Created By: hbi2k on July 31, 2013 Last Edited By: hbi2k on August 4, 2013
Nuked

Master of All

When a character, unit, or weapon is exceptional in all areas / combines all specializations.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
To specialize or generalize? That is the question. When your generalist can't stack up to the specialists, you've got a Master of None. When the weaknesses of your specialist render it worthless, you've got Crippling Overspecialization. Sometimes a generalist can retain its usefulness through sheer versatility, in which case you've got a Jack-of-All-Stats and/or Jack-of-All-Trades... but still not a master.

But what if you didn't have to choose?

What if you could be, not merely average, but world-class... at EVERYTHING?

The strength of the Mighty Glacier, without the slowness. The speed of a Fragile Speedster, without the fragility. The mojo of a Squishy Wizard without the squish. The stopping power of a Glass Cannon but Made of Iron.

Master of None, Jack-of-All-Stats / Trades, and Master of All are related tropes. Each describes a generalist character type, bad/good/great at everything. While the Jack might be good enough at any skill, the Master of All is rarely outclassed, usually only by someone with a Crippling Overspecialization.

Importantly, a character, weapon, or unit does NOT have to be overpowered, a Game Breaker, invincible, or unstoppable to count as this. Nor does it have to be THE best in every area to qualify, just top-tier. To qualify, it must:

1.) Be top-tier (not necessarily the absolute best, but in the ballpark) in every relevant skill or specialization in the setting.[[labelnote:Note]]"The setting" is defined as the scope of the work, so for a work set in a hospital the Master of All would need to be a master surgeon, diagnostician, lab tech, pharmacist, nurse, chemotherapist, administrator, and have a good bedside manner. In a series set in a software company, the Master of All has to be able to build servers, lead projects, write code in every computer language, have access to all of the files, hack, block hackers, and turn viruses against themselves. And so on.[[/labelnote]], roughly equaling or outperforming even dedicated specialists.

and,

2.) Lack any major weaknesses or drawbacks that would make using a specialist preferable.

Likely to overlap with All Your Powers Combined. Sometimes a result of rampant Power Copying. Where game balance is a concern, nearly always a Game Breaker, unless it's a Guest Star Party Member, A Taste of Power, or otherwise Awesome but Temporary. If the computer is this but the player cannot be, it's because The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard. Often a Secret Character or other Unlockable Content. May only be available in a New Game+. Most Infinity Plus One Swords are this in settings where weapons have stats besides "Attack." Likely to be a Lightning Bruiser, Genius Bruiser, and/or One-Man Army. Needless to say, always some flavor of Badass.

Compare Game Breaker and The Ace, which are similarly powerful but may be specialized, and The Omnipotent, which are often (but not always) this by default. Compare and contrast Jack-of-All-Stats / Jack-of-All-Trades, a generalist that is not top-tier in any given area. Overlaps with Lightning Bruiser, which combines three specific specializations but not necessarily all available in the setting. Arguably a Super Trope to God-Mode Sue, which is a particularly overpowered Master of All in a setting where everyone else is a Master of None and The Load by comparison. Contrast Master of None.


Examples:

Driving Game
  • Minion, the Secret Character in the Twisted Metal games, is usually this, with top-class speed, handling, and armor plus a badass superweapon. His only (slight) drawback is his size, which makes him a larger-than-average target.
  • The Golden Kart in Mario Kart: Double Dash!! has the best combined stats of all vehicles. Some are better in one stat but lower in the others (Bowser's has highest top speed, but takes a while to get there).
  • Super Sonic in Sonic R has perfect stats across the board.
  • In the PAL version of Crash Team Racing, the cheat-only character Penta Penguin has perfect scores in all stats. When it comes to the race itself, though, he's often tiered lower than the high-speed-low-handling characters, due to how power-sliding works.

