Created By: Bisected8 on October 27, 2013 Last Edited By: Bisected8 on November 27, 2013
Troped

Cooperation Gambit

Just because you have to destroy your enemy later now doesn't mean you can't cut a fair deal now

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Needs a Better Name, Needs Examples

See name crowner here! Feel free to add a new suggestion to the list.

Quotes(?):
"No, that's not ironic. Ironic would be if we had to work together to hurt each other."
Simmons, Red vs. Blue

Indexes;
Homer: All right, brain; you don't like me and I don't like you. But lets just do this and I can get back to killing you with beer.
Homer's Brain: It's a deal!

This trope is about making a deal with or helping the enemy or the opposition in order to further one's own goals. Often, the thought behind this is to give up a short-term advantage or benefit for a more longer-term or lasting one. The cooperation need not be mutual or completely honest, as long as the terms of the deal are honoured and no coercion is involved. Some hypothetical examples include:

  • Providing information to the opposition where they can find an important artefact, hoping that this can keep them distracted enough that you can find a more important or useful item.
  • Treating your prisoners well, and agreeing on prisoner exchanges, in the hope of your enemies treating their prisoners well as well, and that the enemy forces will surrender instead of fighting to the death.
  • Trading one important item for another. Both sides get what they want (or maybe deprive the other side of what they traded for) without the need for a battle (e.g. the heroes want that silly looking stone and the villains are willing to trade it for that rusty old sword).
  • Making a temporary truce on the understanding it'll be business as usual afterwards. Working together for a goal they know only one of them can obtain in the end (with the benefits of cooperating outweighing the risks of the other side snatching it first) is a common cause.

This sort of thing is never a Heel–Face Turn/Face–Heel Turn (although it can be part of a Hazy Feel Turn, especially if a Wild Card's involved) - the character or faction in question is still working towards their original goals. A low level hero or minion might still work against the boss's wishes (e.g. they let a prisoner go because they think they're more effort to keep imprisoned than they could get from holding them hostage...or maybe to keep their leader from Jumping Off the Slippery Slope), however. At its most extreme, a character might join up as The Sixth Ranger (either as a representative of their side or working on their own initiative).

Super Trope to Enemy Mine (where the "deal" in question is joining forces for the specific purpose of overcoming some sort of threat to both sides), examples of which belong on that page.

The Enigmatic Minion is especially prone to these with the heroes, while a hero attempting this might make themselves a Poisonous Friend (and someone of any morality might suffer a Neutrality Backlash). If both sides join forces, it might lead to Teeth-Clenched Teamwork. Compare Punchclock Villain/Punchclock Hero, Go-Karting with Bowser, Deal with the Devil, Villain Teamup and Pragmatic Villainy. Contrast Hostage for MacGuffin and "Blackmail" is Such an Ugly Word (for unfair deals).

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Anime and Manga 
  • In the Pokémon anime, Team Rocket have helped Ash and Co a couple of times to further their own plans. For example;
    • In "Pokémon Scent-sation!" they helped him sneak into an all-girls gym he'd been banned from by dressing him up as "Ashley" and posing as "her" parents. This allows them to plant a smoke bomb so they could break in later (although they let him assume they were doing him a favour for helping them when they were stuck in a tree).
    • On more than one occasion (the first being "Electric Shock Showdown") they cheered him on with the excuse that it'll mean Ash's pokemon will be stronger "when" they steal them (particularly in the Pokemon league episodes).
  • In One Piece, Trafalgar Law, (who previously considered himself a rival to the other Supernovas. The Straw Hats in particular), forms an alliance with the Straw Hats to defeat Kaido (one of the Four Emperors) by cutting the weapons supply from his client, Doflamingo. Turns out Law was really after Doflamingo himself. Kaido is merely his backup plan and he used the Straw Hats to destroy Doflamingo's weapons factory so that Kaido will punish him for it.

