in blood donor packs, for example.
  • June 30, 2014
    xanderiskander
    ^^ Afraid Of Blood is a character trait. It's when a character is extremely squeamish about any sight of blood to the point of ridiculousness. Dan's example of being afraid of blood in donor packs is a good example.

    And what are you complaining about? While I don't see why a horror trope couldn't have a nonhorror subtrope, if you actually read what I wrote it's not listed that way anyway. You'll notice that the only time it mentions the word "subtrope" in the description is when it says Bloody Horror is a "subtrope of horror". Some of the related tropes are subtropes of this like Blood Splattered Innocents and Blood Is The New Black, but some them aren't (necessarilly) like Overdrawn At The Blood Bank, and High Pressure Blood. That's why it's under related tropes, because that's a term broad enough to cover both subtropes, variations and sistertropes. And in cases like Symbolic Blood or Bloody Hilarious they're under "compare" or "contrast".

    Would adding a paragraph like this help at all with making the point that it has to be explicit horror?

    Keep in mind that when blood and gore is being used for horror is all up to context. Generally you'll know it's being used for horror when you see it. For example An Action Survivor suffering battle damage is not by itself necessarily horror. If that damage causes them to get close to dying or (as an extreme example) become catatonic and unable to fight back that's horror. Character reactions and the genre of the work are also good indicators of whether it's being used for horror or not.
  • July 1, 2014
    NemuruMaeNi
    If they are subtropes, then they are not listed as such to avoid being too concise? (nevermind the fact that they aren't, and subtropes HAVE TO inherit, retain all the of the supertrope required-constituents, by definition. A wild guess, would you call indices just a sort of minimal-description supertropes? If yes, then don't.)

    I can't comment much on adding more paragraphs. The ones already in place have too many parts that can't be agreed with. Frankly, it just feels like I'm to disqualify the visible author behind the description and go by keywords of this trope. It looks like a work of a person who dislikes the sight of blood very much, knows for certain that you can't be calm about blood and that person justifies himself. It could be nice for a kind of exaggerated introduction, but it stays throughout the text. The all-knowing tone is wrong for text full of opinions, it's right for text full of facts.
  • July 1, 2014
    xanderiskander
    subtropes HAVE TO inherit, retain all the of the supertrope required-constituents, by definition.

    No they don't. You have no idea what you're talking about. They have to have some of the same elements to be subtropes, but they do not need all of them. They wouldn't be called subtropes if they were required to be the exact same trope. For example Bloody Horror was revived to create a subtrope for Body Horror. Body Horror is not caused by immediated violence or gore, it's when the body is distorted unnaturally for horror. But Bloody Horror is still a subtrope, because they both involve body parts being horrifying. They just involve them in different ways.

    I tried making a compromise, you don't agree with it, (which is fine) but you won't point out anything specific that you have a problem with or give any constructive feedback to help fix it. Instead you go and claim that the whole thing is wrong somehow.

    If you won't give me any constructive feedback then I can't do anything to fix it. This discussion will just end up going around in circles. So since this has five hats I'm just going to launch this.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=5efyyisvj4231ws1q4l7og7j&trope=BloodyHorror