Eastern RPG
  • Ash, the protagonist of Vandal Hearts, starts out as a very competent and useful Jack-of-All-Stats and Magic Knight, and becomes this trope in spades if you manage to unlock his gamebreaking, Purposefully Overpowered Vandalier class, which is a Lightning Bruiser that can cast every spell in the game.
  • The Majin class from the first Disgaea game. Very high stats all across the board, positive Aptitudes for all stats, very proficient with all weapons, and high mobility. There is no reason to use anything else when you have unlocked this class (though it requires a bit of a Guide Dang It). The subsequent games nerf this class severely, though. The second game reduces its mobility to the minimum, making it somewhat of a Mighty Glacier instead. The third and fourth games take it even further, giving it low aptitude above the low mobility, and no weapon proficiency, making the class require a lot of work to even be remotely playable.
  • A sufficient amount of Level Grinding can yield this in most JRPGs with a Job System, such as Final Fantasy Tactics, Dragon Quest IX, and Blue Dragon.
    • Dragon Quest VI has a particularly spectacular example in that changing class affects only your stats, while spells are determined by the class's rank, itself depending on the number of battles you've fought. However, spells stay with the character once learned even after subsequent class changes, which can lead to situations like the Mighty Glacier throwing healing spells or the Squishy Wizard launching physical attacks, and doing quite well at both.
  • In the Pokemon games, the Mew-clones are this with 100 as a base stat across the board and typically able to learn an incredibly wide variety of moves. Mew in particular can learn every teachable move in the game.
    • Arceus takes this even further, having 120 base stats across the board, capable of learning every teachable move (except moves that explicitly require hands due to being a Marvelous Deer) and has an ability that allows it to change into any of the 17 Elemental Rock-Paper-Scissors Types.

Fighting Game

First-Person Shooter
  • In Call of Juarez: Gunslinger, by the end of New Game+ the player should be able to max out all three skill trees and become a master of all three combat disciplines. This creates some weird synergies that allow you to do things like performing six or more consecutive headshots on distant enemies in the span of a few seconds while using a sawed-off shotgun that only has two shells in it. It really helps to emphasize the Unreliable Narrator nature of the story.
  • The RCP-90 in Goldeneye 1997 was incredibly powerful (its power was only matched by cheat weapons and explosives), had one of (if not the) highest firing rate in the game, and had the largest ammo capacity to boot. To top it off, it used the single most common ammo in the game.

Tabletop Games
  • With no hard cap on creature Power and Toughness stats and far too many powers and abilities for one card or deck to encompass everything, it's tough to apply this to Magic: The Gathering. The closest to the spirit of the trope is probably Progenitus, which at 10/10 is among the largest naturally-occuring creatures and has Protection from Everything. (Protection effects are usually limited to a single color or creature type.) Fittingly, it costs two of every mana type to play, requiring the player to be something of a Master of All just to get it on the field.

Turn-Based Strategy
  • Tactics Ogre: Before the remake said class was the AI-only Templar Knight.

Western RPG
  • The player in the Fable games is almost certain to be this. While you CAN choose to specialize, the way the cost of upgrades scales means there's no reason to: the cost of going outside your specialty quickly becomes negligible meaning that there's no down side to ultimately becoming equally proficient in Strength, Skill, and Will.
  • It's possible to turn the player character into this in most Bethesda games, such as Fallout3 and The Elder Scrolls, but it takes an insane amount of Level Grinding.


Non-Game Examples:

Anime & Manga
  • Every fighter in Dragon Ball Z either is this or aspires to this. The one attempt to specialize (by Trunks, during the Cell Saga) results in Crippling Overspecialization. Other than that, speed, strength, invulnerability, and ki control all seem to increase proportionally with power level. Some less-powerful characters are said to be greater strategists, but this is inconsistent and tends to be a bit of an Informed Ability in any case.