     Film 
  • The Great Race. After Professor Fate and Maggie DuBois are kidnapped by some bad guys, Fate's minion Max joins forces with the Great Leslie to rescue them. Of course, being a villain Max betrays the heroes during the rescue.
  • The entire plot of Exam. All eight candidates are vying for the same job, but they agree to work together fully knowing only one can advance. Some are more genuine in their cooperation than others.
  • The premise of the Wuxia movie Warriors of Heaven and Earth is based around this sort of deal between a military officer named Lt. Lai Qi and his predecessor, Lt. Li (who deserted). It turns out that Li has sworn to escort a group of monks (and refuses to come quietly if he's not allowed to do so), so Lai Qui agrees to help him escort them on the understanding they'll resume their battle afterwards.
  • In Ocean's Thirteen, the group gets financial sponsorship from the villain of the first two movies in exchange for the profits. The main characters are happy with this deal, since it's not about the money this time.

     Literature 
  • One of the main strategies adopted by Mike Stearns in the 1632 books. The time-displaced Americans, for example, teach everyone they meet (friends, opponents, or enemies) how to make the antibiotic chloramphenicol. They know that any major production will require them to educate their workforce, and thus let in more radical ideas. Stearns also directly advises his political rival Wilhelm Wettin in how to build an effective political party that could rival his own.
  • In Jules Verne's Around The Worldin Eighty Days, the valet and the police inspector come to an agreement to help each other as long as Fogg is out of British territory - the inspector wants to arrest Fogg for a bank robbery, the valet is trying to help his boss finish his world trip.
    "Friends, no, allies, yes, but at the slightest sign of treachery I'll wring your neck."
  • In the Ciaphas Cain novel "For the Emperor", Cain's unit is stationed on a planet that's on the verge of civil war thanks to the Tau attempting to annex it. Neither side wants it to break out (yet), leading to a lot of this. Early on, a Kroot mercenary saves Cain from being beaten to death by Tau sympathisers. Much later, Cain helps a Tau ambassador get medical treatment and escorts him back to his compound (even having to order the guardsmen under his command to shoot some loyalists who wanted to lynch the Tau).

     Web Comics 

     Western Animation 
  • In the Futurama episode "Mother's Day", Mom has set off a Robot War (with a remote control that forces all the robots in the world to rebel) because it's the anniversary of the day she was spurned by Prof. Farnsworth. Her sons try to end the uprising and make her happy by tracking down Farnsworth and getting him to get back together with her.
  • Averted by Buzz Lightyear of Star Command; one episode has Zerg deposed by another villain and he spends it watching Buzz et al trying to fight the new threat without offering any help (apparently on principle).

Community Feedback Replies: 72
  • October 29, 2013
    Arivne
    Film
    • The Great Race. After Professor Fate and Maggie DuBois are kidnapped by some bad guys, Fate's minion Max joins forces with the Great Leslie to rescue them. Of course, being a villain Max betrays the heroes during the rescue.
  • November 1, 2013
    Bisected8
    Well, this doesn't seem to be getting much attention.

    Is it a problem with the OP or is it just a boring trope (I'd assume if it wasn't tropable, someone would have brought it up by now...)?
  • November 2, 2013
    kjnoren
    I think part of the trouble is that it's both a character trope (minion) and an event trope (cooperating with the opposition/the enemies/the other side in order to distract them).

    I think the core of the trope should be a lot simpler, like "cooperating with the other side in order to gain an advantage for the own side".
  • November 2, 2013
    Noaqiyeum
    I agree with kjnoren.
  • November 2, 2013
    Bisected8
    Good point, I'll try and rewrite the OP a bit...

