Created By: TheCartoonist on September 28, 2009
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Paper People

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This is when a character is paper-thin, as if they were a paper cutout. This can also apply to normally 3-dimensional characters who have been flattened as a result of, say, a 300-pound weight being dropped on them. Not ot be confused with Flat Character. Needs a Better Description. Up for Grabs

Community Feedback Replies: 50
  • September 24, 2009
    Oonerspism
    • Paper Mario, where everyone is literally a paper cutout.
  • September 24, 2009
    Daku_Hammerfist
    Interesting. Does this apply to normally 3-dimensional characters who have been flattened as a result of, say, a 300-pound weight being dropped on them?
  • September 24, 2009
    Cidolfas
    One of the Ptaclusp IIs (the accountant) in Pyramids winds up like this.
  • September 24, 2009
    arekuru
    Daku_Hammerfist: I'd think so, since that's how Flat Stanley got flat in the first place.
  • September 24, 2009
    Yrf
    Flatland... sort of.
  • September 24, 2009
    Durazno
    There's also Marvel Comics' astounding Flatman.

    Would the protagonists of Flatland count? I mean, they're just polygons, but they do exist on a plane in a 3 dimensional universe.
  • September 24, 2009
    STUART
    The Judge in Who Framed Roger Rabbit after getting run over by a steamroller.
  • September 24, 2009
    random surfer
    There's the "joke"
    What do you call Batman and Robin after they've been run over by a steamroller?
    Flatman and Ribbon.
    Marvel Comics' Hawkeye mockingly asked Flatman (the one mentioned by Durzno) "Where's your partner Ribbon?" when they first met.
  • September 24, 2009
    foxley

  • September 24, 2009
    Evalana
    In one episode of Magical Play, characters from the animated version wind up in the CGI version and appear totally flat, and without any backs (i.e. a painted cel)
  • September 24, 2009
    Bisected8
    The Dennis The Menace UK animated series had "Two Dimensional Man" as a villain on his favorite TV show. He was apparently flattened by a steam roller.
  • September 24, 2009
    melloncollie
    A Wrinkle In Time - The characters are briefly transported to a 2-dimensional planet.
  • September 24, 2009
    Generality
    • Calvin once imagined he had become two-dimensional, allowing him to escape notice by turning sideways.
    • A recent advert for the 3-D version of Toy Story turns all the characters three-dimensional, except Dinosaur, who falls over.
  • September 24, 2009
    idledandy
    There was a Batman episode where Batman, Robin, and Batgirl got flattened by the villains. Then they slipped them under Commissioner Gordon's office door, I think. Commissioner Gordon had to call Alfred to restore them.
  • September 24, 2009
    TB Tabby
    Kate Moss appeared this way on Family Guy.
  • September 24, 2009
    Lee M
    The unfortunate Joe Fonebone in a Mad Magazine strip by Don Martin is found by his friends after being run over by a steamroller. His friends fold him up neatly into a foot-square package so they can carry him to hospital. Even more unfortunately, before they get there a nearsighted strongman mistakes him for a phone book and tears him in half.
  • September 24, 2009
    Harry Miste
    A minor example: Teddie from Persona 4 gets this treatment after his Shadow fight. He gets better.
  • September 24, 2009
    Yin
    4-D from the Ultramarines was able to become 2-dimensional.
  • September 24, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    You may wish to change the title, in case someone wants to write an article about the book.
  • September 24, 2009
    Shini
    Look Ma Im 2D ?

    I believe a Steve Martin sketch mentioned briefly in the nightmare fuel write up counts, would anyone like to confirm?
  • September 24, 2009
    CAD
    New title? First one that comes to my mind is Pancake Anatomy.
  • September 25, 2009
    TheChainMan
  • September 25, 2009
    Dick Richardson
    Yes, he counts. When clones of him are encountered piloting a big-ass enemy ship in Brawl's SE mode, they all do the same thing Paper Mario does when they turn.
  • September 25, 2009
    KJMackley
    Most stretchable superheroes are able to flatten themselves this way. Mr. Fantastic and the Batman Beyond Expy 2D Man.

    There is also the "Reedman" nanobot thing from Transformers Revenge Of The Fallen. Literally razor thin and almost invisible from a certain angle.
  • September 25, 2009
    Goldude
    The 2000 movie version of Violet of Charlie And The Chocolate Factory is seen like this near the end of the movie.
  • September 25, 2009
    random surfer
    Former Chicago PBS series Image Union had "Bob," a paper cut-out character, as a mascot; in the opening he walked down the (otherwise live-action) street, went into a house (later a video store), sat down, and turned on a TV with a remote.
  • September 25, 2009
    Arivne
    Tabletop RPG
    • Dungeons And Dragons had the Duo-Dimension spell, which reduced the target to two dimensions (height and width) by deleting depth. The recipient could pass through narrow spaces and become invisible by turning sideways.
  • September 25, 2009
    EricDVH
    Everyone in the Paper Mario games, of course.