Comic Books

Film

Literature
  • The titular character in The Tales of Alvin Maker is this. He can duplicate the specialized "knack" abilities of almost every other character of European descent in the series, and the generalist greensong powers of the Native Americans as well. A character Lampshades this when a phrenological examination of his head reveals that all of his traits and talents are perfectly balanced.
  • Rand in The Wheel of Time definitely counts, combining world-class swordsmanship, ta'veren status, dreamwalking, and THE most powerful magical ability in the world.

Western Animation

Real Life


Community Feedback Replies: 44
  • July 31, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    Has also a good chance of overlapping with All Your Powers Combined.
  • July 31, 2013
    acrobox
    how is this significantly different from Lightning Bruiser
  • July 31, 2013
    hbi2k
    A Lightning Bruiser is 1.) fast, 2.) strong offensively, and, 3.) strong defensively. This trope is those three things, PLUS any other relevant specializations (such as intelligence, wisdom, charisma, or magic). There's a lot of overlap, but they're not necessarily the same.

    For example, a Lightning Bruiser who specializes in melee and sucks at range (or the reverse) would not be this. In games with Elemental Rock Paper Scissors, a Lightning Bruiser who specializes in a single element would not be this. In games with a distinction between physical and magic damage, a Lightning Bruiser that specialized in dealing one or the other would not be this. A Lightning Bruiser can be dumb: a Master Of All cannot.
  • July 31, 2013
    hbi2k
    Also, in a game where speed is not an issue, you might have a Master Of All that is not a Lightning Bruiser. For example, if you added a Middle Finger move to Rock Paper Scissors that beat all three, it would be a Master Of All but not a Lightning Bruiser because it moves exactly as fast as its competition (one move per round). (There's probably a better example for that but I can't think of one right now.)
  • July 31, 2013
    DracMonster
    Heh. y'know, if you remove the video game context, this describes a God Mode Sue. (You might say this is when that is codified into a work.) You'll probably need to word the description carefully to avoid Trope Decay.
  • July 31, 2013
    Lightblade
    If the game pits you against one of these, you have yourself a Perfect Stats Boss (currently in development)
  • July 31, 2013
    hbi2k
    Good feedback, everyone.
  • July 31, 2013
    Larkmarn
    ^^^ It also describes a video-game version of The Ace. I think it's appropriately distinct and worth subtroping.
  • July 31, 2013
    Lightblade
    Adding to my earlier comment, how would you say this differs from a Perfect Stats Boss?
  • July 31, 2013
    hbi2k
    I'd call it a Super Trope to Perfect Stats Boss, since it's not strictly limited to video games and can include player characters and NP Cs as well as bosses.
  • July 31, 2013
    TrueShadow1
    • The Majin class from the first Disgaea game. Very high stats all across the board, positive Aptitudes for all stats, very proficient with all weapons, and high mobility. There is no reason to use anything else when you have unlocked this class (though it requires a bit of a Guide Dang It). The subsequent games nerf this class severely, though. The second game reduces its mobility to the minimum, making it somewhat of a Mighty Glacier instead. The third and fourth games take it even further, giving it low aptitude above the low mobility, and no weapon proficiency, making the class require a lot of work to even be remotely playable.
  • August 1, 2013
    DAN004
    Compare The Omnipotent.
  • August 1, 2013
    AP
    • Batman's whole schtick is that he is skilled in everything a human could possibly be skilled in. He's one of the best detectives, is skilled in every scientific field, is a Master Of Disguise, a capable leader, the top martial artist of his universe, an expert marksman, has a ton of hightech gadgets thanks to being one of the welathiest men in the world, has trained his body to Charles Atlas Superpower level, and often displays random skills such as being a capable actor just in case he might have need of that skill. One could point out that he has o superpowers but since he is a Badass Normal with plans to take down every superhuman on the planet, that isn't much of a drawback, either.
  • August 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    I understand that you feel this trope is significantly different from the other tropes you've listed. However, I have one question; will any of these tropes, Badass, The Ace, Lightning Bruiser, Game Breaker, and The Omnipotent, duplicate your example list?
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    Duplicate exactly? No. Significantly overlap with? Yes. But then, those tropes all significantly overlap with one another. That's the nature of closely related yet distinct tropes.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    That is a good point, though, and as a thought experiment and a way to further define this trope it may be useful for me to go ahead and list examples of those five tropes that do NOT count as Master Of All (or vice versa). I will do so in my next few posts. Anyone who cares to chime in with further examples, please feel free.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    Examples of Master Of All which are not The Omnipotent:

    All of the examples above. All very powerful in their settings, some more powerful than any other character, but none approaching all-powerful. Most could still be overpowered by a group of specialists and none are godlike Reality Warpers.