    EDIT: How's that?
  • November 2, 2013
    TBTabby
    This is Enemy Mine.
  • November 2, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ That is already mentioned as a subtrope.
  • November 2, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    There's another Pokemon example, in which they're trapped inside a capsized cruise ship below the ocean's surface, and have to work together to escape. We even have this exchange:
    Jessie: This is just a temporary truce until we get out of this.
    Ash: Better believe it.
  • November 3, 2013
    Bisected8
    That might fit better under Enemy Mine (since the sinking ship's a threat to both of them and escaping from it is what both sides want out of the deal).
  • November 3, 2013
    kjnoren
    I don't think Enemy Mine should be viewed as the supertrope here, since it introduces a third party or an outside factor. I also don't think it's a subtrope either, since it lacks the "uses cooperation to stealthily get ahead" factor.

    I also can't say I like Cooperative Enemy as the trope name either, since that can imply an enemy that cooperates with your plans without any cooperation. The French army during the Battle of France in World War Two might be viewed as such an example.

    What about Cooperation Gambit? (For all that I dislike the meaning of Gambit here on TV Tropes, it's what is used here.)
  • November 3, 2013
    Bisected8
    OK, let's just call it a Sister Trope for now...

    I'll start a list of names.
  • November 4, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    Dealing With The Enemy

    i'm pretty sure "i'll deal with him" and other variations of it is a stock phrase used by heroes and villains alike to mean "i'll kill/defeat the guy".

    this name is just asking for misunderstanding IMO.

    how bout Temporary Alliance / One Time Deal?...

    damn, doesn't say a thing about the "further one party's goal" part...
  • November 5, 2013
    Bisected8
    What "further one party's goal" part? The whole point of the trope is that its meant to be a deal acceptable to both parties (whether one got more than the other out of it would be incidental)...
  • November 5, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    huh? it's in the description itself.

    This trope covers characters who make deals with an enemy to further the goals of their own side.

    besides, without that distinction this would simply be Enemy Mine.
  • November 5, 2013
    Bisected8
    Yes, both sides are furthering their own side's goals. That sentence just emphasises that neither party has defected to the other's side. You cannot, by definition, have a deal that doesn't further your goals (that's the entire point of a deal).

    The title doesn't need to say it because it's rather obvious.... ^^;

    @kjnoren: After giving it some thought, I think that Enemy Mine is a subtrope of this (while both this trope and enemy can have a third party involved or one party using the deal to sneak ahead, neither has to have it - ergo all examples of Enemy Mine can safely fall under this trope).
  • November 5, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    ah, i think i get it now.

    this is about making a compromise with your enemy while Enemy Mine is about working together against something.

    is that it?
  • November 5, 2013
    Bisected8
    Precisely.
  • November 5, 2013
    kjnoren
    I don't like Dealing With The Enemy. I read it as relating to collaborators, or it can be interpreted as dealing properly with the enemy (in which case we get things like "the only good indian is a dead indian").
  • November 5, 2013
    Bisected8
    Do you have any other suggestions (or support any of the already-suggested titles)?

    In the interests of full disclosure; I intended that alternative meaning as a pun (since dealing with an enemy in the sense of fighting them would just be chairs, so there's no trope to confuse it with...).
  • November 5, 2013
    kjnoren
    I like my earlier proposal of Cooperation Gambit. It gets across that there's a plan of some complexity behind the cooperation, and it explicityly opens the trope to not only overt enemies but also opponents. (The Sixteen Thirty Two books discusses and lampshades this lots of times, as Mike Stearns et al freely teaches their opponents and enemies how to make medicines and advises them how to build effective political parties.)

    It's one thing when you have a pun that supports the concept of the trope, but here the additional meanings give entirely different meanings, in one case collaboration, in the other as an euphemism for violence or even executions.
  • November 5, 2013
    Bisected8
    Well, it makes for an unambiguous placeholder, at least....
  • November 5, 2013
    kjnoren
    Literature:

    • One of the main strategies adopted by Mike Stearns in the Sixteen Thirty Two books. The time-displaced Americans eg teach everyone they meet (friends, opponents, or enemies) how to make the antibiotic chloramphenicol, knowing that any major production will require them to educate their workforce, and thus let in more radical ideas. Stearns also directly advises his political rival Wilhelm Wettin in how to build an effective political party that could rival his own.
  • November 5, 2013
    robbulldog
    Literature:
    • In Jules Verne's Around The Worldin Eighty Days, the valet and the police inspector come to an agreement to help each other as long as Fogg is out of British territory - the inspector wants to arrest Fogg for a bank robbery, the valet is trying to help his boss finish his world trip. "Friends, no, allies, yes, but at the slightest sign of treachery I'll wring your neck."
  • November 5, 2013
    j21
  • November 5, 2013
    Bisected8
    Could you elaborate?
  • November 5, 2013
    DAN004
    Does this count?
    • One Piece
      • In the Marineford war, Akainu secretly makes a deal with Squard, one of Whitebeard's allies, to backstab Whitebeard. Akainu manipulated Squard into thinking that Whitebeard is going to sell his allies out just to save Ace, whose father thrashed Squard's old crew. While Squard managed to do it, it only did a little harm to Whitebeard, and he told Squard to cast aside Ace's father's sins from Ace himself, and calling his "foolish son" that he still loves him.
      • Later on, Trafalgar Law, previously proclaiming himself a rival to the other Supernovas (and the Straw Hats in particular), forms an alliance with the Straw Hats to supposedly defeat Kaido (one of the Four Emperors) by cutting the weapons supply from his client, Doflamingo. Turns out Law was really after Doflamingo himself because Law has a beef against him since about 12 years ago; Kaido is merely his backup plan and he used the Straw Hats to destroy Doflamingo's weapons factory so that Kaido will lash at him for the loss of supply.
  • November 6, 2013
    Bisected8
    The first one doesn't seem to fit, unless I've misunderstood (Squard is simply being convinced to betray his own side). The second one sounds like an example, though.
  • November 8, 2013
    troacctid
    Is Hostage For Mac Guffin another subtrope, or is it too extortion-y?
  • November 8, 2013
    Bisected8
    Yeah, that's more along the lines of the hostage takers extorting an unfair deal. Might be worth mentioning though.
  • November 9, 2013
    eowynjedi
    Live Action TV:

    • The two-parter "Scorpion" in Star Trek Voyager has Janeway strike an alliance with the Borg to deal with species 8472, which could annihilate them both and possibly many others in the Delta Quadrant. Being Genre Savvy about the Borg, they also prepare for their sudden and inevitable betrayal (and get a new cast member in the process).
  • November 9, 2013
    Bisected8
    That fits better under Enemy Mine.
  • November 10, 2013
    Dcoetzee
    I'd go for the title Temporary Alliance, but I'm seriously thinking that expanding the scope of Enemy Mine to encompass a few additional examples might be a better option than a brand new Super Trope.
  • November 10, 2013
    Bisected8
    Enemy Mine is about two enemies teaming up to fight a threat to them both.

    If you expanded it to cover all the examples here, it would be completely different (since this also covers stuff like trades and agreements to avoid interfering with their business). Not to mention the name wouldn't make sense (since it comes from an old proverb about fighting a common foe).
  • November 11, 2013
    DAN004
    I think Cooperation Gambit is more of a covert deal and only happening between someone relatively low-key while Enemy Mine is more major.
  • November 11, 2013
    kjnoren
    No, the scope of this is irrelevant. Cooperation Gambit is cooperating with an opponent in order to gain a small advantage for yourself. Enemy Mine is about cooperating with an opponent in order to defeat a mutual enemy.

    One example of Enemy Mine is in the Swedish novel Fiendens fiende (The Enemy's Enemy). In it, a rogue group within the Swedish security police sets out to escalate tensions between Sweden and the Soviet Union in order to force political changes in Sweden. They do so by staging terror attacks within Sweden, aimed against both Swedish and Soviet targets, and making it appear as an open war between spies within the media.