    In ancient Macintosh lore, there is a beast known as Clarus, a dogcow. Since she is made of pixels, it's said she can vanish entirely from sight by facing one head on.
  • September 25, 2009
    handel
    In the olden style cartoons, this was used all the time for great comedic effect, i.e. washing boards/irons to the face.
  • September 25, 2009
    Lee M
    This is even Fetish Fuel to some. This Troper recalls one of the milder examples, involving a girl who wants to be a model but ends up flat inside a magazine photo.
  • September 25, 2009
    Tomtitan
    The Simpsons Did It, naturally. In one episode Lisa becomes weight conscious and she sees a video of a child model. When the model turns to her side, she dissapears, implying that she's so thin she's two-dimensional.

    • In Fosters Home For Imaginary Friends Duchess is arguably an example of this. When she turns around she appears to be flat. Although this is a cartoon, so it's hard to know for certain.
  • September 25, 2009
    Some Guy
    Just Launch It Already!

    Up For Grabs, in case y'all forgot. I might do it myself, someday.
  • September 25, 2009
    Tomtitan
    @The Duchess example: I think I didn't explain it very well. It's not lazy animation since that's not the case for any other character, it's just that since it's a cartoon most of the time we only see a two-dimensional drawing of her which we assume to be 3D (as is the nature of animation), so it's hard to know if she really is this trope or not.
  • September 25, 2009
    Antigone
    Another Tabletop Games example would be Origami Girl from "Golden Age Champions". (I think that's the correct name, I'll dig out the book and doublecheck.) Her powerset is based on being able to transform into a sheet of paper.
  • September 26, 2009
    Teeth
    Sam And Max undergo this at one point, in order to get under a locked door to obtain a Super Mario Bros styled coin.
    • Max: Lose weight AND make money? Where do I sign up?
    • Sam: I dropped a whole dimension and I've never felt better!
  • September 26, 2009
    Micah
    • In Borgel by Daniel Pinkwater, the main characters pass through a "two-dimensional plane of existence" where everyone becomes like this temporarily.
  • September 26, 2009
    Citizen
    Please, just find a better name than the OP's first.
  • September 26, 2009
    Worlder
    Where to do flatworms fit in all this?
  • September 27, 2009
    Some Guy
    The Cartoonist, I have a question. If you're going to use Rolling Updates, what's the point of even having this Up For Grabs in the first place? You do realize that the entire point of Rolling Updates is so that you, the launcher, only have to cut and paste the original post into the final product, right?
  • September 27, 2009
    Ryusui
  • September 27, 2009
    Nate the Great
    Um, is this people who are always two-dimensional, or those who can become two-dimensional? We seem to have examples of both, and it seems to be two separate tropes. Natural state versus superpower, so to speak.
  • September 27, 2009
    TheCartoonist
    Both.
  • September 27, 2009
    Unknown Troper
    Rare bad guy example. The super thin ''Reed Man' razor robot from start of transformers:ROTF
  • September 27, 2009
    JoieDeCombat
    Another bad guy example from DC's Legion Of Super Heroes comics: Ron-Karr, aka Flat Lad. In the cartoon he's adapted into a more versatile shapeshifter, but in the comics, he has one ability: becoming flat.
  • September 28, 2009
    Deboss
  • September 28, 2009
    Stormtroper
    An episode of Cow And Chicken and Sponge Bob Squarepants features evil literal-paper versions of Chicken and Spongebob
  • September 28, 2009
    BlackDragon
    I remember a one-off villain in Inuyasha who was like this - some sort of Origami demon, who stole valuables by slipping through cracks in a storehouse, and turned invisible by turning sideways. 'course, Inuyasha got 'im anyway, and he turned out to not REALLY be all THAT bad a guy..
  • September 28, 2009
    Nate the Great
    Seriously, this issue needs to be resolved. People who are two-dimensional all the time and people who can temporarily become flat are two different things.
  • September 28, 2009
    Some Guy
    We could launch now and split later. Or somebody could just make another YKTTW. Come on, let's go already.
  • September 28, 2009
    Dracomicron
    I don't recall how he fits into this trope, but Little Jackie Paper was a paper boy in in Puff The Magic Dragon.

Three days must pass before this YKTTW is Launchworthy or Discardable

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