    Examples of The Omnipotent which are not Master Of All:

    • Q from Star Trek. Clearly The Omnipotent, nearly The Omniscient, but very uncomfortable and unskilled when his powers are taken away and he's stuck in a human body. There's a difference between knowing the physics of how a warp drive works and having the skill to pilot a ship instead of just snapping your fingers and putting it where you want it to be. Arguably he could use his powers (while he still had them) to MAKE himself a Master Of All at will, but he never actually does it.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    Examples of Master Of All which are not Badass:

    Can't really think of any, so there's an argument to be made for filing this as a subtrope of Badass.

    Examples of Badass which are not Master Of All:

    • Leonidas in 300. He's an expert in the Greek style of fighting with spear and shield and a master tactician, but put him on top of one of the Persian war elephants and he wouldn't know what to do. (Other than stab it in the eye, hop down, and continue kicking ass on foot, probably.)
    • Buffy Summers from Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Total badass, nowhere near as skilled in witchcraft as the dedicated witches among the Scoobies.
    • Too many other examples to name.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    As an aside at this point, I'm becoming increasingly uncomfortable with Batman among the Comic Book examples. It's accurate from A Certain Point Of View, but there are just too many things other characters can do that he can't (superpowers being the most obvious example) for it to be a really good fit. I think having him there just muddies the waters.

    An argument could be made for him in settings that don't include superpowers, such as the Tim Burton and Begins Batmen.

    Would welcome further thoughts and input.

  • August 1, 2013
    nielas
    • In Call Of Juarez Gunslinger, by the end of New Game Plus the player should be able to max out all three skills trees and become a master of all three combat disciplines. This creates some weird synergies that allow you to do things like performing six or more consecutive Boom Headshot on distant enemies in the span of a few seconds while using a sawed-off shotgun that only has two shells in it. It really helps to emphasize the Unreliable Narrator nature of the story.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    Examples of Master Of All which are not The Ace:

    • Minion, if only by virtue of not receiving enough Character Development to count. Probably other video game and/or villainous examples.

    Examples of The Ace that are not Master Of All:

    • Cowboy Andy of Cowboy Bebop. There's no evidence that he's as good at dogfighting as any of the main characters, or as good a hacker as Ed.
    • Jet from Avatar The Last Airbender. Can't bend.
    • Brock from Venture Brothers. Not as good at science as many other characters.
    • Kousaka from Genshiken. Not as good an artist as Kugayama or Oguie. Not as good at designing / sewing cosplay as Tanaka. Not a generalist: specializes in video games and being bishonen.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    Examples of Master Of All that are not Lightning Bruisers:

    • The strict definition of a Renaissance Man. Proficiency in all areas of science and philosophy doesn't make you run faster, hit harder, or take more punishment.

    Examples of Lightning Bruiser who are not Master Of All:

    • Any number of Marvel comics characters who aren't as good at science as Reed Richards, most notably the (green) Hulk, who tends to be dumb as a brick.
    • Any Lightning Bruiser that is a melee specialist in a setting that includes guns / archery / other ranged combat.
    • Spike in Cowboy Bebop, who can't hack as well as Ed.
  • August 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Now I get what your idea is. But I'm not sure it is a trope....

    In a series set in a hospital, the Master of all has to be able to be a surgeon, diagnostician, lab tech, pharmacist, nurse, chemotherapist, and a good bedside manner.