    Needless to say, neither Swedish nor Soviet authorities are happy with this, and cooperate in order to catch the group (basically, Soviet intelligence eavesdrop on the media, strictly forbidden for Swedish authorities to do, and they they feed that information to the Swedish authorities who gets to arrest the group during their next attack).

    This is clearly Enemy Mine, but is hardly an example of a Cooperation Gambit.
  • November 13, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    they're not enemies, but i'm curious if it counts as Cooperation Gambit.

    Film - Animation
    • In Wreck It Ralph, Vanellope makes a deal with Ralph that she will give him back his medal which she used to sign up for a race if he helps her get a kart to join it and win.

    it's a deal where Party A wants Goal B and Party B wants Goal A, there is no common goal in the deal. does this count or it's a different dealing trope?
  • November 13, 2013
    DAN004
    Maybe a title crowner?
  • November 13, 2013
    DAN004
    Compare Villain Team Up.
  • November 14, 2013
    Bisected8
    ^^^ I don't think it would (since people with different goals teaming up would probably be another trope - this is specifically about enemies making mutually beneficial deals).

    ^ That might be a good idea, unless anyone wants to support any of the existing names?

    EDIT: Vote here!
  • November 15, 2013
    Statalyzer
    Please don't call this a gambit. A gambit is a risk that involves sacrificing material to gain position. Cooperation With Enemy is more accurate and to the point. Cooperation Gamble would work as well.
  • November 15, 2013
    Statalyzer
    "That sentence just emphasises that neither party has defected to the other's side. You cannot, by definition, have a deal that doesn't further your goals (that's the entire point of a deal)."

    But it also should be clear that this isn't a deal made under force from the enemy where it furthers your goals to collaborate b/c you don't want to be kill (ie Lando in Empire Strikes Back is not using this trope, if I understand it right).
  • November 15, 2013
    kjnoren
    ^^ Gambit here on TV Tropes simply means any complex plan. It bugs me as well, but we're pretty much stuck with it.

    Cooperation With The Enemy has to me the same trouble as Dealing With The Enemy - it can easily be read as collaboration, to cooperate with the enemy for your own personal gain (as opposed to the gain of your own side as a whole).
  • November 15, 2013
    Bisected8
    ^^^ 1. You are sacrificing something though; you're helping or making concessions to your enemy to get what you want.

    2. I looked it up; that definition only applies to a type of strategy in a game of Chess. According to the copy of the Oxford English Dictionary on my kindle (I can't link to it, since the online OED's a subscription service, so you'll have to take my word on it unless you have your own copy), google's definition (just google "gambit definition") and Wiktionary the non-chess meaning doesn't need to involve a sacrifice.

    ^^ Good point. I'll add the clarification.
  • November 16, 2013
    Bisected8
    While the crowner's accumulating votes, does anyone have any thoughts on the page quote?

    Is the description clear?
  • November 16, 2013
    Jaqen
    TV Sword of Truth Season 2 was good guys allying with bad guys versus worse guys.

    This trope is different from Enemy Mine? Define it.
  • November 16, 2013
    kjnoren
    For quote, I think the current one is quite bland. It doesn't really say anything about the trope to me. Perhaps if I was familiar with the work, but then most readers won't be. Better to leave it empty than have a non-illustrative quote.

    As for the description, here's a stab at a revised opening paragraph. I've focused on trying to reduce unnecessary verbiage:
    Making a deal with or helping the enemy or the opposition in order to further one's own goals. Often, the thought behind this is to give up a short-term advantage or benefit for a more longer-term or lasting one. The cooperation need not be mutual or completely honest, as long as the terms of the deal are honoured and no coercion is involved. Two hypotetical examples:

    1. Providing information to the opposition where they can find an important artifact, hoping that this can keep them distracted enough that you can find a more important or useful item
    2. Treating your prisoners well, and agreeing on prisoner exchanges, in the hope of your enemies treating their prisoners well as well, and that the enemy forces will surrender instead of fighting to the death
  • November 16, 2013
    kjnoren
    ^^ Enemy Mine requires cooperation against a third party. This one doesn't.
  • November 16, 2013
    Bisected8
    @Jaqen: The difference is explained in the penultimate paragraph of the description;

    Super Trope to Enemy Mine (where the "deal" in question is joining forces for the specific purpose of overcoming some sort of threat to both sides), examples of which belong on that page.