    In a series set in a software company, the Master of all has to be able to build servers, lead projects, write code in every computer language, have access to all of the files, hack, block hackers, and turn viruses against themselves.

    The talents required to be a Master of all in one series does not translate into being a master of all in another series. Except for Game Breaker, Lightning Bruiser, and (sometimes) Bad Ass, the character doesn't lose their trope by being in a different universe. The Ace Pilot is still an Ace, even if he comes from 1943, and is in 1998.

    Only when you remove the tropes, such as (using kryptonite on Superman to remove the Flying Brick trope) or (taking away Q's powers to make him no longer count as The Omnipotent) are tropes like that affected. In Superman Red Son, Supes is a Master Of All, but in the DCAU, which changes nothing about his powers or personality, he no longer counts.

    So I understand what your rules are, but I think it isn't about the character. I think your rules define the situation, or universe, instead.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    Examples of Master Of All that are not Game Breakers:

    • A generalist player character in Fable. Sure, he's roughly as good in Strength, Skill, and Will at any given level as a specialist would be, but this doesn't break the game, because the game is balanced with that play style in mind.
    • The player character can become this in Skyrim, but it's not a Game Breaker because it requires absurd amounts of Level Grinding.
    • Ditto most any game with a Job System, such as Dragon Quest IX and Final Fantasy Tactics.

    Examples of Game Breaker that are not Master Of All:

    • Wind God Gau, Ultima + Economizer, Vanish + X-Zone, Offering + Genji Glove, and any number of other Final Fantasy exploits are Gamebreakers precisely BECAUSE they rely on specializing in overpowered combinations of magic and/or equipment instead of generalizing.
    • Ditto the Morrowind Singularity or abusing Enchanting and Alchemy in Skyrim, which are Game Breakers due to specializing in a broken skill or skills.

  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    I'm not sure I understand the objection (or if it is one). There are plenty of character tropes that are setting-dependent, such as Lightning Bruiser, which specifies that a character must be fast and strong by the standards of the setting to count. So Mohammed Ali may be a Lightning Bruiser by the standards of Real Life boxers, but drop him into the Justice League and he's a slow, squishy scrub.
  • August 1, 2013
    Paradisesnake
    EDIT: Damn, hbi2k was faster than me. But yeah, like tropes like Lightning Bruiser, this too always exists only in relation to other characters. There's nothing problematic about it.
  • August 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Because "setting" refers to things like "countryside" or "metropolis", not In-Universe, which your definition does not cover, and according to your definition, one instance of being surpassed, in any skill, disqualifies the character.

    I'm less complaining, and more attempting a dialogue. Ykttw is usually pretty good for that.

    When I first read this trope, I knew that it was supposed to complete the trinity of "bad at all skills", "decent at all skills", by being "the best at all skills". My problem is that trope has defaulted to The Ace for me. But instead of complaining, I asked questions, to understand what you wanted.

    Now I think you need to clarify the In Universe limitation of the trope. My additional suggestion is to change from "the best, absolutely" to "the best, generally". This troper can function as super trope to Lightning Bruiser (who is better than MOST, not all) Here's a proposed paragraph:

    Master Of None, Jack Of All Trades, and Master Of All are related tropes. Each describes a generalist character type, bad/good/great at everything. While the Jack might be good enough at any skill, the Master of All is rarely outclassed, usually only by someone with a Crippling Overspecialization.

    This allows the Martian Manhunter to be a Master of All, despite The Flash being canonically faster. For Batman specifically, you can agree that within his own work, he is a Master of All, but in the larger DCU, he is outclassed by many super powered individuals in brains, brawn, techniques, and speed.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    I hope I haven't made you feel like your input is unwelcome. I think that your feedback is excellent and will help make the final trope clearer. As Dracmonster said, we want to make the wording as clear and easy-to-understand as possible to avoid Trope Decay.