    @kjnoren: Thanks, I'll stash the original draft of the first paragraph below for safekeeping and work that in.

    EDIT: That reads a lot more clearly (I added a few pot holes and another example, though).
    This trope covers characters who make deals with an enemy to further the goals of their own side. Maybe they think the heroes decide they should just let the villain have the Sword of Destiny in exchange for the Plot Coupon, or maybe the villains think that helping the heroes on this quest will keep them distracted for a while. Either way, both sides cooperate and get what they want from the deal (and generally assume they got the better part of the bargain, although this isn't necessary). Note that this cooperation doesn't have to be mutualExample  or completely honestExample , as long as the terms of the deal are honoured and no coercion's involvedExample .
  • November 16, 2013
    kjnoren
    Just a note, I think starting the description with "this trope is about" or similar is poor writing. It's unnecessary verbiage, and I think it serves to weaken the definition.
  • November 16, 2013
    Bisected8
    Well, I don't think it detracts from the overall article and just describing nothing in particular gives the same vibe as the old "begin the story with a disembodied line of dialogue" cliche that new writers are typically advised to avoid.

    That's just my opinion though. If you think it's important enough that it's worth changing, we can just go with that.
  • November 16, 2013
    DAN004
  • November 17, 2013
    Bisected8
    There's still only 10 votes on the crowner.

    Cooperation Gambit seems to have "won" by virtue of being the only entry with 3 votes (and no downvotes), which is enough for a title under the Three Rules Of Three, but I'd rather see more of a consensus.
  • November 17, 2013
    kjnoren
    No worries in letting the crowned run a bit more.
  • November 18, 2013
    kjnoren
    I've been looking for a quote in the Sixteen Thirty Two books, and found some awesome but quite long ones:

    Like this one, after the Cardinal-Infante has been given the recipe for chloramphenicol (a synthetic antibiotic) by his opponents):

    "That won't be good enough, I'm afraid." Don Fernando sighed. "I have no choice but to use it. But . . . why do I have the feeling I'm looking at a Trojan Horse here?"
    Rubens' eyes widened. "It's just medicine, Your Highness."
    The Spanish prince shook his head. "Horses come in many shapes."

    or this one, even longer:

    He still had the original papers the nurse had left behind. Acting, he was quite certain, on another's orders.
    How to Make Chloramphenicol
    The pages that followed that title gave precise instructions for how to manufacture the world's most potent medicine.
    The monster's stiletto, that the creature had driven into the heart of the world's greatest dynasty, his aim guided by a dragon's cunning and the force of the thrust by a titan's thews.
    Who else could have conceived such an assassin's stroke?
  • November 18, 2013
    Bisected8
    Hmm, they're a bit wordy (plus they feel less like "let's make a deal" and more "is this a trap?"). I don't think they really sum up the trope without already being aware of the example.

    We probably need something snappier. Something more along the lines of;
    "So, if we X, you'll Y? How do we know we can trust you?"
    "We want X as much as you want Y."

    Or;

    "I propose a deal [nature of deal]."
  • November 18, 2013
    kjnoren
    Yeah, neither work all that well as a page quote, even though they sum up the trope perfectly. Yes, it is a trap, but it's a trap that helps them immensely in the short term but which will help them onto a road that will screw with them long-term.