    I was operating on the unspoken assumption that the Master Of All doesn't need to be "the best, absolutely" in every skill / trait / stat, just within the top tier. It seems that isn't stated clearly enough in the trope description if you read it differently, though.

    My understanding of The Ace is that it has less to do with the character's actual level of skill / talent / ability and more to do with the way he functions in the story, i.e. as an ideal for The Hero to strive for (or The Rival to strive against). Or is that more The Paragon? To be honest I've always gotten those a little confused since there's so much overlap.

    Also, AFAIK it's not important that The Ace be a generalist. So a hotshot criminal prosecutor in a legal drama could be The Ace even though the Smart Guy in the corner could school him at tax law and the general practice Jack Of All Trades across town knows more than either about copyright, and all three specializations could be equally relevant in a given episode.

    In any case, please continue to contribute to the discussion, it's really helping.
  • August 1, 2013
    hbi2k
    I don't think it quite fits as a Super Trope to Lightning Bruiser, just because it's so easy to be a Lightning Bruiser without being Master Of All. Being a Lightning Bruiser only makes you Master Of All in settings where speed, strength, and invulnerability are the ONLY three traits that matter.
  • August 1, 2013
    Chabal2
    Dragon Quest VI has a particularly spectacular example in that changing class affects only your stats, while spells are determined by the class's rank, itself depending on the number of battles you've fought. However, spells stay with the character once learned even after subsequent class changes, which can lead to situations like the Mighty Glacier throwing healing spells or the Squishy Wizard launching physical attacks, and doing quite well at both.
  • August 1, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    Long post incoming <(O.~)>
  • August 2, 2013
    DAN004
    Lovin' all the talk. Hatted.
  • August 2, 2013
    hbi2k
    Should we put the Video Game examples first and section off Non-Game Examples at the end to put it more in line with Master Of None and Jack Of All Stats?

    Thoughts?
  • August 2, 2013
    DAN004
    Since those two tropes also listed video game examples first then so should this one.
  • August 2, 2013
    DracMonster
    I suggested this in the Perfect Stats Boss YKTTW, OP thought she might fit better here, although I think she qualifies for both, since other characters fear her as an invincible nemesis.

  • August 2, 2013
    acrobox
    • in the Pokemon games, the Mew-clones are this with 100 as a base stat across the board and typically able to learn an incredibly wide variety of moves. Mew in particular can learn every teachable move.
      • Arceus takes this even further have 120 base stats across the board, capable of learning every teachable move (except moves that explicitly require hands due to being a Marvelous Deer) and has an ability that allows it to change into any of the 17 Elemental Rock Paper Scissors Types.
  • August 2, 2013
    crazysamaritan
    @ hbi2k

    Thank you for the compliment.

    The unspoken assumption made me read a requirement. You've definitely improved the definition in that area. I think there's still problems, but the more of the related tropes I read, the more I think it may be a need to improve these tropes, in general, not yours in specific. More on this later.

    The Paragon is an inspiration to people. As you say, they do not have to be the best, their job is done if others are inspired to be their own hero. The Ace is Always Someone Better personified. By definition, if they are a hotshot criminal prosecutor in a legal drama, then when the Protagonist asks the Smart Guy to school him at tax law and the general practice Jack Of All Trades across town to quiz him on copyright, The Ace calmly shows that's able to out-do both. If he wasn't tired from the case this morning, he could've beaten them at the same time. Because they are Always Someone Better personified, writers are rarely able to make them more than recurring characters (without becoming the Broken Ace). See: "In a work revolving around a specific activity, any kind of Serious Business, the Ace will be the best at it. In works lacking that sort of focus, they'll probably be extremely talented at everything."

    We apparently have two sets of generalist trios. Master Of None / Jack Of All Trades / Renaissance Man is the trio for 'skills', non-game elements where someone is terrible/good/excells at everything. But we also have Joke Character / Jack Of All Stats / Lightning Bruiser, which are intended to be gameplay tropes, regarding the statistics of a given character; if they are terrible/good/great in every statistic.

    However, we seem to have three problems with this division.
    1. Lightning Bruiser ideally combines the strengths of the Stone Wall, Fragile Speedster, and Glass Cannon. Explicitly leaving out any additional skills/statistics that should apply to a generalist character.
    2. The six tropes reference between 0-3 of the other tropes. No overall supertrope that covers what it means to be a generalist character vs good at three skills. (this trope vs a LB)
    3. Trades is the most balanced portrayal, but his job is to be the supertrope of Master Of None and Renaissance Man, when MON is used as the bad version of the Jack Of All Stats, "who has well-balanced stats, not skills."

    I think a bit of organizing needs to be done here, and one of the first questions you (as trope-author for Master Of All) should answer is if your goal is to cover a gameplay trope (character statistics are higher than most of the cast) or a characterization trope (person in a story who is skilled at nearly everything). Additional questions probably need to be asked in TRS or Ask The Tropers.
  • August 2, 2013
    MrRuano
    The Soul Series has Edge Master, a proclaimed master of the art of fighting, who has supposedly mastered every fighting style known to man to the point that he can teach others and utilize them himself if need be. It's also noted that he has clashed with the Warrior King Algol and perhaps was the one person who fought Olcadan to a draw. Especially enforced in Soul Calibur V, where he was the only character to mimic every style, while fellow Ditto Fighters Killik and Elysium could only copy male and female fighting styles respectively.
  • August 3, 2013
    Chabal2
    The Golden Kart in Mario Kart Double Dash has the best combined stats of all vehicles. Some are better in one stat but lower in the others (Bowser's has highest top speed, but takes a while to get there).
  • August 3, 2013
    IAmATropist
    Super Sonic in Sonic R has perfect stats across the board.
  • August 3, 2013
    Mauri
    Well here is a lil detail hoping I don't get it wrong:

    • Doctor Who: Both the Doctor and the Master fall into this. The Doctor borders the insufferable genius and dances with it but has had time (partly due to the Really 700 years old trope). It is mentioned in an episode (The God Complex) that the Doctor has a doctorate in Medicine and Cheese making (not sure of others in the list).

      • Tactics Ogre: Before the remake said class was the AI only Templar Knights.
  • August 3, 2013
    DAN004
    • In the PAL version of Crash Team Racing, the cheat-only character Penta Penguin has perfect scores in all stats. When it comes to the race itself, though, he's often tiered lower than the high-speed-low-handling characters, due to how power-sliding works.
  • August 3, 2013
    Larkmarn
    • The RCP-90 in Goldeneye 1997 was incredibly powerful (its power was only matched by cheat weapons and explosives), had one of (if not the) highest firing rate in the game, and had the largest ammo capacity to boot. To top it off, it used the single most common ammo in the game.
  • August 4, 2013
    hbi2k
    @Crazy Samaritan:

    From the trope description of The Ace:

    "In a work revolving around a specific activity, any kind of Serious Business, the Ace will be the best at it. In works lacking that sort of focus, they'll probably be extremely talented at everything."

    I read that to mean that while he CAN be a Master Of All, it's not necessary for him to count as The Ace. It's only necessary for him to be better than The Protagonist (or whoever is the basis for comparison at the time), and only at whatever is the main focus of the plot arc. Hence the examples above of a character that clearly functions in-story as The Ace while not being Master Of All.

    I'm not sure that Joke Character fits in the trifecta of lame / good / great at everything, because the Joke Character is never intended to be good at anything. He's intentionally lame. The Master Of None is a character that was intended to be a Jack Of All Stats, but the game balance went screwy somewhere and he wound up falling victim to Cant Catch Up compared to specialists.

    In any case, I think that the way Master Of All is evolving (as a complement to Master Of None / Jack Of All Stats), we should consider it as a gameplay trope first, and a character trope only secondarily.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=42kmdu55re99q7z7uqgwtg62&trope=MasterOfAll