    But I think it's better to skip the page quote instead of having a bad one.
  • November 19, 2013
    kjnoren
    Some more digging, and this one might be of interest. It's also from 1633:

    Wilhelm glanced at his younger brother, smiled serenely, and then brought his intellectual's eyes back to Mike.
    "This crude and uncouth fellow across the table from me is trying to engineer the best opposition he can think of. Because, given such an opposition, he might someday be able to relinquish power. For a time, at least. Instead of having to fight a civil war. You might say he wants a Jefferson to his Washington. A Burke, as well as a Pitt."
  • November 19, 2013
    Bisected8
    It still doesn't sum up the trope. Not having read the work in question, I can barely tell what's going on, let alone what his plan is.
  • November 19, 2013
    kjnoren
    Yeah, this is a pretty complex trope :-)
  • November 19, 2013
    Bisected8
    Well...not really. I'm pretty sure there's a line of dialogue in something out there which basically boils down to "You're my enemy, but lets make a deal".

    EDIT: I just remembered this one from The Simpsons;

    Homer: All right, brain; you don't like me, and I don't like you. But lets just do this, and I can get back to killing you with beer.
    Homer's Brain: It's a deal!
  • November 20, 2013
    kjnoren
    The Simpsons one is decent.
  • November 21, 2013
    gtother
    It's possible from the current description that the entire plot of Exam follows this. All eight candidates are vying for the same job, but they agree to work together fully knowing only one can advance. Some are more genuine in their cooperation than others.
  • November 22, 2013
    jrh03
    Look up an a Chinese movie called "Warriors of Heaven and Earth". Its a very good flick and good story in its own right. Its sounds like a good example of what the poster means here.

    Lt Li is a former military officer who deserted the army (of course for an honorable reason).

    Lt Lai Qi is the current officer sent to find him and execute him.

    Qi confronts Li. Li states that he working as an armed guard and has sworn to a group of Buddhist monks that he will escort them and their sacred magical item to the capital. Thus he cannot turn himself in to Lai Qi right now.

    Li then offers that he will fight Lai Qi now, but if Lai Qi cannot kill him in three passes, Lai Qi must agree to let Li go free to accomplish his mission. Lai Qi agrees. Failing to defeat Li in the three passes, Lai Qi honors his word. However, still being obligated to do his duty to punish Li, Lai Qi decides he will ride to the capital with Li, helping him to deliver the monks under the condition that once the mission is complete, Lai Qi and Lt Li will then complete their duel to the death.

    Then the rest of the movie is mostly Li and Qi riding through the desert fighting off the bandit horde who tries to kill them and the monks in order to steal the magic item.
  • November 22, 2013
    Bisected8
    ^ I've tried condensing that into an example.
  • November 25, 2013
    Bisected8
    Well, the crowner doesn't seem to have accumulated any more votes, so Cooperation Gambit it is.

    Does anyone have anything else to add? Indexes? Hats? Warnings of ill omens?
  • November 25, 2013
    kjnoren
    Have a hat. Though now that I think of it, putting a notice about the crowner in the YKTTW workstation thread might be useful.
  • November 25, 2013
    Bisected8
    I've posted in the workstation thread, but there haven't been any additional votes.

    I'll leave it up for another day or two, just to be sure, and get a mod to call the crowner.
  • November 26, 2013
    Bisected8
    Well, that's been about 24 hours with no further activity.

    I'll launch this tomorrow afternoon, unless anyone has anything else to point out or that needs addressing?
  • November 27, 2013
    DAN004
    I'd wait for moar examples.
  • November 27, 2013
    kjnoren
    There are more than enough examples. The minimum is 3, and here we have 11.

    The amount of examples is less interesting than their quality, anyway.
  • November 27, 2013
    zachdumdum
    I'm not sure if they count as enemies, but it happened in Ocean's Thirteen. The group gets financial sponcorship from Andy Garcia's character to empty Al Pacino's vault, and he even gets a little part in one scheme; all with the condition of giving him the money afterwards. Given that all they wanted was revenge, they comply.
  • November 27, 2013
    Bisected8
    I've added that example.

    Launching in 1 hour.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=3rqd24o0p550itcvkgriucub